Professional Web Applications Themes

Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens - Photography

Hi All, Learning Photography so some basic questions! First Question is on Focus Point. I shoot a snap in two ways. 1. Default is Closest Subject and lets say left focus point is selected. But I do not want left focus point as the main subject. So I get the center focus point to the closest subject (where earlier left focus point was), click the shutter half way and keeping it that way i take it subject i want to click and shoot. 2. I use AF-S mode with "Single Area" or "Dynamic Area" select the subject I want and ...

  1. #1

    Default Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    Hi All,
    Learning Photography so some basic questions!

    First Question is on Focus Point. I shoot a snap in two ways.

    1. Default is Closest Subject and lets say left focus point is
    selected. But I do not want left focus point as the main subject. So I
    get the center focus point to the closest subject (where earlier left
    focus point was), click the shutter half way and keeping it that way i
    take it subject i want to click and shoot.

    2. I use AF-S mode with "Single Area" or "Dynamic Area" select the
    subject I want and shoot.

    In above two ways what will be the difference in output. I could not
    see any and found the second way to click a little time consuming
    relatively.

    Second Question is on Lenses.
    I read lens with focal length 35mm or less is Wide Angle and anything
    above 50mm is telephoto.

    With D70 kit comes the following lend "AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor 18-70mm
    f/3.5-4.5G IF-ED lens"
    Does that mean when zoom is at 18mm it is acting as wide angle and when
    70mm it is not a telephoto. (I have seen once through wide angle lens
    and at 18mm the output was positively not same as through the wide
    angle i had seen)

    ++Tx
    Anirudh

    PS: In C++ lingo "++Tx", translates to Thanks in Advance :-)

    Anirudh Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens


    "Anirudh" <com> wrote in message
    news:googlegroups.com... 

    Then use the first method. A lot of photography is experimenting, and using
    what works best for you and a given situation. I've changed the settings on
    my camera numerous times based on things I've read, only to find something
    someone else does doesn't work for me. You don't have to pay for film or
    processing, so experiment away.
     

    This is subjective and based on an actual 35mm camera using film. Since a
    50mm lens is considered "normal," than anything below that would be
    considered a wide angle, and anything above a telephoto.
     

    Since the image sensor on your D70 is smaller than the film area on a
    regular 35mm camera, you are only getting a portion of what the lens sees,
    therefore you have to apply a multiplication factor of about 1.5 to any lens
    you put on the camera. On a 35mm camera that 18mm lens would be a fisheye,
    but on your D70 it's the equavalent of a 27mm lens, which by all standards
    is a wide-angle lens. At 70mm, using that same formula, you will have the
    equivalent of a 105, which is definitely a mild telephoto.

    As you've noted, on a 35mm camera 50mm is considered a "normal" lens by
    most. But, on your D70 it becomes the equivalent of a 75mm lens, again, a
    very mild telephoto.

    Keep in mind that all this is very subjective and based on your needs.
    After all, what is normal? If you shot mostly sports, a 300mm lens, while
    definitely a telephoto, might be "normal" for you.

    A "zoom" lens is merely one lens that can function as many. You give up
    just a bit of quality when you use most zoom lenses, but the ability to have
    all those lenses in one is very handy indeed. Also, the lens that comes in
    the D70 Kit gets very good reviews all around, and should produce excellent
    images for most applications. You may want to pick up a second zoom to pick
    up where the kit lens leaves off, and also a macro/micro lens for stunning
    close-ups. The beauty of having a camera that you can change lenses on is
    changing lenses. :-)

    Maybe somebody else can explain it better, but hope this helps.


    Sheldon Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    I think I did not put the first question correctly.
    What I meant in the first question what is the difference between the
    outputs of these two shots. Being a novice I cannot see any difference
    but what kind of difference would a professional see in these two
    snaps.

    About the second question. Well great I got quite a few things clear.
    Let me try to put them down again as summary so i may ask another
    question.

    1. Most definitions of "Wide Angle" & "Telephoto" are with respect to
    35mm films that are used in (can i use the word "og") cameras.
    2. Sensor of D70 is smaller and there is multiplication factor or 1.5
    at the given zoom setting. So actual zoom is 18*1.5 ~ 70*1.5 or 27mm ~
    105mm
    3. With above calculations and seeing definition "<35mm as Wide Angle"
    and ">50mm as Telephoto". The default D70 lens kit acts as a mild wide
    angle as well as mild telephoto

    I hope this is what you wanted to explain!!!
    One question that arises is ealier you defined camera by film size
    (which happens to be same as sensor size) "saying it a 35mm camera and
    so on". Now for D70 or 300D what would be definition be or it is
    solely dependent on the lens attached and u define it in terms of range
    and not a pivotal point (like 35mm)?

    Tx
    Anirudh

    Anirudh Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    In article <googlegroups.com>,
    Anirudh <com> wrote: 

    Probably nothing, if you truly focused on the same object both
    times. They are simply two different ways to accomplish the same thing.
    Normally, I would go by the point to subject which I want in sharp focus
    and let it autofocus at half depression of the shutter relase, and then
    shift for desired framing. However, If I had the camera on a tripod,
    or were in a situation where the actual framing was likely to remain
    fairly constant for a series of shots, and the subject of prime interest
    was away from the center of the frame all of the time, I would probably
    shift the focus area to cover that, so I would not have to constantly
    re-frame. (An example might be two people in a debate, or a tennis
    game. Or even two cats in a face-off.)

    The D70 simply offers you multiple ways to accomplish most
    tasks, so you can select the one which best fits the situation and your
    working habits.
     

    Yes. It will probably be some time before the language adjusts
    to the change in the hardware. :-)
     

    The field of coverage of that lens on the D70 is equivalent to
    lenses covering the range 27mm to 105mm on a full frame camera. Some
    other features, such as apparent depth of field, are functions of many
    things, including the *actual* focal length, and the magnification to get
    the final print.
     

    Yes.
     

    The term "35mm camera" refers to a dimension which does not even
    *exist* on the D70. It is the width of the film such a camera uses,
    including the sprocket holes. The actual area of film exposed in a
    *full frame* 35mm camera is 24x36mm. In a half-frame 35mm camera (same
    size film, but a smaller image), the image area is 24x18mm (image is now
    taller than it is wide with the camrea body horizontal). The "wide
    angle" and "telephoto" definitions are for a full-frame 35mm camera, not
    for a half-frame one.
     

    You mean the wide angle or telephoto definition? It is a
    function of the size of the image (the sensor in the digital cameras, or
    the exposed area of the film in a film camera), and the actual focal
    length of the lens. A lens which would be a "normal" on the D70 would
    be a mild telephoto on a half-frame 35mm camera, and a mild wide angle
    on a full-frame 35mm camera.

    And the actual definition is a function of the visual effect of
    an 8x10" print viewed at a standard distance. A "normal" lens will give
    a perspective like viewing a scene through an 8x10" window at the same
    distance.

    You select wide angle or telephoto lenses either to allow you to
    get what you want to photograph into the frame at a distance which you
    can realistically achieve (e.g. a wide angle may be needed to cover a
    given scene indoors, when you cannot back through a wall to get more
    coverage), or a telephoto may be needed because there is a gap between
    you and what you are photographing (e.g. from one rooftop to another)
    and you cannot get closer to what you want to photography.

    *Or* -- you may select them because of the different perspective
    they give to the image. Longer telephotos tend to collapse apparent
    distance, while wider wide angles tend to exaggerate it -- such as a
    photograph of a face in which the nose may predominate.

    Take your lens and camera and start taking photos, and note the
    effects. Pick some scene outdoors, and back away to the maximum
    distance at which you can fill the frame using the lens zoomed to the
    maximum. Take that photo. It does not matter whether it is anything
    particularly interesting in its own right, as it will cost you
    effectively nothing, unlike with film. Now, zoom to as wide a setting
    as you can, and walk forward until you get the same scene filling the
    frame. Take that photograph as well.

    Now -- go home, and either put them on the screen, side by side,
    or print them both to the same size. Spend some time studying the, and
    note how they differ. Pay attention to the objects in the background.
    Pay attention to things near the center of the frame. *See* what the
    choice of focal length does to the image. Even longer or wider lenses
    do this even more, but you have enough to get an idea what it does.

    Enjoy,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    I wrote a long reply hours back and it has vanished but will try again
    .....

    I think my first question did not reach correctly. What I meant was
    what is the technical difference between the two snaps. For me the
    result is same but to a professional would he see some difference
    beween the snaps?

    Tx sheldon for the long second answer . Let me put it into points to
    check if i have got what u r saying right and ask another question on
    tht
    1. "Wide Angle < 35mm" and "Telephoto > 50mm" terms come from film
    based photography where the sensor size and film size is usually 35mm.
    2. In D70 since sensor is smaller a multiplication factor of 1.5 is
    used. So the default lens transfroms from 27mm (18*1.5) which is wide
    angle to 105 mm (70*1.5) which is mild telephoto with respect to a 35mm
    film based camera.

    Have I got all the points u wanted to convey?

    The question is "The term 35mm lens is historically for film based
    cameras." Do dSLRs have similar terms or they vary with the lens used
    and the current focal length set?

    Tx
    Anirudh

    Anirudh Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    > The question is "The term 35mm lens is historically for film based 

    I think what's going on here is that many photographers need something to
    compare the new digital equipment to, especially DSLR cameras. So, the
    comparisons get made to a 35mm camera. I know, without even seeing it, what
    I will see if I put a 50mm lens on a 35mm film camera. So, when I read that
    a 50mm lens will appear to be a 75mm lens on a D70, I have a pretty good
    idea of what I will get without even trying it, due to prior experience.

    I'm sure this will all change over time as digital replaces film. It's a
    lot like where many of today's kids only know that music comes on CD's.
    Vinyl or tape is very old history to them.

    Still, I predict that film will still have a place, especially in the art
    world, and that the goal of many digital camera manufacturers is to make an
    image sensor the same size as a 35mm frame. This would eliminate much of
    the confusion over focal length, and bring things back to a "standard."

    Now, this may or may not happen, but I think it will. The next step will be
    "medium format" digital, and so on and so on. Remember, if you are still
    using film, you have to make these focal length conversion if you use large
    or medium format cameras. A 50mm lens will not be the same on a 35mm, as
    compared to a 2 1/4, as compared to a 4x5, as compared to an 8x10 format
    camera. As the image surface gets larger the lens gets "wider," by
    comparison. So, it just makes sense that if the image gets smaller, like
    the example of the half-frame camera, the lens would appear to be longer.

    Again, just go out and have fun. Take a lot of photos and compare them to
    see what you get. Take portraits with the camera set at wide angle and with
    the camera set at telephoto. See what you get. There are some specific
    rules in photography, but if you want to get artsy, rules are meant to be
    broken.


    Sheldon Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    Anirudh wrote: 



    If you hold the shutter down and re-frame, I believe the default setting
    also locks the exposure so I changed my setup to where only the AE/AF
    lock button locks exposure and I use single area focus.
    paul Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    In article <googlegroups.com>,
    Anirudh <com> wrote: 

    Actually -- it is still there. If you read it once, it would be
    marked as already read, and not normally presented to you a second time,
    depending on just how your newsreader program is set up.

    And I typed a long reply to that one, so check back.

    Enjoy,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    "paul" <net> wrote in message
    news:net... 
    >
    >
    >
    > If you hold the shutter down and re-frame, I believe the default setting
    > also locks the exposure so I changed my setup to where only the AE/AF
    > lock button locks exposure and I use single area focus.[/ref]

    That's what some experts recommend. It's the exposure you want to lock
    down, not necessarily the focus, too.


    Sheldon Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    I guess you mean to say if focus is shifted with shutter half way and
    these two subjects require different exposures then exposure would not
    be correct (with default settings).
    In such a case the second method i.e. "I use AF-S mode with "Single
    Area" or "Dynamic Area" select the subject I want and shoot. " would be
    better bet.

    Anirudh Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    paul wrote: 
    >
    > If you hold the shutter down and re-frame, I believe the default setting
    > also locks the exposure so I changed my setup to where only the AE/AF
    > lock button locks exposure and I use single area focus.[/ref]

    No the default setting only locks the focus. You have to change custom
    setting 16 to get it to lock the exposure as well. Use the AE-L, AF_l
    button to lock exposure if you want that.

    --
    Ronnie Sellar
    Ronnie Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    Ronnie Sellar wrote: 
    >>
    >>If you hold the shutter down and re-frame, I believe the default setting
    >>also locks the exposure so I changed my setup to where only the AE/AF
    >>lock button locks exposure and I use single area focus.[/ref]
    >
    >
    > No the default setting only locks the focus. You have to change custom
    > setting 16 to get it to lock the exposure as well. Use the AE-L, AF_l
    > button to lock exposure if you want that.[/ref]


    I think it was the AE/AF lock button that I changed the behavior on.
    Anyways, figure out these two & the problem is solved.
    paul Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    Sheldon <net> wrote:
     [/ref]
     

    When would you want to set the exposure for a part of the image
    that you didn't want (also) in focus? It's hard for me to imagine
    images where you want exposure set on one thing, and focus set on
    another.

    --
    Ken Tough
    Ken Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    Ken Tough wrote:
     
    >
    >
    > When would you want to set the exposure for a part of the image
    > that you didn't want (also) in focus? It's hard for me to imagine
    > images where you want exposure set on one thing, and focus set on
    > another.[/ref]

    It is not neccesarilly based on the subject in focus. For example, the subject
    is not neccesarilly mid tone or you want to emphasize the light in a different
    way than the light on the subject in focus. Shoot a wedding based on the meter
    without compensation and you will get wildly varrying results. White is about
    two stops too bright; black about 2-3 stops too dim (for the meter). Result is
    underexposure and overexposure respectively.

    On Minolta Maxxum's, there are seperate actions to lock exposure and focus
    seperately.

    [OT] Slide film esp. demands attention to exposure that is not
    subject-in-focus-based (most of the time).

    Cheers,
    Alan

    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
    Alan Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    Alan Browne wrote:
     

    As there is on most cameras; it's called Manual Exposure mode.
    Doug Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    Doug Payne wrote:
     
    >
    >
    > As there is on most cameras; it's called Manual Exposure mode.[/ref]

    That's how I normally shoot.

    But I what I meant is that there is the ubiquitous AF lock with the shutter
    depressed half way, and there is a seperate button (AEL) to hold an exposure
    setting while in "S" or "A" modes.

    So, for example (slide film), set aperture priority, set aperture, set the Exp
    Comp to +2, point the spot meter at a highlight, hold the AEL, compose, focus
    and shoot.

    I believe some other manufacturer(s) lock both focus and exposure settings on
    the half-depressed shutter. This seems very wrong to me.

    Cheers,
    Alan


    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
    Alan Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 18:15:09 -0500, Alan Browne
    <ca> wrote: 

    Olympus's C-8080WZ works this way.

    --
    Ben Rosengart (212) 741-4400 x215
    Sometimes it only makes sense to focus our attention on those
    questions that are equal parts trivial and intriguing.
    --Josh Micah Marshall
    Ben Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens


    Alan Browne wrote: 
    settings on 

    Alan,
    The Minolta AF cameras with 14-segment metering do lock both AF and
    exposure with 1/2 pressed shutter when in 14-seg metering mode. In CW
    or spot they do not lock exposure unless the AE lock is pressed. I
    don't know if the exposure locking in 14-seg can be disabled by a
    custom function in the 9.

    Tom

    tomM Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens

    tomM wrote:
     
    >
    > settings on

    >
    >
    > Alan,
    > The Minolta AF cameras with 14-segment metering do lock both AF and
    > exposure with 1/2 pressed shutter when in 14-seg metering mode. In CW[/ref]

    They do not in the 7xi, 9 and 5. To lock exposure requires one depress the AEL
    button and hold it (or via a custom function 'toggle' it on and off), regardless
    of metering mode. If you're in that metering mode (or others), hold the shutter
    half down in A or S (or P for that matter) and swing around, the exp. setting
    will change as you swing through changing light in the scene.

    I'm pretty sure that other Maxxums/Dyanx' are the same, as Minolta have been
    consistent over time with such things.

    Cheers,
    Alan

    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
    Alan Guest

  20. #20

    Default Re: Nikon D70 + Focus Points + Lens


    Alan Browne wrote: 
    > >
    > > settings on
    > > 
    > >
    > >
    > > Alan,
    > > The Minolta AF cameras with 14-segment metering do lock both AF and
    > > exposure with 1/2 pressed shutter when in 14-seg metering mode. In[/ref][/ref]
    CW 
    depress the AEL 
    regardless 
    the shutter 
    setting 
    have been 


    Alan,
    I checked on a few cameras (my Maxxum XTsi, 700si, and 7, and in the
    manual of the 5 and 9)

    I couldn't find any thing in the manual of the 9, and since I don't
    have the camera, I couldn't check.

    But with the XTsi (which has only 14-seg and spot metering, except in
    manual focus when 14-seg changes to CW according to Minolta USA rep),
    the following happens: AF, 1/2 press shutter, allow the AF to lock on
    a subject, and then recompose -- Exposure does not change.

    The scene I used was a room with a single light. Exposure if I locked
    focus in dark area was 1/2s f/4. The exposure if I locked focus on
    the light was 1/350 f11. If I locked on one and recomposed, the
    exposure didn't change.

    If the camera was in manual focus mode, the exposure changes as I
    recompose. If I half press the shutter, but keep the camera moving so
    AF stays in continuous AF mode, the exposure changes as I recompose.

    With the 700si: The same thing happens (exposure locks when AF locks
    with 1/2 press shutter in 14-seg mode). With the 700si, I can also set
    metering modes to either spot or CW. In those modes and in all modes
    with MF, the exposure changes as I recompose.

    The 7 does the same in AF-S or AF-A when the camera locks focus using
    the shutter button. The 7's manual clearly states this on page 29:
    "Focus lock "(using the shutter button) "also locks the exposure
    settings when 14 segment honeycomb-pattern metering is selected". If I
    set continuous AF on the 7, the exposure will change as I move the
    camera around.

    The 5's manual implies that this happens because they discribe the AF
    and recompose method (which would require exposure be determined by the
    locked subject) and states on page 34: "Focus lock also sets the
    exposure settings." although this is not as clearly stated as it is in
    the 7 manual. I don't have a 5 so I can't confirm.

    However, if a person uses manual focus then the exposure will change if
    the scene is recomposed (except in the 7).

    Do you see a difference in your 9 if you use AF, allow focus to lock,
    and then recompose?

    Tom

    tomM Guest

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. NIKON Manual Focus Zoom lens
    By Charlie in forum Photography
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: August 7th, 07:57 PM
  2. NIKON Standard Manual focus lens for FE2
    By Gordon in forum Photography
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: August 4th, 05:11 PM
  3. Lens shopping - what fit's a Nikon F3 manual focus?
    By I'llGetItRightSoonerOrLater in forum Photography
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: July 18th, 11:53 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139