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Remote connections - SCO

A customer has an OSR 5.0.6 machine, connected to the outside world only via modem. Inside the premises, many people run Windows machines and work on the Unix box over a LAN (192.168.1.0/24) using the Anzio terminal emulator. He now needs to connect four people in a satellite office. T1s are on the map for next year, but not at the moment. Giving each of those four satellite Windows boxes a modem implies four telephone lines, plus four modems back at the head office, and a serial board to handle them, not to mention four sets of telco charges to ...

  1. #1

    Default Remote connections

    A customer has an OSR 5.0.6 machine, connected to the outside world only
    via modem.

    Inside the premises, many people run Windows machines and work on the
    Unix box over a LAN (192.168.1.0/24) using the Anzio terminal emulator.

    He now needs to connect four people in a satellite office. T1s are on
    the map for next year, but not at the moment.

    Giving each of those four satellite Windows boxes a modem implies four
    telephone lines, plus four modems back at the head office, and a serial
    board to handle them, not to mention four sets of telco charges to stay
    connected during the working day.

    I was thinking of putting the satellite machines on a 192.168.2.0/24 LAN
    with a Unix server, and having that Unix server use PPP back to the main
    office's Unix machine. The satellite Unix would have a 192.168.1.xx
    address on its PPP connection, but be 192.168.2.1 on its NIC, and it
    would use NAT to let the 192.168.2.0/24 machines share its 192.168.1.xx
    PPP connection. Only one telco connection would then be used.

    Would a leased line be cheaper than a 40-hour/week dial-up connection
    (this is Verizon, in NYC)?

    Is there a better way altogether, both as to cost and as to complexity?

    --
    JP
    Jean-Pierre Guest

  2. #2

    Default RE: Remote connections

    Jean-Pierre Radley wrote: 

    I'm only thowing this up as another alternative, not the best (or even
    all that great). But it might work in the short run.

    One dialup is going to be pretty sluggish for 4 people, even with
    character based terminals. IF you can get ISDN in that area for
    a reasonable cost, try to pick up some used ISDN modems on Ebay and have
    one location call the other. Just like a POTS modem, only faster. (With
    both "B" channels connected, 128Kbps.)

    This would be more secure than over the Internet (without VPN, etc),
    however,
    for the cost of 2 ISDN locations, you can probably get 2 DSL's. Assuming
    you are within about 14,000 feet from the CO at both locations. If not,
    ISDN is a fairly good alternative - as you can pretty much get it anywhere.

    Just a thought.

    Bill

    Bill Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Remote connections


    "Jean-Pierre Radley" <com> wrote in message
    news:jpr.com... 

    Would you need the unix server at the remote office? It might be easier to
    use the built in windows internet connection sharing (ICS) if you are
    running 2000 and XP. That way you don't incur the cost of an additional
    machine. You simply dial up from the one machine and tell the other
    machines to use that one as a gateway. Any non-local addresses will
    automatically go out over the ICS line. Do they have internet access at the
    satellite via a separate connection? If so, there could be issues with ICS
    interfering with other network requests. Another issue is that ICS forces
    you to use 192.168.0.1 for the internal addresses IIRC.

    Maybe I am oversimplifying, but that seems like it might work. Especially
    since you will have a T1 in about a year.

    Just a thought

    Justin


    Justin Guest

  4. Moderated Post

    Default Re: Remote connections

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    Scott Guest
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  5. Moderated Post

    Default Re: Remote connections

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    Justin Guest
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  6. #6

    Default Re: Remote connections

    Jean-Pierre Radley wrote: 


    For serial only connections I have used a Digi C/X in remote mode.
    Basically a C/X controller is installed into the main server, and
    a cable runs over to a RS232 modem/ISDN TA/CSU-DSU in sync mode.
    At the remote end a matching modem is cabled to the C/X concentrator,
    and you have "local" serial login ports ( or printer ports ).
    The performance seems to be better on slow links that run simple
    terminal sessions than using PPP, the Digi protocol gets around the
    56byte+ packet for every keystroke problem with TCP/IP. I have
    connected up to 6 38400 baud terminals ( or PCs ) across one
    33.6 link and generally there was no slowdown.

    You should be able to find a Digi C/X setup used for around $200,
    and old 33.6 modems based on the Rockwell chipset had a sync mode.

    Mike

    --
    Michael Brown

    The Kingsway Group
    Mike Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Remote connections

    Bill Andersen <com> wrote in message news:<com>... 
    >
    > I'm only thowing this up as another alternative, not the best (or even
    > all that great). But it might work in the short run.
    >
    > One dialup is going to be pretty sluggish for 4 people, even with
    > character based terminals. IF you can get ISDN in that area for
    > a reasonable cost, try to pick up some used ISDN modems on Ebay and have
    > one location call the other. Just like a POTS modem, only faster. (With
    > both "B" channels connected, 128Kbps.)
    >
    > This would be more secure than over the Internet (without VPN, etc),
    > however,
    > for the cost of 2 ISDN locations, you can probably get 2 DSL's. Assuming
    > you are within about 14,000 feet from the CO at both locations. If not,
    > ISDN is a fairly good alternative - as you can pretty much get it anywhere.
    >
    > Just a thought.
    >
    > Bill[/ref]

    I think this is likely a job for ssh and the open internet.
    Connect each end to internet with isdn or dsl or cable or any mixture
    you like
    and put an inexpensive (Linksys) router/firewall at each end and off
    you go fast (for the most part), cheap, and pretty secure (spend the
    time to set the firewall settings properly). For 4 or probably 24
    users you won't need the t1's.
    Regards...Dan.
    Dan Guest

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