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Red eye or dog's eye - Adobe Photoshop Elements

I am trying to remove the "green" from my dogs eye. But I also have this problem in red eyes of people. I follow the dirctions from the help menu in picking the target color and replacement color - going to the sampling menu and I tried all that and it doesn't fix it. Nothing changes. I want to fill in with black and all it will fill in with is the color of the greenish eye. Can someone explain step by step how to pick the color you want to put in the eye?...

  1. #1

    Default Red eye or dog's eye

    I am trying to remove the "green" from my dogs eye. But I also have this problem in red eyes of people. I follow the dirctions from the help menu in picking the target color and replacement color - going to the sampling menu and I tried all that and it doesn't fix it. Nothing changes. I want to fill in with black and all it will fill in with is the color of the greenish eye. Can someone explain step by step how to pick the color you want to put in the eye?
    Patti Nykamp Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Red eye or dog's eye

    Patti,
    Try this technique:
    1. Open image
    2. Create new layer at top of stack and change mode to Saturation
    3. Choose black as foreground color
    4. Select painting tool, zoom in on eyes, and paint only green or red part with brush
    5. Duplicate this layer and change mode to overlay
    6. Adjust opacity of overlay layer to effect intensity of darkening
    You might try Softlight, Darken or Multiply mode for step 5 for different effects. If you want some red or green to come through, adjust Opacity of the Saturation layer in steps 2-4
    Ken
    Kenneth Liffmann Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Red eye or dog's eye

    "Patti Nykamp" <PattiChatiaol.com> wrote in message
    news:2ccd4930.-1webx.la2eafNXanI...
    > [...] Can someone explain step by step how to pick the color you want to
    put in the eye?

    The red eye tool can produce some pretty subtle results at first, especially
    when you've never used it before. Four things are important:

    * "Tolerance" controls how close to the original "red" (or "green") a
    color needs to be before Elements will adjust the color
    * The "replacement" color is the color that will be used as a substitute
    for the "red" color.
    * The "red" color can be selected when you first click the tool in your
    image. There's a checkbox that controls this behavior, and I think it's set
    to "First click" by default.
    * The red eye tool has a brush, just like some of the other tools. If
    your brush is too small, it may be hard to see any results at first, and it
    may be hard to get complete coverage over the "red" part.

    You can pick any color as the replacement color, but I've found that black
    (the default) works just great.

    As far as "tolerance" goes, for most things I've found that numbers in the
    low tens (10-30 or so) seem to work well. Basically, if you find the tool
    is leaving some part of the "red" unchanged, you need a higher number, and
    if you find that the tool is modifying areas outside the "red" (such as the
    iris), you need a lower number.

    I like have a brush size that's about half the size of the pupil, but this
    really depends on how steady a hand you have and how long you want to spend
    fixing the eye. With the tolerance set correctly, it shouldn't matter if
    you can't quite keep "in the lines" with the brush.

    Click in the "red" part, trying to aim for a pixel that's roughly in the
    middle of the range of "red" shades in the pupil. Without letting up on the
    mouse button, drag the brush around the pupil. For each pixel, the tool
    will use the hue of the replacement color in place of the existing pixel's
    hue to come up with a new color that will replace the current color of that
    pixel.

    Some notes:

    * You'll find that, because of the way it works, this tool doesn't deal
    with "red eye" that's really just a really bright white. You just get a
    really bright shade of black (or whatever you chose for your replacement
    color), which turns out to be not a lot different (if at all) from the
    original white.

    * I put "red" in quotes everywhere, because it doesn't matter what color
    the "red eye" really is (unless it's bright white). The tool works equally
    well on people, cats, dogs, whatever.

    Pete


    Peter Duniho Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Red eye or dog's eye

    Just for fun,,,,
    <http://www.pbase.com/image/20253603>
    Jane
    Jane Carter Guest

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