Professional Web Applications Themes

"Rebuild Desktop" in OSX? - Mac Applications & Software

Concerning the internal database in OSX that associates files with the app's that open those files - Does anyone know the name and location of that database? I want to periodically trash the database, to force OSX to rebuild it from scratch, similar to how I used to "rebuild-the-desktop" in OS9. Thanks, Mark-...

  1. #1

    Default "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?


    Concerning the internal database in OSX that associates files with the
    app's that open those files -

    Does anyone know the name and location of that database?

    I want to periodically trash the database, to force OSX to rebuild it
    from scratch, similar to how I used to "rebuild-the-desktop" in OS9.

    Thanks,

    Mark-
    Mark Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <230820031517187328%com>,
    Mark Conrad <com> wrote:
     

    See <http://www.westwind.com/reference/OS-X/where-files.html>
    The relevent files are different in 10.2 and in the earlier versions.

    Alternatively, get "dragster" or "Jaguar Cache Cleaner" at
    versiontracker.

    --
    James Meiss
    <http://amath.colorado.edu/faculty/jdm>
    James Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    Mark Conrad:

    Thanks for your post on this thread:

    in article 230820031517187328%com, Mark Conrad at
    com wrote on 8/23/03 3:16 PM:
     

    Is there a difference between file associations and icon associations? I've
    had a problem in the past where the Finder crashed whenever it needed to
    display the icon associated with a file type.

    Thanks,

    Henry

    com remove 'zzz' 

    Henry Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?



    Thanks for that info'

    Stuff like this is impossible to get from the regular books on OSX, at
    least from the large pile of books that I have.

    As long as I am complaining about the present crop of books, I have
    never found a really good book about Apple's "Terminal".

    ....some 1,000 page book that explains in simple language what all the
    approx' 900 commands do, especially exactly what the many options and
    arguments to those 900 commands do.

    The "man" pages just do not cut it, as far as a tutorial is concerned.

    Near as I can determine, all the Unix-heads out there had to learn all
    that stuff the hard way. (trial-and-error)



    In article <colorado.edu>, James
    Meiss <invalid> wrote:
     
    >
    > See <http://www.westwind.com/reference/OS-X/where-files.html>
    > The relevent files are different in 10.2 and in the earlier versions.
    >
    > Alternatively, get "dragster" or "Jaguar Cache Cleaner" at
    > versiontracker.[/ref]
    Mark Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <BB6D7C7B.10E14%com>, Henry
    <com> wrote:
     

    Quite a bit of confusion exists on this subject.

    The way I understand it is that the term "rebuild the desktop" was
    concerned mainly with two invisible files in OS9 and earlier OSs.

    Those two files were named "Desktop DB" and "Desktop DF".

    "Desktop DB" stored icon information, while "Desktop DF" stored
    information about where on the _desktop_ display all files (windows)
    are located, (their screen position and location)

    Now with OSX everything is different, those two files are not even used.
    (different files are used instead, I am in the process of finding their
    names and locations) - - - In other words, I deleted "Desktop DB" and
    "Desktop DF" in OSX, and my icons were not affected, also the location
    of windows/files on my desktop was remembered accurately, despite those
    two missing files.

    "Desktop DF" does indeed store information about files, but only
    information connected with the files location on the display screen
    (desktop) - once the file is "opened".

    Most all the other information about files is stored in a different
    thing called the "directory", which is mainly concerned with where the
    files are located on the disk.

    Confusing, isn't it.


    Mark-
    Mark Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <230820032329237849%com>,
    Mark Conrad <com> wrote:
     

    *sigh* Didn't we do this one already, over in comp.sys.mac.apps?

    --
    Tom "Tom" Harrington
    Macaroni, Automated System Maintenance for Mac OS X.
    Version 1.4: Best cleanup yet, gets files other tools miss.
    See http://www.atomicbird.com/
    Tom Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <tph-8F3DC7.15263824082003localhost>, Tom Harrington
    <no.spam.dammit.net> wrote:
     
    >
    > *sigh* Didn't we do this one already, over in comp.sys.mac.apps?[/ref]

    Yep, but "we" did not get anywhere, no progress.<g>

    In this thread, the problem was resolved, thanks to James Meiss.



    To rebuild desktop in OS 10.2 and newer -
    (warning, different for OS 10.1)

    Basically, discard these two files from OSX root:

    /Library/Caches/com.apple.LaunchServices.UserCache.csstore
    (equivilent to OS9's "Desktop DB" file)

    /Library/Preferences/com.apple.LaunchServices.plist
    (equivilent to OS9's "Desktop DF" file)

    After discarding, it is advisable to look at the OSX partition with
    Norton's "Disk Editor X" to make certain the files are no longer there.

    Then upon reboot into OSX root, the OSX (operating system) will install
    brand new versions of the above two files.

    There are a few gotchas involved, so anyone contemplating doing this
    should get the rest of the details, unless they know exactly what they
    are doing. Be happy to supply such details.

    WARNING: Severe damage can be done to OSX, if one messes this up.

    It is assumed that one is comfortable using the root account, using
    Norton's "Disk Editor X", and using Apple's "Terminal".

    Mark-
    Mark Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <240820031905430405%com>,
    Mark Conrad <com> wrote:
     

    Given that you apparently managed to do something...

    So what? I know what rebuilding the desktop does in OS 9 and before. In
    the year and a half I've been running OS X, I haven't had any problems
    like those created by desktop files needing rebuilding. So what does
    this get you?

    --
    Writer of Fortune
    Journal: http://bruceb.livejournal.com/
    "Everything possible to be believ'd is an image of truth."
    Bruce Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <newsguy.com>, Bruce
    Baugh <com> wrote:
     
    >
    > Given that you apparently managed to do something...
    >
    > So what?[/ref]

    I thought you would never ask ;-)

    Generally, as you observed, one can get along fine "forever" without
    worrying about rebuilding the desktop, in OSX or even in OS9, for that
    matter.

    Even if trouble points towards corrupted desktop files as being the
    culprit, then I can always backup my entire OSX partition in five
    minutes, without diddling around with "rebuilding the desktop".
    (which would take longer than five minutes, BTW)

    Despite all the above, there are valid reasons for rebuilding the
    desktop files, in special cases.

    Assuming the desktop files in OSX store the same type of general
    information as they did in OS9, as the website at :

    www.westwind.com/reference/OS-X/where-files.html

    ....implies they do, then the OSX desktop files can get bloated over
    time. This is because the desktop file retains information about
    deleted files, and that now-useless data keeps building up as more and
    more files are deleted in the course of normal operation.

    In my particular case, I have a vested interest in making my OSX files
    consume as little space as possible. My OS-10.2.6 files consume
    3.19-GBs of space in a 12-GB partition, when all those files are jammed
    into one corner of the 12 GB partition.

    This means it only takes me five minutes to restore that partition,
    which would not be the case if the files were bloated and spread all
    over the partition. The restored OSX is bootable, has all the
    configuration settings intact, and even restores all the critical
    housekeeping main-disk files like the disk-driver, main partition-map,
    Apple patch-files, and myriad other data associated with the entire
    disk, not just the OSX partition _on_ the disk.

    As my OSX files increase over time, by adding more applications etc.
    and updating to the Jaguar OS, my installation will likely be closer to
    5-GBs instead of the present 3.19 GBs.

    That will increase my restore time to about 7 minutes on this slow
    Pismo powerbook.

    In summation, in my case "rebuilding the desktop" is just one of the
    many steps I take prior to creating a major "mirror" backup of my OSX
    partition.

    I also remove the cache files, remove the CUPS error files, do the
    daily/weekly/monthly menial maintenance rebuilding, flushing, and
    "rotating" of log files, databases, etc. (I use the scripts in a
    utility named "tail" to do this)

    Then I jam all the OSX files into one corner of my 12 GB partition
    (using SpeedDisk), rebuild the desktop, check and repair the directory
    with DiskWarrior version 2.1.1, and as a last step I "SpeedDisk" again
    to wipe free space on the OSX partition.

    All the above takes literally hours, mainly due to how slow the older
    version of DiskWarrior runs.

    I do all the above to make OSX as small as possible prior to creating a
    major backup. (I use Terminal's dd command to create the backup)



    It is all worth it to me, however, because I gain back the time when I
    do the speedy 5 minute restores. One major backup is done about once a
    month, and at least 100 restores are done for each one backup.

    About the only effective way I have of learning all this Unix crap is
    to experiment, and my experiments often backfire, so I have a _lot_
    of use for my mirror restores.<g>

    Mark-

    The dd backup file itself is 3.42 GBs in size, Stuffit compressed
    version is 1.11-GB in size.
    Mark Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article
    <comcast.giganews.com>, Tom
    Stiller <net> wrote:
     
    >
    > Wouldn't it be easier to just learn how to use OS X rather than
    > destroying it 3 times a day by undisciplined experimentation?[/ref]

    No, at least not what I want to learn about OSX.

    Mainly a comprehensive tutorial on "OSX-specific" Terminal commands,
    with their many confusing options and arguments.

    ....man pages and Google searches do not even come close to getting
    someone like me on board to actually being able to use those commands.

    ....that leaves experimentation now, doesn't it :-(

    Mark-
    Mark Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <250820031938073112%com>,
    Mark Conrad <com> wrote:
     

    I would regard multiple trashings per day of active experimentation as
    fully sufficient evidence that I was going about it wrong. I
    occasionally managed to do it while fooling around with Windows 95 and
    98 in probably unsound ways; I haven't with OS X, despite occasional
    bouts of almost certainly unsound actions. I am impressed by your
    willingness to persist in a course of action that leaves you
    ill-informed while doing much more harm to your gear than anyone else
    around, just not impressed _favorably_. The fact that you manage to do
    so much damage while still learning so little of actual utility just
    makes it that much more impressive.

    --
    Writer of Fortune
    Journal: http://bruceb.livejournal.com/
    "Everything possible to be believ'd is an image of truth."
    Bruce Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    Hah, hah, ha... Good one, Mark.
    In more simplistic terms, you cannot rebuild the desktop in OS X, unless
    you wish to risk incurring the wrath of the UNIX kernel, and really mess
    things up! Seriously mess things up.
    All of which means there really IS no functional equivalent for OS 9 and
    below's "rebuild desktop."
    If you have a problem with OS X that you have attributed to something
    being munged, it's best to use some formal, commercial program for
    locating and fixing it, isn't it?

    Thanks, keith whaley

    Mark Conrad wrote: 
    [...]
     
    >
    > Yep, but "we" did not get anywhere, no progress.<g>
    >
    > In this thread, the problem was resolved, thanks to James Meiss.
    >
    > To rebuild desktop in OS 10.2 and newer -
    > (warning, different for OS 10.1)
    >
    > Basically, discard these two files from OSX root:
    >
    > /Library/Caches/com.apple.LaunchServices.UserCache.csstore
    > (equivilent to OS9's "Desktop DB" file)
    >
    > /Library/Preferences/com.apple.LaunchServices.plist
    > (equivilent to OS9's "Desktop DF" file)
    >
    > After discarding, it is advisable to look at the OSX partition with
    > Norton's "Disk Editor X" to make certain the files are no longer there.
    >
    > Then upon reboot into OSX root, the OSX (operating system) will install
    > brand new versions of the above two files.
    >
    > There are a few gotchas involved, so anyone contemplating doing this
    > should get the rest of the details, unless they know exactly what they
    > are doing. Be happy to supply such details.
    >
    > WARNING: Severe damage can be done to OSX, if one messes this up.
    >
    > It is assumed that one is comfortable using the root account, using
    > Norton's "Disk Editor X", and using Apple's "Terminal".
    >
    > Mark-[/ref]
    Keith Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <tph-97D63A.21103225082003localhost>, Tom Harrington
    <no.spam.dammit.net> wrote:
     
    >
    > A bit of planning, and yes, man pages can go a long way toward
    > avoiding that kind of trouble.[/ref]

    For you perhaps, but not for me.

    What would do it for me would be a very large tutorial book, or series
    of books, about the 900 Terminal commands like dd, specific to the Mac
    OS and the default tcsh shell, fully explaining all the options and
    arguments to those commands, with copious written examples of their
    usage in practical situations.

    Any advanced Unix-head who already knows that stuff could field such a
    book, but no such book seems to be available.
    (not even an electronic version of such a book, which could make the
    author a bundle of money)

     
    >
    > I suppose it does, and yet at the same time I've never trashed a system
    > by experimenting with the command line.[/ref]

    Well I seldom do either, a full-n trashing, that is; but I prefer
    to err on the safe side after my experimentation and restore the OSX
    partition just in case I did some minor damage.

    I usually experiment for hours, so it is not really a hardship for me
    to spend 5 minutes at the end to fully restore the OSX partition.

    Mark-
    Mark Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <newsguy.com>, Bruce
    Baugh <com> wrote:
     
    >
    > I would regard multiple trashings per day of active experimentation as
    > fully sufficient evidence that I was going about it wrong.[/ref]

    Forgive me, but I don't see you offering any "right" way to learn, so I
    guess I have to continue bumbling along with my "wrong" way.

    The man pages were never intended to be a tutorial, but merely to jog
    someone's memory who already knows how to use those commands and their
    myriad optional arguments.

    The best way of learning those commands that I have found so far is to
    ask questions in these newsgroups, supplemented by experimentation.

    That is a slow and painful way of learning. Seems to me that a book
    or series of books would be a much faster way to learn.

    The out-and-out Unix and Linux books at my local bookstore do not seem
    to address the subject either.

    For example, I know a tiny bit about the dd command, but when I looked
    it up in those Unix books it was either missing altogether from the
    index, or only mentioned briefly and incompletely.

     

    The damage does not bother me because a five-minute dd restore gets rid
    of the damage.

    I do manage to learn a little, and what I learn has utility for me.

    For example, the dd command as applied to backup and restore benefits
    me directly. (and every day)

    To get that dd command to work correctly took a lot of experimentation,
    over and above the advice I received in these forums.

    Now that I can semi-use the dd command, I only have about 899 more
    commands to learn. Lemme see, it took me approx' four months to
    "learn" dd - at that rate it will take me 300 years to learn the rest
    of the commands.

    Most of what I learn comes from advice I receive in these newsgroups,
    either by my asking direct questions, or by others here correcting my
    misconceptions.

    Mark-
    Mark Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <com>, Keith Whaley
    <com> wrote:
     

    I am just going by what is advertised as being the equivalent files in
    OSX to the two desktop files "Desktop DB" and "Desktop DF" (in OS9)

    ....according to this website:

    www.westwind.com/reference/OS-X/where-files.html


    As far as messing up the UNIX kernel, nothing like that happened when I
    discarded the following two OSX equivalent files:

    /Library/Caches/com.apple.LaunchServices.UserCache.csstore

    /Library/Preferences/com.apple.LaunchServices.plist

    ....the equivilent OSX files for "Desktop DB" and "Desktop DF"

    (according to that website)


    I was certain that the two OSX files were indeed discarded, because
    inspection by Norton's "Disk Editor X" revealed their _absence_ from
    my hard drive after I discarded them.

    Upon subsequent restart of OSX, it merely replaced fresh copies of
    those two OSX files into their appropriate directories on my hard
    drive.

     

    I seem to have pulled it off. Consider, I discarded the files, OSX
    replaced the discarded files with fresh pristine copies.

    If that is not rebuilding, I don't know what is.

    Mark-
    Mark Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <250820031625597805%com>,
    Mark Conrad <com> wrote:
     
    > >
    > > Given that you apparently managed to do something...
    > >
    > > So what?[/ref]
    >
    > I thought you would never ask ;-)
    >
    > Generally, as you observed, one can get along fine "forever" without
    > worrying about rebuilding the desktop, in OSX or even in OS9, for that
    > matter.
    >
    > Even if trouble points towards corrupted desktop files as being the
    > culprit, then I can always backup my entire OSX partition in five
    > minutes, without diddling around with "rebuilding the desktop".
    > (which would take longer than five minutes, BTW)
    >
    > Despite all the above, there are valid reasons for rebuilding the
    > desktop files, in special cases.
    >
    > Assuming the desktop files in OSX store the same type of general
    > information as they did in OS9, as the website at :
    >
    > www.westwind.com/reference/OS-X/where-files.html
    >
    > ...implies they do, then the OSX desktop files can get bloated over
    > time. This is because the desktop file retains information about
    > deleted files, and that now-useless data keeps building up as more and
    > more files are deleted in the course of normal operation.[/ref]

    When do you get a chance to delete any files? As stated below, you only
    perform the [full, not incremental] backup once a month and you restore
    the system an average of 3 times a day; when is there any chance for
    anything on the disk to change?
     

    So, it's important to "literally hours" making a backup so you can spend
    more than 8 hours a month restoring the volume from the same backup over
    and over and over again. 

    About that, did you ever consider that DW 2.x and 3.0 use different
    operation systems and those different operating systems make different
    use of the hardware and that since DW 3.0 fails for you in every boot
    configuration (as described at great length in another post), that there
    may something borderline in your hardware? Maybe RAM or the memory
    mapping hardware? 
    [additional justification snipped]

    --
    Tom Stiller

    PGP fingerprint = 5108 DDB2 9761 EDE5 E7E3
    7BDA 71ED 6496 99C0 C7CF
    Tom Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <260820030446018773%com>,
    Mark Conrad <com> wrote:
     
    > >
    > > A bit of planning, and yes, man pages can go a long way toward
    > > avoiding that kind of trouble.[/ref]
    >
    > For you perhaps, but not for me.
    >
    > What would do it for me would be a very large tutorial book, or series
    > of books, about the 900 Terminal commands like dd, specific to the Mac
    > OS and the default tcsh shell, fully explaining all the options and
    > arguments to those commands, with copious written examples of their
    > usage in practical situations.[/ref]

    You won't ever find a book like that. At just one page per command, it
    would run to 900 pages and many commands have multi-page descriptions.
    In addition, new commands are added each day. A cursory look at my fink
    directory shows more than 1300 commands that could replace or augment
    the existing command set. 

    I don't think it would make a dime for the author. The effort to
    produce such a tome and to keep it up to date would push the price so
    high that only libraries could afford it. Even then, I would be
    surprised if more than a handful of people would bother with it.

    The "advanced Unix-heads" who know this stuff learned it command by
    command as they needed to perform the action supported by the command(s). 
    > >
    > > I suppose it does, and yet at the same time I've never trashed a system
    > > by experimenting with the command line.[/ref]
    >
    > Well I seldom do either, a full-n trashing, that is; but I prefer
    > to err on the safe side after my experimentation and restore the OSX
    > partition just in case I did some minor damage.
    >
    > I usually experiment for hours, so it is not really a hardship for me
    > to spend 5 minutes at the end to fully restore the OSX partition.[/ref]

    Do you experiment with potentially system-destroying root level commands
    exclusively or are you just so insecure in the unix environment that you
    can't trust the operating to constrain the possible damage to a
    "sandbox" directory or dummy user?

    --
    Tom Stiller

    PGP fingerprint = 5108 DDB2 9761 EDE5 E7E3
    7BDA 71ED 6496 99C0 C7CF
    Tom Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

     

    thats pretty much how it (sort of) works.

    read more:
    <http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=20030305025744788>

    which explains the sheer convoluted design.
    nospam Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    In article <260820030832223705%invalid>, nospam
    <invalid> wrote:
     
    >
    > thats pretty much how it (sort of) works.
    >
    > read more:
    > <http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=20030305025744788>
    >
    > which explains the sheer convoluted design.[/ref]


    I read the articles in that website, and... YE GADS, WHAT A MESS !

    Anyone who still thinks there is any logic behind Apple's present
    method of controlling and remembering window size, window location on
    the desktop, icon attributes, icon locations on the desktop, get-info
    comments - - -

    ....should take a long hard look at the articles in that website.

    It will disillusion the most diehard Apple apologists.

    I can't imagine how Apple can even begin to clean up this illogical
    mess by the time that OS 10.3 comes out.

    The articles in the website above did not even mention the file in this
    location:

    /Library/Caches/com.apple.LaunchServices.UserCache.csstore

    ....which is supposed to keep track of info' pertaining to icons,
    according to the website refered to in my prior posts.
    (equivalent to OS9's "Desktop DB" file)

    I give up. It appears to be impossible to rebuild the desktop files
    in OSX, given the present mess that Apple has made out of the systems
    that are supposed to control and remember stuff associated with icons,
    window sizes and locations, and get-info' comments.



    ....and this website made it sound so easy, to find the OSX equivalent
    files to OS9's "Desktop DB" and "Desktop DF" files:

    www.westwind.com/reference/OS-X/where-files.html


    Oh well, back to the drawing board.

    What primarily bothers me about this whole situation is that in OS9 the
    desktop files kept growing in size, whenever files were deleted and
    other files added.

    The references to the old deleted files were kept, even though the
    files were no longer on disk.

    This meant that the desktop files kept growing in size, which was one
    reason to "rebuild the desktop", in order to get rid of the old invalid
    references to deleted files that were no longer on disk.

    This "rebuilding" sidesteped the delays that would otherwise be caused
    by the OS having to wade through hundreds or thousands of deleted file
    references, in order to find icon info' for any given file.

    Apple themselves stated if one noticed significant slowdown, then
    "rebuilding the desktop" might eliminate the slowdown.

    Now I don't know if OSX "desktop files" also keep growing in size, like
    their OS9 counterparts.

    An experiment is called for in OSX - - - Some sort of automatic script
    that will add and delete files.

    Then later I can notice if any of the "desktop" files mentioned in this
    thread became bloated in size enough to slow down the normal operation
    of OSX.

    Mark-
    Mark Guest

  20. #20

    Default Re: "Rebuild Desktop" in OSX?

    Mark Conrad <com> wrote:
     

    There is no such book, and the reason there is no such book is because it
    would be found useful by a vanishingly small number of people.

    However, I hereby offer to write such a book. I think I'm qualified, since
    I'm a Unix Professional. However, since I think you are the only one who
    would want to buy it, I would of course expect you to foot the entire bill.
    I'll deliver it as a high-quality PDF, in about a year, but I'll need a
    six-figure check from you, up front, before I start work. Email if you're
    interested. Since OS X 10.3 is coming soon, I'll make sure it covers that
    version.
     

    Even when I was a Unix newbie, not once, not ever, not a single time, did
    I trash a system due to experimentation.

    What I find amazing is that, after all this time, you seem to have learned
    nothing and made no progress at all, and are still posting the same whiny
    rants about how you need to learn every single option to every single Unix
    command in order to use OS X, and that there should be a way to do that
    without actually learning Unix.

    --
    Jeremy | com
    Jeremy Guest

Page 1 of 12 12311 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Can't create PS file - "no desktop printer exists for this spool type"
    By Trudie_Derbyshire@adobeforums.com in forum Adobe Acrobat Macintosh
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: July 29th, 03:07 PM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: September 15th, 02:53 PM
  3. Replies: 5
    Last Post: August 19th, 06:06 PM
  4. MX is showing "Desktop" in my local files list?
    By tradmusic in forum Macromedia Dreamweaver
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: July 29th, 01:03 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139