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Reasonable partition scheme - Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration

I just bought a 120 GB HDD as a replacement. I now have a 20Gb Quantum Fireball with a fast access time and a 120GB Samsung with slower access time. And now I am in a need of a reasonable partition scheme and I am interested in you ideas. I use the machine for SOHO tasks so no video or audio editing. any suggestions?...

  1. #1

    Default Reasonable partition scheme

    I just bought a 120 GB HDD as a replacement. I now have a 20Gb Quantum Fireball with a fast access time and a 120GB Samsung with slower access time.

    And now I am in a need of a reasonable partition scheme and I am interested in you ideas.

    I use the machine for SOHO tasks so no video or audio editing.

    any suggestions?
    Jaque Moreau Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Reasonable partition scheme

    On Thu, 26 Jun 2003 18:27:19 +0200, Jaque Moreau wrote:
    > I just bought a 120 GB HDD as a replacement. I now have a 20Gb
    > Quantum Fireball with a fast access time and a 120GB Samsung with
    > slower access time.
    >
    > And now I am in a need of a reasonable partition scheme and I am
    > interested in you ideas.
    Partition the drive with one partition for /, one of about 20GB for /home
    and one for swap. After you figure out what -your- partition requirements
    are, then re-install with the next upgraded version of your preferred
    distro.

    With the separate /home partition you do not then lose your personal data.

    Dave Uhring Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Reasonable partition scheme

    Jaque Moreau wrote:
    > I just bought a 120 GB HDD as a replacement. I now have a 20Gb Quantum
    > Fireball with a fast access time and a 120GB Samsung with slower access
    > time.
    >
    > And now I am in a need of a reasonable partition scheme and I am
    > interested in you ideas.
    .... depends how 'hardcore' you want to get with partitioning
    schemes (following the ROTR). you could simply setup up three,
    such as swap, /boot, /. or you could go here:
    [url]http://www.linuxselfhelp.com/cats/installation_configuration.html[/url]
    and look for the installation/partition howto's. or go to B&N,
    hang out with a cup of coffee and read the install chapter in
    the 'inside linux' book :)

    --
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer, # Black holes result
    skydiver, and author: "Inside Linux", # when God divides the
    "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed" # universe by zero

    mjt Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Reasonable partition scheme

    Nico Kadel-Garcia wrote:
    > No modern Linux distro requires a separate /boot anymore, either. Some
    > of them will even let you get away without a swap: it's sometimes easier
    > to add a swapfile, and nearly as fast as a swap partition!
    .... agreed

    i guess my concern would be that a person should develop good
    habits early - what if they want to do the sysadmin thing and
    have all these ill-conceived bad habits carried forward ;0

    here's another reason to isolate individual partitions: what
    if something goes rwong with one of those? at least the issue
    is isolated to a single partition rather than affect everything
    else. also, if you have to grow/shrink some partition, it's
    easier to size just the one smaller one, rather than the whole
    big one.
    > Now that the system backup and re-installation programs no longer rely
    > on partitions (see the behavior of the discarded dump/restore tools,
    > generally replaced today with the excellentn GNU version of tar!), and
    > the OS's and boot loaders and BIOS's can deal with much larger
    > partitions, the old reasons for many small partitions are frankly gone.
    ....i use [url]www.partimage.org[/url] ...
    > Break things up if you want to prevent a specific partition from
    > overloading your system when it gets spewed into (such as a mail spool),
    > or if you want to use more space than fits on one disk (such as putting
    > home directories on a separate RAID array or /usr/src on another disk
    > for development machines).
    .... see! :)

    --
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer, # Black holes result
    skydiver, and author: "Inside Linux", # when God divides the
    "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed" # universe by zero

    mjt Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Reasonable partition scheme

    mjt wrote:
    > Nico Kadel-Garcia wrote:
    >
    >
    >>No modern Linux distro requires a separate /boot anymore, either. Some
    >>of them will even let you get away without a swap: it's sometimes easier
    >>to add a swapfile, and nearly as fast as a swap partition!
    >
    >
    > .... agreed
    >
    > i guess my concern would be that a person should develop good
    > habits early - what if they want to do the sysadmin thing and
    > have all these ill-conceived bad habits carried forward ;0
    >
    > here's another reason to isolate individual partitions: what
    > if something goes rwong with one of those? at least the issue
    > is isolated to a single partition rather than affect everything
    > else. also, if you have to grow/shrink some partition, it's
    > easier to size just the one smaller one, rather than the whole
    > big one.
    Ahh. Yes, these are familiar issues. I find them vastly outweighed by
    the insanities needed to repartition, or to re-arrange the sizes of the
    partitions which are often expended unpredictably. For example, when
    mailman moved from /home/mailman to /var/mailman, it caused some great
    fun and games. Or when /var/log expands wildly because you are in fact
    *running* mailman, or you realize you need to build kernels and /usr/src
    expands by half a gig as you try out different kernels and you put in a
    lean, mean, stripped /usr with no growth room, etc.

    My point is to avoid the grow/shrink thing entirely by using partitions
    only where needed. It's often difficult to retask a machine that
    deliberately left any partition small, and wasteful to split your spare
    disk space among multiple partitons trying to outthink future uses and
    users.
    >>Now that the system backup and re-installation programs no longer rely
    >>on partitions (see the behavior of the discarded dump/restore tools,
    >>generally replaced today with the excellentn GNU version of tar!), and
    >>the OS's and boot loaders and BIOS's can deal with much larger
    >>partitions, the old reasons for many small partitions are frankly gone.
    >
    >
    > ....i use [url]www.partimage.org[/url] ...
    >
    >
    >>Break things up if you want to prevent a specific partition from
    >>overloading your system when it gets spewed into (such as a mail spool),
    >>or if you want to use more space than fits on one disk (such as putting
    >>home directories on a separate RAID array or /usr/src on another disk
    >>for development machines).
    >
    >
    > .... see! :)
    Well, yes, but neither of these include splitting off /boot (which is no
    longer needed for the old 1023 cylinder limit of old BIOS's and LILO),
    don't split off / from /usr (the old BSD style limitations of a fixed
    size for / have gone the way of dodo many, many years ago), don't split
    off /usr/local from /usr (almost all system tools get put in /usr these
    days, as the package management systems have improved and the GNU
    freeware is a fundamental part of the Linux distributions), etc.

    Also, disk and tape have gotten much larger and cheaper. Disk has gotten
    so cheap it's often much faster/easier to backup to hard drives rather
    than to tapes limited to being much smaller than the disk, so you don't
    have to worry about putting / on its own tape, /usr on another, /home on
    a third, engage in tower of hanoi scheduled tape backups, etc.

    Been there, done that, wrote the tools to manage it for multiple OS's.
    I'm *GLAD* to be rid of that cruft.

    Nico Kadel-Garcia Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Reasonable partition scheme

    Finally I ended up doing this:

    Dateisystem 1k-Blöcke Benutzt Verfügbar Ben% montiert auf
    /dev/hda2 3850320 170120 3484612 5% /
    /dev/hdc5 60476036 4379904 53024104 8% /usr
    /dev/hdc6 26209780 153548 24724848 1% /var
    /dev/hda6 5771468 339808 5138476 7% /usr/lib
    /dev/hda7 5779500 34828 5451088 1% /usr/local/lib
    /dev/hdc8 10080488 32828 9535592 1% /tmp
    /dev/md0 3850176 2948036 706556 81% /home

    Jaque Moreau Guest

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