Professional Web Applications Themes

Recommended video card for Redhat - Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration

So get this. Each time you upgrade your kernel, you get to struggle upgrading your Nvidia video drivers once again too. Isn't that nice. And they have a really difficult time installing with more than one kernel on the machine. I'm fed up. I just expect the video card to WORK. It is most fundamental. Can anyone recommend a plain vanilla video card (no TVs, etc.) that just -works- with Redhat? AGP please. Ideally, when you install Redhat, it should just install without any thought or action on a human's part. No drivers to download. NO multiple 55 page manuals ...

  1. #1

    Default Recommended video card for Redhat

    So get this. Each time you upgrade your kernel,
    you get to struggle upgrading your Nvidia video
    drivers once again too. Isn't that nice.

    And they have a really difficult time installing
    with more than one kernel on the machine.

    I'm fed up. I just expect the video card to WORK.
    It is most fundamental.


    Can anyone recommend a plain vanilla video card
    (no TVs, etc.) that just -works- with Redhat?
    AGP please.


    Ideally, when you install Redhat, it should just
    install without any thought or action on a
    human's part. No drivers to download. NO multiple
    55 page manuals to read. No 4 dozen RPM options to
    read about and consider. NO posting to newsgroups
    to make. NO emails to tech support who neither
    understand or answer the question.... I just
    want it to work. First time. Every time.


    You have to hand it to Mr. Bill, it's very rigourous
    on Windows. When you want to install a video driver,
    you just install the driver. Total time, about 10 minutes.
    And what works for one, works for almost all.

    Why must Nvidia's drivers tie into the base operating
    system kernel? Why are they not self contained, separate
    from the kernel?


    Thanks
    linuxquestion@yahoo.com Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Recommended video card for Redhat

    In comp.os.linux.hardware com wrote: 

    No. Every time you build a new kernel, you cd into the directory:
    [wherever you unpacked the nvidia driver]/NVIDIA-(version)/usr/src/nv/
    Read the README in that directory, then
    $ make
    a new interface module for nVidia, nvidia.o, then copy it across to
    the relevant
    /lib/modules/(kernel version)/kernel/drivers/video/
    directory.
     

    If the kernel versions are different, ie you have a 2.4.21, a 2.4.22
    then you build a 2.4.24 you'll have an nvidia.o in each place, and
    each will suit the relevant kernel.

    If you are playing with multiple kernels of the same version, you'll
    have the potential for module conflicts in general. That's not
    confined to the nvidia module. Some modules compile differently
    depening upon kernel configuration options. Using some with a
    different kernel can cause some interesting effects...
     

    Because they perform as well as they do _because_ of the way they
    are tied into the kernel.

    --
    Athol
    <http://cust.idl.com.au/athol>
    Linux Registered User # 254000
    I'm a Libran Engineer. I don't argue, I discuss.
    athol Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Recommended video card for Redhat

    athol <net> writes:
     
    >
    > Because they perform as well as they do _because_ of the way they
    > are tied into the kernel.[/ref]

    It's not about performance. The kernel drivers are there for the same
    reason all the 3D drivers have a kernel part. The function of the
    kernel module is to manage DMA transfers to the video card. The
    reason this needs to be done by the kernel is that the physical
    address of the source needs to be known, and there is no way to find
    this information from userspace. If the memory mapping was accessible
    from userspace it would perform equally well there.

    --
    Måns Rullgård
    se
    Måns Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Recommended video card for Redhat

    com wrote:
     

    I have a Radeon 9000 card, and it "just works" without any extra driver
    installation.
     

    The driver must access the card hardware directly, that's why there must
    be a component that runs as a kernel module.
    nVidia refuses to tell Linux developers how their cards work, that's why
    the driver can't be included in the standard kernel like the Radeon DRM
    module.

    --
    Markku Kolkka
    fi
    Markku Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Recommended video card for Redhat

    On Sat, 10 Jan 2004 22:30:59 -0800, linuxquestion wrote:
     

    All the Nvidia cards I have ever owned have worked well with Red Hat out
    of the box just using the default nv driver that comes with XFree86. The
    ONLY reason you may need the Nvidia drivers is if you also need to use
    accelerated 3D. If you don't need that you don't need the Nvidia drivers
    from Nvidia.

    IF you DO need accelerated 3D then you DO need the Nvidia drivers.

    When the kernel is upgraded the driver module has to be rebuilt to match
    the kernel. This is as simple as running (as root):

    sh NVIDIA-driver-you-downloaded

    and answering a few yes/no questions then switching back to the GUI
    runlevel:

    telinit 5

    Whole process takes about 30 seconds.

    To make this process even simpler I just keep the the Nvidia driver
    installer I downloaded in my /root directory. When I install a new kernel
    and reboot I tell grub to boot to runlevel 3 (console mode). Just hit "a"
    when the grub screen comes up and then "3" and Enter. It is really REALLY
    easy.

    Incidentally Nvidia uses the same driver for Linux as it does for Windows.

    The driver works well out of the box... if you want to tweak it for some
    reason, yes, you will have to read the excellent docs that Nvidia supplies
    in order to find out what the tweaks are.

    Again if you don't need accelerated 3D, which you only need for some games
    and engineering/scientific apps... then just use the stock nv diver and
    skip all the (minor) hassle.

    For me, Nvidia cards are some of the best out there. I have had very good
    use out of them.

    -DU-...etc...
    David Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Recommended video card for Redhat

    Well, I finally got it to work.

    rpm -qa | grep -i kernel | sort

    kernel-2.4.20-18.10.1
    kernel-2.4.20-18.10.1
    ....

    kernel-source-2.4.20-18.10.1

    ....
    kernel-2.4.9-e.3
    kernel-source-2.4.9-e.3
    kernel-summit-2.4.9-e.3
    kernel-utils-2.4-6

    Hmm. Two kernel-2.4.20-18.10.1 kernels!

    Remove them both.

    rpm -e --allmatches --nodeps kernel-2.4.20-18.10.1


    Reinstall. Interestingly enough, by installing the .src file,
    it doesn't install the kernel.

    rpm -ivh --nodeps kernel-2.4.20-18.10.1.src.rpm
    1:kernel ########################################### [100%]

    rpm -qa | grep -i kernel | sort
    - not there


    Install the binary, and source:

    rpm -ivh --nodeps kernel-2.4.20-18.10.1.i686.rpm

    Preparing... ########################################### [100%]
    1:kernel ########################################### [100%]


    rpm -ivh --nodeps kernel-source-2.4.20-18.10.1.i386.rpm

    Preparing... ########################################### [100%]
    1:kernel-source ########################################### [100%]


    --------------

    I managed to find the old nvidia package:
    NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-4496-pkg2.run

    I reboot to the new kernel, and run install.sh

    sh NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-4496-pkg2.run

    - worked!
    - about time. It should have taken 10 to 20 minutes, but I
    finally finished about after 2 days. Somewhere between 10
    to 20 hours of struggle. Directly related to Nvidia drivers.

    I will never buy nvidia cards intentionally again.


    ---------------


    com wrote in message news:<google.com>... 
    linuxquestion@yahoo.com Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Recommended video card for Redhat

    > All the Nvidia cards I have ever owned have worked well with Red Hat out 

    Well, all I'm trying to do is X Windows. I don't think that is 3D.
    But if we define it as so, it is not so simple.

     

    How many times did you do it before you got it to this time?

    It's taken me between 10 to 20 hours. In retrospect, I had a problem
    of two kernels. But why didn't I get a better error messages?
    From either linux, or from the nvidia scripts?

    I'm glad it's "just that simple" for you. Please continue to
    post the short and experienced instructions for the rest of us.
    linuxquestion@yahoo.com Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Recommended video card for Redhat

    On 10 Jan 2004 22:30:59 -0800, com Gave us:
     

    Nvidia has single file drivers now that are one button press and
    play affairs.

    Uninstalls any existing, installs new. No Problemo.

    By far the best as well.
    DarkMatter Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Recommended video card for Redhat

    On 11 Jan 2004 18:02:40 -0800, com Gave us:
     
    >
    >Well, all I'm trying to do is X Windows. I don't think that is 3D.
    >But if we define it as so, it is not so simple.
    >

    >
    >How many times did you do it before you got it to this time?
    >
    >It's taken me between 10 to 20 hours. In retrospect, I had a problem
    >of two kernels. But why didn't I get a better error messages?
    >From either linux, or from the nvidia scripts?
    >
    >I'm glad it's "just that simple" for you. Please continue to
    >post the short and experienced instructions for the rest of us.[/ref]

    I ALWAYS boot to command console, and run startx on my own. That
    way I can install drivers that xwindows may interfere with.

    Regardless, the new NVIDI drivers go in very easily. You may be
    thinking of the old manner they used to require for installation.

    Now, it is a single file.

    Works fine on my dual athlon. :]

    good luck.
    DarkMatter Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Recommended video card for Redhat

    In comp.os.linux.hardware DarkMatter <org> wrote:
     

    On my systems that _have_ X, I default to it (runlevel 4 in
    slackware). If I want to play with drivers, I simply feed
    the alternative runlevel to LILO while booting. If I'm
    testing a new kernel that I know won't work with the nVidia
    driver, I put an append line in lilo.conf to force a non-X
    runlevel for that kernel.

    --
    Athol
    <http://cust.idl.com.au/athol>
    Linux Registered User # 254000
    I'm a Libran Engineer. I don't argue, I discuss.
    athol Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Recommended video card for Redhat

    com wrote:
     

    A *.src.rpm file is used to build the binary rpms (including
    kernel-source in case of kernel*src.rpm), it doesn't install anything
    directly usable.

    --
    Markku Kolkka
    fi
    Markku Guest

Similar Threads

  1. video capture card for Flash live video stream
    By hsin chien in forum Macromedia Flash Flashcom
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 4th, 01:51 AM
  2. how much Video card?
    By Thomas_Lamourine@adobeforums.com in forum Adobe Photoshop Mac CS, CS2 & CS3
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May 19th, 01:10 AM
  3. Recommended Video card
    By ChrisHudson in forum Adobe Photoshop 7, CS, CS2 & CS3
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: September 17th, 09:57 PM
  4. trouble set up 2nd Ethernet card on Linux RedHat 7.0
    By K T in forum Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: August 25th, 08:47 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139