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Photographing sunsets - Photography

I'm new to using slide film, and would like to know what some of the best techniques would be to shoot a sunset. I have access to a F100 for the time being. Regards Alex...

  1. #1

    Default Photographing sunsets

    I'm new to using slide film, and would like to know what some of the best
    techniques would be to shoot a sunset. I have access to a F100 for the time
    being.
    Regards
    Alex



    A. Pavan Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Photographing sunsets

    Two quick suggestions.

    First include something in the foreground. Second, try several
    exposures and keep records for a while, until you lean what works for you.
    Sure someone can tell you what they do, but maybe you don't want to do what
    they do. Photography is an art, if you practice it that way.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


    "A. Pavan" <apavaneol.ca> wrote in message
    news:4tjRa.15750$I%7.7957nntp-post.primus.ca...
    > I'm new to using slide film, and would like to know what some of the best
    > techniques would be to shoot a sunset. I have access to a F100 for the
    time
    > being.
    > Regards
    > Alex
    >
    >
    >

    Joseph Meehan Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Photographing sunsets

    "A. Pavan" <apavaneol.ca> writes:
    > I'm new to using slide film, and would like to know what some of the best
    > techniques would be to shoot a sunset. I have access to a F100 for the time
    > being.
    Hi, Alex,
    My suggestion is to bracket your exposures. I use slide film exclusively,
    and I'll take maybe a half dozen exposures of a sunset at one time -- I
    meter off the foreground, the deeper dark sky, the sun if still visible, an
    area near the sun, clouds that are darker, clouds that are lighter. It
    depends on how many different shades of darkness there are. It's probable
    that 2 or 3 of the different exposures will be very interesting, while the
    others are dull and not well-exposed. As the sunset changes, go through it
    again. After you see the results, you'll get some experience in judging how
    to expose for the shots that you like best.

    As to composition, that's more difficult. If possible, frame the scene in
    trees or overhanging branches. If the foreground is interesting, include
    it. If the skies are interesting, show just the skies. If it's boats in the
    water, try silhouetting them, using them to frame the drowning sun, and so
    on.

    See
    [url]http://www.dotphoto.com/GuestViewImage.asp?AID=38612&IID=1169140[/url]
    for a sunset with boats,
    [url]http://www.dotphoto.com/GuestViewImage.asp?AID=38612&IID=1169270[/url]
    for a sunset with mountains in the distance, and
    [url]http://www.dotphoto.com/GuestViewAlbum.asp?AID=567174[/url]
    for some samples of sunsets in the French West Indies.

    Have fun,
    Phil
    --
    Philip Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
    Legal Assistance on the Web | spam and read later. email to philip
    [url]http://www.PhilipStripling.com/[/url] | my domain is read daily.
    Phil Stripling Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Photographing sunsets

    In article <bfcb13$g4r$mv.net>,
    com (drsmith) wrote:
     


    You could try using a graduated neutral density filter to balance out
    the scene. I've havenąt tried one out yet, but I've seen many photos
    that have used them to good effect. Good luck!

    -Ben Abzug
    Ben Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Photographing sunsets

    I agree with others, a GND is necessary. Singh-RAy & B&W are the best
    but very expensive. I use Lee. The Vokin are junk don't waste your
    money. Depending on brightness of sun and cloud cover I will use 1-3
    stop filter. Depending on composition I will use hard stop 9horizon),
    or soft.

    I meter off to one side of the sun and add +1/2 - 1 stop. I then
    bracket 1/2 stop in each direction. Some times I center sun, even
    though it voilates the 'rule of thirds' sometimes I don't. Depends on
    scene. Getting something in foreground adds at lot to the composition.

    As others have stated go take a lot of pictures and decide the formula
    that works for you, after all they are your photo and you want to
    develpoe your own stlye.

    Jim

    *----------------------------------------------------------------*
    * Check-out my web site at: http://SwensonStudio.com *
    * landscape and travel photographs, featuring gorgeous sunsets *
    *----------------------------------------------------------------*



    com (drsmith) wrote in message news:<bfcb13$g4r$mv.net>... 
    >
    > No matter if it's slide or print, you'll probably find it difficult to get
    > both the rich colors of the sunset and the foreground areas at the same
    > time. If you expose for the foreground, the sky turns white. If you
    > expose for the sky, the foreground turns black. There are exceptions to
    > this - like if you have a very light colored or reflective foreground such
    > as the beach near an ocean or a lake.
    >
    > I usually will start with a +2 stop compensation and work from there using
    > color negative film. Slides will be much tougher to work with due to
    > the fact that you can't re-adjust in processing/printing like you could
    > with color negative film.
    >
    > --drsmith[/ref]
    Jim Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Photographing sunsets

    I forgot to answer the second part about color shift. There are
    warming filter and 'sunset' filters. The problem is that they enhance
    the sun and clouds but make other elements of the photo worse. The
    nice blue oceans become a kind of green. The sand on beachs look like
    they been nuked. You get the idea. When I want to warm the shot I use
    E100SW film instead of my favorite E100VS.

    Again I suggets that you try different fils and decide wich works best
    for your style.

    Jim

    *----------------------------------------------------------------*
    * Check-out my web site at: http://SwensonStudio.com *
    * landscape and travel photographs, featuring gorgeous sunsets *
    *----------------------------------------------------------------*

    com (drsmith) wrote in message news:<bfcb13$g4r$mv.net>... 
    >
    > No matter if it's slide or print, you'll probably find it difficult to get
    > both the rich colors of the sunset and the foreground areas at the same
    > time. If you expose for the foreground, the sky turns white. If you
    > expose for the sky, the foreground turns black. There are exceptions to
    > this - like if you have a very light colored or reflective foreground such
    > as the beach near an ocean or a lake.
    >
    > I usually will start with a +2 stop compensation and work from there using
    > color negative film. Slides will be much tougher to work with due to
    > the fact that you can't re-adjust in processing/printing like you could
    > with color negative film.
    >
    > --drsmith[/ref]
    Jim Guest

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