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Pics of the moon - Photography

I'm somewhat of a newbie. I have a Minolta XG-1 camera that's about 20 years old and I LOVE it. Love taking pics with it.... especially since I have 2 kids that are very photogenic. I did a basic photography course and can pretty much shoot anything in the daytime or with a flash... as for nightime. I've yet to take a nice pic of the moon. I always end up with too slow a shudder speed, or no shot at all. When it comes to matching shudder speeds and arpetures, I get confused. I know that there is a ...

  1. #1

    Default Pics of the moon

    I'm somewhat of a newbie. I have a Minolta XG-1 camera that's about 20 years
    old and I LOVE it. Love taking pics with it.... especially since I have 2
    kids that are very photogenic.

    I did a basic photography course and can pretty much shoot anything in the
    daytime or with a flash... as for nightime. I've yet to take a nice pic of
    the moon. I always end up with too slow a shudder speed, or no shot at all.

    When it comes to matching shudder speeds and arpetures, I get confused. I
    know that there is a bit of a system to it. Can someone offer a bit of
    advice? Particularly about a good setting to shoot the moon? I've always
    wanted a REALLY nice shot of a harvest moon.... Or a moon rise...

    Addie



    Admiralla Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Pics of the moon

    Contrary to popular belief, you don't need a slow shutter speed to shoot the
    moon, in fact you dont even need a tripod, the moon is very bright and is
    the main subject of your pic, so use about a 1/250th at F8, bracket 1 stop
    either side just for the sake of it, This means using 1/125th at F8 and
    1/500th at F8, you can go half a stop either side if you want but that could
    be difficult if your camera doesnt do half stops on shutter speed.




    Everything in Photography either halves or doubles.

    If you gain in one part you must lose in another and vice versa.






    These are the standard F-stop numbers used in Photography, every second
    number is approximately double. The larger the number the smaller the actual
    aperture is.

    1.8 2.8 4 5.6 8 11 16 22



    F-stop numbers also determine the "Depth of Field", how sharp an image is
    going to be and how much of what is in the image is sharp.

    For example f 1.8 to f 4 would give a shallow depth of field, making the
    image focused on sharp but everything else in the frame fuzzy. Where as f 11
    to f 22 would give an extensive depth of field, where almost everything in
    the frame was sharp.



    Shutter speeds are also set in the same manner as F-stop numbers in that
    they are all double of half the number next to it. The 2 exceptions being
    1/125 and 1/15, This is just down to the manufacturing process and means
    nothing in particular.



    1/1000 1/500 1/250 1/125 1/60 1/30 1/15 1/8 1sec

    As a rule you will find that any shutter speed slower than 1/60 of a second
    will require the use of a tripod.



    Film speeds are available in a wide range and these also double or halve in
    value as with shutter speeds and f-stop numbers. Film speed is measured in
    ASA or ISO both are identical and will both appear on the film packaging.
    The most common film speeds available are: -



    3 6 12 25 50 100 200 400 800 1600 3200 6400



    Speeds of 3 to 12 are very slow and give a much less grainy finish speeds of
    100 to 200 are medium speeds and speeds of 400 to 6400 are fast usually
    giving a much more grainy effect on the finished print, although modern film
    production tends to give much less grain at all levels. 400asa/iso is a good
    all round film. Normally thgre darker the scene the faster the film speed
    shoudl be, this would allow you to use a faster shutter speed and a smaller,
    ( larger f numbers), apertures



    For example if you start with the settings of f2.8 at 1/60 with 100asa film
    and you really want to use a shutter speed of 1/500, which is an increase of
    3 stops, then you must decrease the aperture by the same amount of stops,
    bringing it to f8, The film speed can also be used in the same way to gain
    the desired result.


    so basically, let the camrea's meter decide what it would use, then change
    to the shutter speed you want to use, and adjust the aperture to suit. if
    you want to use a faster shutter speed you have to use a larger F number,
    but both must be adjusted by the same number of stops, 3 clicks of the
    shutter speed dial = 3 clicks of the aperture dial.


    Hope this helps
    Brian...........................





    "Admiralla" <admirallaNOSPAM.> wrote in message
    news:bfa1as$6bf$1nntp-stjh-01-01.rogers.nf.net...
    > I'm somewhat of a newbie. I have a Minolta XG-1 camera that's about 20
    years
    > old and I LOVE it. Love taking pics with it.... especially since I have 2
    > kids that are very photogenic.
    >
    > I did a basic photography course and can pretty much shoot anything in the
    > daytime or with a flash... as for nightime. I've yet to take a nice pic of
    > the moon. I always end up with too slow a shudder speed, or no shot at
    all.
    >
    > When it comes to matching shudder speeds and arpetures, I get confused. I
    > know that there is a bit of a system to it. Can someone offer a bit of
    > advice? Particularly about a good setting to shoot the moon? I've always
    > wanted a REALLY nice shot of a harvest moon.... Or a moon rise...
    >
    > Addie
    >
    >
    >

    Brian Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Pics of the moon

    Very nice primer for us newbies out here... Thank you!
    Danny


    "Brian" <brian5blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:8O9Sa.48401$4c.42832news-binary.blueyonder.co.uk...
    > Contrary to popular belief, you don't need a slow shutter speed to shoot
    the
    > moon, in fact you dont even need a tripod, the moon is very bright and is
    > the main subject of your pic, so use about a 1/250th at F8, bracket 1
    stop
    > either side just for the sake of it, This means using 1/125th at F8 and
    > 1/500th at F8, you can go half a stop either side if you want but that
    could
    > be difficult if your camera doesnt do half stops on shutter speed.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Everything in Photography either halves or doubles.
    >
    > If you gain in one part you must lose in another and vice versa.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > These are the standard F-stop numbers used in Photography, every second
    > number is approximately double. The larger the number the smaller the
    actual
    > aperture is.
    >
    > 1.8 2.8 4 5.6 8 11 16 22
    >
    >
    >
    > F-stop numbers also determine the "Depth of Field", how sharp an image is
    > going to be and how much of what is in the image is sharp.
    >
    > For example f 1.8 to f 4 would give a shallow depth of field, making the
    > image focused on sharp but everything else in the frame fuzzy. Where as f
    11
    > to f 22 would give an extensive depth of field, where almost everything in
    > the frame was sharp.
    >
    >
    >
    > Shutter speeds are also set in the same manner as F-stop numbers in that
    > they are all double of half the number next to it. The 2 exceptions being
    > 1/125 and 1/15, This is just down to the manufacturing process and means
    > nothing in particular.
    >
    >
    >
    > 1/1000 1/500 1/250 1/125 1/60 1/30 1/15 1/8 1sec
    >
    > As a rule you will find that any shutter speed slower than 1/60 of a
    second
    > will require the use of a tripod.
    >
    >
    >
    > Film speeds are available in a wide range and these also double or halve
    in
    > value as with shutter speeds and f-stop numbers. Film speed is measured in
    > ASA or ISO both are identical and will both appear on the film packaging.
    > The most common film speeds available are: -
    >
    >
    >
    > 3 6 12 25 50 100 200 400 800 1600 3200 6400
    >
    >
    >
    > Speeds of 3 to 12 are very slow and give a much less grainy finish speeds
    of
    > 100 to 200 are medium speeds and speeds of 400 to 6400 are fast usually
    > giving a much more grainy effect on the finished print, although modern
    film
    > production tends to give much less grain at all levels. 400asa/iso is a
    good
    > all round film. Normally thgre darker the scene the faster the film speed
    > shoudl be, this would allow you to use a faster shutter speed and a
    smaller,
    > ( larger f numbers), apertures
    >
    >
    >
    > For example if you start with the settings of f2.8 at 1/60 with 100asa
    film
    > and you really want to use a shutter speed of 1/500, which is an increase
    of
    > 3 stops, then you must decrease the aperture by the same amount of stops,
    > bringing it to f8, The film speed can also be used in the same way to gain
    > the desired result.
    >
    >
    > so basically, let the camrea's meter decide what it would use, then change
    > to the shutter speed you want to use, and adjust the aperture to suit. if
    > you want to use a faster shutter speed you have to use a larger F number,
    > but both must be adjusted by the same number of stops, 3 clicks of the
    > shutter speed dial = 3 clicks of the aperture dial.
    >
    >
    > Hope this helps
    > Brian...........................
    >
    > (snip)

    Danny Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Pics of the moon

    If you are using a telephoto you really should use a tripod. I do not know
    what the length of your lens is but basics are: use a shutter speed of
    1/250, for iso 25 f/5.6, for iso 50 f/8, for iso 100 f/11 and for iso 400
    f/22 and bracket +- in half stops.

    --
    Tom

    [url]http://www.tom-photo.com/[/url]


    "Admiralla" <admirallaNOSPAM.> wrote in message
    news:bfa1as$6bf$1nntp-stjh-01-01.rogers.nf.net...
    > I'm somewhat of a newbie. I have a Minolta XG-1 camera that's about 20
    years
    > old and I LOVE it. Love taking pics with it.... especially since I have 2
    > kids that are very photogenic.
    >
    > I did a basic photography course and can pretty much shoot anything in the
    > daytime or with a flash... as for nightime. I've yet to take a nice pic of
    > the moon. I always end up with too slow a shudder speed, or no shot at
    all.
    >
    > When it comes to matching shudder speeds and arpetures, I get confused. I
    > know that there is a bit of a system to it. Can someone offer a bit of
    > advice? Particularly about a good setting to shoot the moon? I've always
    > wanted a REALLY nice shot of a harvest moon.... Or a moon rise...
    >
    > Addie
    >
    >
    >

    rufref Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Pics of the moon

    My bad, I should have said that "in theory" you don't need a tripod, but to
    avoid camera shake, which will blur your final image. you should use one
    where possible, yes for longer lenses and slower film speeds, the shutter
    speed for tripod use increases,

    As a rule, always use a tripod, if its available.

    Brian......................

    "rufref" <tom.photoverizon.net> wrote in message
    news:60dSa.8610$Qe5.6299nwrddc03.gnilink.net...
    > If you are using a telephoto you really should use a tripod. I do not
    know
    > what the length of your lens is but basics are: use a shutter speed of
    > 1/250, for iso 25 f/5.6, for iso 50 f/8, for iso 100 f/11 and for iso 400
    > f/22 and bracket +- in half stops.
    >
    > --
    > Tom
    >
    > [url]http://www.tom-photo.com/[/url]
    >
    >
    > "Admiralla" <admirallaNOSPAM.> wrote in message
    > news:bfa1as$6bf$1nntp-stjh-01-01.rogers.nf.net...
    > > I'm somewhat of a newbie. I have a Minolta XG-1 camera that's about 20
    > years
    > > old and I LOVE it. Love taking pics with it.... especially since I have
    2
    > > kids that are very photogenic.
    > >
    > > I did a basic photography course and can pretty much shoot anything in
    the
    > > daytime or with a flash... as for nightime. I've yet to take a nice pic
    of
    > > the moon. I always end up with too slow a shudder speed, or no shot at
    > all.
    > >
    > > When it comes to matching shudder speeds and arpetures, I get confused.
    I
    > > know that there is a bit of a system to it. Can someone offer a bit of
    > > advice? Particularly about a good setting to shoot the moon? I've always
    > > wanted a REALLY nice shot of a harvest moon.... Or a moon rise...
    > >
    > > Addie
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >

    Brian Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Pics of the moon

    "Admiralla" <admirallaNOSPAM.> wrote in message news:<bfa1as$6bf$1nntp-stjh-01-01.rogers.nf.net>...
    > advice? Particularly about a good setting to shoot the moon? I've always
    > wanted a REALLY nice shot of a harvest moon.... Or a moon rise...
    >
    > Addie

    This moon shot is exposed at 1/125 seconds, f/11, ISO 100:

    [url]http://www.jesperolsen.net/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?name=PAW&photo=13[/url]

    Jesper
    Jesper Olsen Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Pics of the moon


    "Jesper Olsen" <jolsenmail2world.com> wrote in message
    news:6b17fa95.0307192117.7e117a28posting.google.c om...
    > (snip)
    > This moon shot is exposed at 1/125 seconds, f/11, ISO 100:
    >
    > [url]http://www.jesperolsen.net/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?name=PAW&photo=13[/url]
    >
    > Jesper
    A very nice shot of the moon... (and a very pretty Charlien Enkelit I might
    add)..., However.. Week 22, (Scandinavian, the first pic), is priceless!
    an excellent pic!

    Danny



    Danny Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Pics of the moon

    Wow, I think you just summed up the roots of my photography course in one
    post there....

    Thanks so much! I printed it off so I could have something to refer back to!

    Heather

    "Brian" <brian5blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:8O9Sa.48401$4c.42832news-binary.blueyonder.co.uk...
    > Contrary to popular belief, you don't need a slow shutter speed to shoot
    the
    > moon, in fact you dont even need a tripod, the moon is very bright and is
    > the main subject of your pic, so use about a 1/250th at F8, bracket 1
    stop
    > either side just for the sake of it, This means using 1/125th at F8 and
    > 1/500th at F8, you can go half a stop either side if you want but that
    could
    > be difficult if your camera doesnt do half stops on shutter speed.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Everything in Photography either halves or doubles.
    >
    > If you gain in one part you must lose in another and vice versa.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > These are the standard F-stop numbers used in Photography, every second
    > number is approximately double. The larger the number the smaller the
    actual
    > aperture is.
    >
    > 1.8 2.8 4 5.6 8 11 16 22
    >
    >
    >
    > F-stop numbers also determine the "Depth of Field", how sharp an image is
    > going to be and how much of what is in the image is sharp.
    >
    > For example f 1.8 to f 4 would give a shallow depth of field, making the
    > image focused on sharp but everything else in the frame fuzzy. Where as f
    11
    > to f 22 would give an extensive depth of field, where almost everything in
    > the frame was sharp.
    >
    >
    >
    > Shutter speeds are also set in the same manner as F-stop numbers in that
    > they are all double of half the number next to it. The 2 exceptions being
    > 1/125 and 1/15, This is just down to the manufacturing process and means
    > nothing in particular.
    >
    >
    >
    > 1/1000 1/500 1/250 1/125 1/60 1/30 1/15 1/8 1sec
    >
    > As a rule you will find that any shutter speed slower than 1/60 of a
    second
    > will require the use of a tripod.
    >
    >
    >
    > Film speeds are available in a wide range and these also double or halve
    in
    > value as with shutter speeds and f-stop numbers. Film speed is measured in
    > ASA or ISO both are identical and will both appear on the film packaging.
    > The most common film speeds available are: -
    >
    >
    >
    > 3 6 12 25 50 100 200 400 800 1600 3200 6400
    >
    >
    >
    > Speeds of 3 to 12 are very slow and give a much less grainy finish speeds
    of
    > 100 to 200 are medium speeds and speeds of 400 to 6400 are fast usually
    > giving a much more grainy effect on the finished print, although modern
    film
    > production tends to give much less grain at all levels. 400asa/iso is a
    good
    > all round film. Normally thgre darker the scene the faster the film speed
    > shoudl be, this would allow you to use a faster shutter speed and a
    smaller,
    > ( larger f numbers), apertures
    >
    >
    >
    > For example if you start with the settings of f2.8 at 1/60 with 100asa
    film
    > and you really want to use a shutter speed of 1/500, which is an increase
    of
    > 3 stops, then you must decrease the aperture by the same amount of stops,
    > bringing it to f8, The film speed can also be used in the same way to gain
    > the desired result.
    >
    >
    > so basically, let the camrea's meter decide what it would use, then change
    > to the shutter speed you want to use, and adjust the aperture to suit. if
    > you want to use a faster shutter speed you have to use a larger F number,
    > but both must be adjusted by the same number of stops, 3 clicks of the
    > shutter speed dial = 3 clicks of the aperture dial.
    >
    >
    > Hope this helps
    > Brian...........................
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Admiralla" <admirallaNOSPAM.> wrote in message
    > news:bfa1as$6bf$1nntp-stjh-01-01.rogers.nf.net...
    > > I'm somewhat of a newbie. I have a Minolta XG-1 camera that's about 20
    > years
    > > old and I LOVE it. Love taking pics with it.... especially since I have
    2
    > > kids that are very photogenic.
    > >
    > > I did a basic photography course and can pretty much shoot anything in
    the
    > > daytime or with a flash... as for nightime. I've yet to take a nice pic
    of
    > > the moon. I always end up with too slow a shudder speed, or no shot at
    > all.
    > >
    > > When it comes to matching shudder speeds and arpetures, I get confused.
    I
    > > know that there is a bit of a system to it. Can someone offer a bit of
    > > advice? Particularly about a good setting to shoot the moon? I've always
    > > wanted a REALLY nice shot of a harvest moon.... Or a moon rise...
    > >
    > > Addie
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >

    Admiralla Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Pics of the moon

    no problem glad to be off help, those were the notes the course I took when
    I started.

    Brian....................

    "Admiralla" <admirallaNOSPAM.> wrote in message
    news:bfetvf$l73$1nntp-stjh-01-01.rogers.nf.net...
    > Wow, I think you just summed up the roots of my photography course in one
    > post there....
    >
    > Thanks so much! I printed it off so I could have something to refer back
    to!
    >
    > Heather
    >
    > "Brian" <brian5blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:8O9Sa.48401$4c.42832news-binary.blueyonder.co.uk...
    > > Contrary to popular belief, you don't need a slow shutter speed to shoot
    > the
    > > moon, in fact you dont even need a tripod, the moon is very bright and
    is
    > > the main subject of your pic, so use about a 1/250th at F8, bracket 1
    > stop
    > > either side just for the sake of it, This means using 1/125th at F8 and
    > > 1/500th at F8, you can go half a stop either side if you want but that
    > could
    > > be difficult if your camera doesnt do half stops on shutter speed.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Everything in Photography either halves or doubles.
    > >
    > > If you gain in one part you must lose in another and vice versa.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > These are the standard F-stop numbers used in Photography, every second
    > > number is approximately double. The larger the number the smaller the
    > actual
    > > aperture is.
    > >
    > > 1.8 2.8 4 5.6 8 11 16 22
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > F-stop numbers also determine the "Depth of Field", how sharp an image
    is
    > > going to be and how much of what is in the image is sharp.
    > >
    > > For example f 1.8 to f 4 would give a shallow depth of field, making
    the
    > > image focused on sharp but everything else in the frame fuzzy. Where as
    f
    > 11
    > > to f 22 would give an extensive depth of field, where almost everything
    in
    > > the frame was sharp.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Shutter speeds are also set in the same manner as F-stop numbers in that
    > > they are all double of half the number next to it. The 2 exceptions
    being
    > > 1/125 and 1/15, This is just down to the manufacturing process and means
    > > nothing in particular.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > 1/1000 1/500 1/250 1/125 1/60 1/30 1/15 1/8 1sec
    > >
    > > As a rule you will find that any shutter speed slower than 1/60 of a
    > second
    > > will require the use of a tripod.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Film speeds are available in a wide range and these also double or
    halve
    > in
    > > value as with shutter speeds and f-stop numbers. Film speed is measured
    in
    > > ASA or ISO both are identical and will both appear on the film
    packaging.
    > > The most common film speeds available are: -
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > 3 6 12 25 50 100 200 400 800 1600 3200 6400
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Speeds of 3 to 12 are very slow and give a much less grainy finish
    speeds
    > of
    > > 100 to 200 are medium speeds and speeds of 400 to 6400 are fast usually
    > > giving a much more grainy effect on the finished print, although modern
    > film
    > > production tends to give much less grain at all levels. 400asa/iso is a
    > good
    > > all round film. Normally thgre darker the scene the faster the film
    speed
    > > shoudl be, this would allow you to use a faster shutter speed and a
    > smaller,
    > > ( larger f numbers), apertures
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > For example if you start with the settings of f2.8 at 1/60 with 100asa
    > film
    > > and you really want to use a shutter speed of 1/500, which is an
    increase
    > of
    > > 3 stops, then you must decrease the aperture by the same amount of
    stops,
    > > bringing it to f8, The film speed can also be used in the same way to
    gain
    > > the desired result.
    > >
    > >
    > > so basically, let the camrea's meter decide what it would use, then
    change
    > > to the shutter speed you want to use, and adjust the aperture to suit.
    if
    > > you want to use a faster shutter speed you have to use a larger F
    number,
    > > but both must be adjusted by the same number of stops, 3 clicks of the
    > > shutter speed dial = 3 clicks of the aperture dial.
    > >
    > >
    > > Hope this helps
    > > Brian...........................
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Admiralla" <admirallaNOSPAM.> wrote in message
    > > news:bfa1as$6bf$1nntp-stjh-01-01.rogers.nf.net...
    > > > I'm somewhat of a newbie. I have a Minolta XG-1 camera that's about 20
    > > years
    > > > old and I LOVE it. Love taking pics with it.... especially since I
    have
    > 2
    > > > kids that are very photogenic.
    > > >
    > > > I did a basic photography course and can pretty much shoot anything in
    > the
    > > > daytime or with a flash... as for nightime. I've yet to take a nice
    pic
    > of
    > > > the moon. I always end up with too slow a shudder speed, or no shot at
    > > all.
    > > >
    > > > When it comes to matching shudder speeds and arpetures, I get
    confused.
    > I
    > > > know that there is a bit of a system to it. Can someone offer a bit of
    > > > advice? Particularly about a good setting to shoot the moon? I've
    always
    > > > wanted a REALLY nice shot of a harvest moon.... Or a moon rise...
    > > >
    > > > Addie
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >

    Brian Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Pics of the moon

    [email]brian5blueyonder.co.uk[/email] (Brian) writes:
    > As a rule you will find that any shutter speed slower than 1/60 of a second
    > will require the use of a tripod.
    For 35mm film, the rule is that any shutter speed slower than the lens
    focal length will require a tripod. You can shoot hand held at 1/25th of
    a second with a 24mm lens, but a 250mm lens will require a 1/250th of a
    second shutter to minimize blur.

    In these days of ultra zoom lenses that is a good rule to remember,
    particularly since most zooms change f-stop as they change focal length.

    --
    [url]http://home.teleport.com/~larryc[/url]
    Larry Caldwell Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Pics of the moon


    "Brian" <brian5blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:8O9Sa.48401$4c.42832news-binary.blueyonder.co.uk...
    > Contrary to popular belief, you don't need a slow shutter speed to shoot
    the
    > moon, in fact you dont even need a tripod, the moon is very bright and is
    > the main subject of your pic, so use about a 1/250th at F8, bracket 1
    stop
    > either side just for the sake of it, This means using 1/125th at F8 and
    > 1/500th at F8, you can go half a stop either side if you want but that
    could
    > be difficult if your camera doesnt do half stops on shutter speed.
    Doesn't this depend on film speed?

    BTW, the brightness of the moon is about the same as the brightness of the
    earth in direct sunlight. The "sunny 16" rule is a good place to start.

    Randy



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    Randy Ott Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Pics of the moon


    "Randy Ott" <randyiscdata.com> wrote in message
    news:U1CTa.1110$0A3.214250518newssvr12.news.prodi gy.com...
    >
    > "Brian" <brian5blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:8O9Sa.48401$4c.42832news-binary.blueyonder.co.uk...
    > > Contrary to popular belief, you don't need a slow shutter speed to shoot
    > the
    > > moon, in fact you dont even need a tripod, the moon is very bright and
    is
    > > the main subject of your pic, so use about a 1/250th at F8, bracket 1
    > stop
    > > either side just for the sake of it, This means using 1/125th at F8 and
    > > 1/500th at F8, you can go half a stop either side if you want but that
    > could
    > > be difficult if your camera doesnt do half stops on shutter speed.
    >
    > Doesn't this depend on film speed?
    >
    > BTW, the brightness of the moon is about the same as the brightness of the
    > earth in direct sunlight. The "sunny 16" rule is a good place to start.
    >
    > Randy
    >
    Not really, well ok, I would advise using say 200 ISO and faster, but try it
    , I think you will be pleasantly surprised, don't meter off the entire
    scene, just meter off the moon itself.
    People always seem to be reluctant to try something out, I mean, we spend
    hundreds, even thousands, on camera equipment to take photo's, and yet ask
    them to possibly waste ONE film, at a total cost of maybe 10 including
    processing and printing, to experiment , and they won't do it, but we waste
    film and don't think twice about it, maybe out of a 36 exposure roll, the
    average amature gets 3 or 4 good prints, the rest is, and I'm sure we will
    all agree here, Crap.
    Always thought that was strange. you have the equipment so why not use it.

    Brian.......................

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    Brian Guest

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