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Newb Questions: What does SMP stand for? How do I know if thesystem is utilizing both CPUs? - Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Mark A wrote: | "Caught Napping" <youremail.address> wrote in message | news:pan.2003.07.26.19.08.04.177809email.address. .. | |>What does SMP stand for? Does this designate the Muti-Processor Kernel. |> |>How do you determine if the system is utilizing both CPUs? |> |>I'm running a dual PII 450 with Red Hat 9 (and 1/2 gig RAM) and it seems |>like whenever I fire up an application or two the CPU utilization will get |>pegged at 50% and the system slows down to a crawl. |> | | Symmetrical Multi-Processing. Just a term for a system that has, and ...

  1. #1

    Default Re: Newb Questions: What does SMP stand for? How do I know if thesystem is utilizing both CPUs?

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    Mark A wrote:
    | "Caught Napping" <youremail.address> wrote in message
    | news:pan.2003.07.26.19.08.04.177809email.address. ..
    |
    |>What does SMP stand for? Does this designate the Muti-Processor Kernel.
    |>
    |>How do you determine if the system is utilizing both CPUs?
    |>
    |>I'm running a dual PII 450 with Red Hat 9 (and 1/2 gig RAM) and it seems
    |>like whenever I fire up an application or two the CPU utilization will get
    |>pegged at 50% and the system slows down to a crawl.
    |>
    |
    | Symmetrical Multi-Processing. Just a term for a system that has, and can

    symmetric multi processing. Means the processors are symmetric, or the
    same.

    | effectively use multiple possessors, normally with shared memory and
    shared
    | disk. Unix/Linux does this very well, but Windows has improved recently in
    | this regard.
    |

    windows (NT) does just fine.

    | Clustering is where the processors have their own disk and own memory
    | (effectively separate computers with communication between them). Of
    course
    | one can have clustered SMP systems.
    |

    yes, now we are talking distributed computing in general.

    | When running an SMP system, you need much more memory than would
    normally be
    | the case because each processor is sharing the total memory. Check
    your swap
    | activity to see if your system is memory bound.
    |
    |

    ~twice as much RAM is a good figure, though slightly overkill if you
    have proper SMP chips. The main thing though is processors made for SMP
    have bigger caches due to the shared memory factor. You want them
    trying to hit RAM much less since its harder to get at it because RAM is
    shared.


    - --
    Respectfully,


    CL Gilbert

    "Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that entereth not by the door() into
    the sheepfold{}, but climbeth up some other *way, the same is a thief
    and a robber." John 10:1

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    CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Newb Questions: What does SMP stand for? How do I know if the system is utilizing both CPUs?

    "CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert" <CheckMyGPGKeyThisOneIsFake.com> wrote in message
    >
    > windows (NT) does just fine.
    >
    You have no idea what you are talking about. Although Windows NT does SMP,
    MS has spent tens of millions improving SMP Windows 2000 and Windows 2003
    Advanced Server. There is a reason they have spent that money.


    Mark A Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Newb Questions: What does SMP stand for? How do I know if thesystem is utilizing both CPUs?

    CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert wrote:
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > Mark A wrote:
    > | "CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert" <CheckMyGPGKeyThisOneIsFake.com> wrote in message
    > |
    > |>windows (NT) does just fine.
    > |>
    > |
    > | You have no idea what you are talking about. Although Windows NT does
    > SMP,
    > | MS has spent tens of millions improving SMP Windows 2000 and Windows 2003
    > | Advanced Server. There is a reason they have spent that money.
    > |
    > |
    >
    > you dont know what you are talking about.
    >
    > windows 2000 = windows NT
    > windows 2003 advanced server = windows NT
    >
    > I was not aware that Linux suspended their SMP improvements due to the
    > fact that they can't get any better.
    Heh. He's right. And NT is based on a VMS kernel for the never-released
    "PRISM" OS by DEC, copied from DEC by David and his merry band of
    software pirates when Microsoft hired them.

    Nico Kadel-Garcia Guest

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