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OS X Server backup one HD to another question - Mac Applications & Software

Hey group, we just installed an Xserve to run our in office services as well as internet serving. We've got the standard internal 60gig drive and have bought an external 80gig drive to use for backups which will be carried off site and updated weekly. My question is how do I go about making a copy of the internal drive on the external? We're running the Xserve headless so I need either a pointer to a tutorial on the command line doing this, some tips on how to use the command line to do this, or a graphical utility to ...

  1. #1

    Default OS X Server backup one HD to another question

    Hey group, we just installed an Xserve to run our in office services as
    well as internet serving. We've got the standard internal 60gig drive
    and have bought an external 80gig drive to use for backups which will be
    carried off site and updated weekly. My question is how do I go about
    making a copy of the internal drive on the external? We're running the
    Xserve headless so I need either a pointer to a tutorial on the command
    line doing this, some tips on how to use the command line to do this, or
    a graphical utility to do this. I have already tried the PsyncX utility,
    but it doesn't seem to work, and it doesn't look like it's being
    updated. I could just mouth both drives remotely and drag one to the
    other, but since it'll all be going over the network to me and then back
    again it'll be glacially slow, and it won't make a bootable copy.
    Any help out there?

    Thanks,
    David

    D. Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: OS X Server backup one HD to another question

    In article <bellsouth.net>,
    "D. S. Goldsmith" <com> wrote:
     

    You don't really want to drag one disk to the other, if you're hoping that
    your external disk will be a bootable immediate-swappable backup/clone to
    the primary internal drive.

    What you want to use is Mike Bombich's excellent utility, "Carbon Copy
    Cloner," to make a clone of your internal to the external. Of course, this
    is a graphical utility, so it would be somewhat difficult to do this
    without a monitor. On the other hand, all you'd have to do is use Carbon
    Copy Cloner to make an Apple Software Restore image of the internal drive,
    keep it on the external. Then you could use the command line asr command to
    restore the drive in case of problems, i.e.:

    % asr -source /Volumes/external_drive -target /Volumes/internal_drive -erase

    You could also use asr to CREATE the image instead of Carbon Copy Cloner,
    but I've always used CCC because it does such a good job, so I don't know
    what the tricks are to this or why CCC is better, if it's better. Do a

    % man asr

    and visit

    www.bombich.com

    for more information.

    Now, what I'm pointing out to you is technically not a backup, per se; it's
    actually a procedure to implement a disaster recovery system. In other
    words, "backup" usually means that you have incremental backups over time
    so that you can pull out user Y's file that he or she accidentally deleted
    Z months ago. This is somewhat different than keeping a clone of your
    system current at all times. Having a clone of your disk on hand at all
    times might help out with the deleted file sometimes, but not if user Y has
    PURPOSEFULLY deleted Z some months ago. In other words, you'd have a CLONE
    of your disk, but not a time-longitudinal backup.

    On the other hand, trying to restore your computer from something like a
    true backup can be very difficult, because of permissions problems etc. I
    used to try to do this with Retrospect under OS 9 and it was a nightmare; I
    suspect it would be even worse under OS X (though I have no direct
    experience in this regard). In this case, a clone is much more desireable.
    So one is not necessarily better than the other; it depends what you're
    trying to do.

    Carbon Copy Cloner WILL allow you to do some sort of rudimentary
    incremental backup in that you don't HAVE to write over older files, but
    that's not the primary intended functionality of the utility.

    With a clone, if your main drive fails, you can just plug in the external
    and boot straight from that, and be back up and running in less than a
    couple minutes.
    sam Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: OS X Server backup one HD to another question

    I know it's not a 'true' backup, that's okay. We're a little office so
    our policy is that everyone should be working off of the file server, if
    your files on the server then they'll be okay since the server gets
    'backedup' against hard drive failure. Once a week if I can copy the
    server's drive to this external and keep it at home then we'll have
    pretty good insurance against total data loss from fire, theft,
    catastropic drive failure, etc. Since our system drive isn't all that
    big (60 gig isn't all that big anymore) and our files take up even less
    than that I figured the easy thing to do would be to just mirror the
    drive over to the external. The server does run headless so I was really
    looking for a command line utility, or a graphical front end to one.
    I'll look into your suggestions and see what works for me. I'll let the
    group know what works out.

    Thanks,
    David


    In article <5Jf0b.149132$ops.asp.att.net>,
    sam grey <com> wrote:
     
    >
    > You don't really want to drag one disk to the other, if you're hoping that
    > your external disk will be a bootable immediate-swappable backup/clone to
    > the primary internal drive.
    >
    > What you want to use is Mike Bombich's excellent utility, "Carbon Copy
    > Cloner," to make a clone of your internal to the external. Of course, this
    > is a graphical utility, so it would be somewhat difficult to do this
    > without a monitor. On the other hand, all you'd have to do is use Carbon
    > Copy Cloner to make an Apple Software Restore image of the internal drive,
    > keep it on the external. Then you could use the command line asr command to
    > restore the drive in case of problems, i.e.:
    >
    > % asr -source /Volumes/external_drive -target /Volumes/internal_drive -erase
    >
    > You could also use asr to CREATE the image instead of Carbon Copy Cloner,
    > but I've always used CCC because it does such a good job, so I don't know
    > what the tricks are to this or why CCC is better, if it's better. Do a
    >
    > % man asr
    >
    > and visit
    >
    > www.bombich.com
    >
    > for more information.
    >
    > Now, what I'm pointing out to you is technically not a backup, per se; it's
    > actually a procedure to implement a disaster recovery system. In other
    > words, "backup" usually means that you have incremental backups over time
    > so that you can pull out user Y's file that he or she accidentally deleted
    > Z months ago. This is somewhat different than keeping a clone of your
    > system current at all times. Having a clone of your disk on hand at all
    > times might help out with the deleted file sometimes, but not if user Y has
    > PURPOSEFULLY deleted Z some months ago. In other words, you'd have a CLONE
    > of your disk, but not a time-longitudinal backup.
    >
    > On the other hand, trying to restore your computer from something like a
    > true backup can be very difficult, because of permissions problems etc. I
    > used to try to do this with Retrospect under OS 9 and it was a nightmare; I
    > suspect it would be even worse under OS X (though I have no direct
    > experience in this regard). In this case, a clone is much more desireable.
    > So one is not necessarily better than the other; it depends what you're
    > trying to do.
    >
    > Carbon Copy Cloner WILL allow you to do some sort of rudimentary
    > incremental backup in that you don't HAVE to write over older files, but
    > that's not the primary intended functionality of the utility.
    >
    > With a clone, if your main drive fails, you can just plug in the external
    > and boot straight from that, and be back up and running in less than a
    > couple minutes.[/ref]

    D. Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: OS X Server backup one HD to another question

    In article <bellsouth.net>,
    "D. S. Goldsmith" <com> wrote:
     

    Well, you want to check out the command line version of asr, then.

    ASR also has the advantage that if you create an asr backup image (or
    whatever it's called), you can copy it over to the disk in uh, what's it
    called, "bit copy mode" (?), so things will be a lot faster.

    Carbon Copy Cloner basically is a front end to a bunch of command-line
    ditto commands and such, but it is also smart enough to do other
    housekeeping chores in the copying process, from what I understand. Anyway,
    you can do what you want to do using ASR via the command line.

    Lots of information on Mike Bombich's page: www.bombich.com
    sam Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: OS X Server backup one HD to another question

    Just thought I'd let the group know what I did to solve my issue. I
    enlisted the help of a linux savy coworker and just did some trial and
    error. I ended up using disktools to recognize the drives and mount them
    and then in root mode I got asr to do the actual work of copying one
    drive to the other and that worked like a charm. I very relieved to have
    the backups working, well, it's not a true backup, it's just a copy of
    our server's drive. Thanks everyone.

    David

    D. Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: OS X Server backup one HD to another question

    In article <bellsouth.net>,
    "D. S. Goldsmith" <com> wrote:
     

    Carbon Copy Cloner.
     

    Oh. Well then you'll want a command-line utility, won't you.
    ditto would probably do it. 'man ditto' for details.


    Simon Guest

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