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Request for discussion: Migrating from Sun to Linux/Solaris on x86 - Sun Solaris

As part of some cost-cutting and consolidating measures, I am trying to evaluate the pros/cons of migrating away from our current Sun hardware running solaris systems to a Intel-based systems running Solaris x86 or even Linux. First, Solaris on x86 Is this a free product? Does Sun or other resellers provide support for it? Does Sun issue patches for this as frequently as Solaris on Sparc? In other words, does Sun treat this on par with Sparc Solaris or as a distant cousin? How does the performance compare to Solaris on Sparc? How does it handle multiple CPUs? Does it ...

  1. #1

    Default Request for discussion: Migrating from Sun to Linux/Solaris on x86

    As part of some cost-cutting and consolidating measures, I am trying to
    evaluate the pros/cons of migrating away from our current Sun hardware
    running solaris systems to a Intel-based systems running Solaris x86 or
    even Linux.

    First, Solaris on x86

    Is this a free product? Does Sun or other resellers provide support for it?
    Does Sun issue patches for this as frequently as Solaris on Sparc?

    In other words, does Sun treat this on par with Sparc Solaris or as a
    distant cousin?

    How does the performance compare to Solaris on Sparc? How does it handle
    multiple CPUs? Does it scale well?

    Next, Linux on x86

    Is this really a feasible choice? Does Linux perform well on a enterprise-
    class server with, say, 8 cpus and >8GB of memory? Does it use all cPUs
    well?

    [FYI, my interest is entirely in the context of running Oracle databases, I
    know Oracle Corp is supporting Linux in a big way, but as a sysadmin/DBA, I
    want to get some real-world stories of any attempted large migrations away
    from Sun to x86/Linux]

    I am hoping that asking this question on a Sun newsgroup will get a more
    objective, balanced response compared to the hard-core Linux supporters on
    the Linux side of the world.

    Thanks



    Vikas Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Request for discussion: Migrating from Sun to Linux/Solaris on x86

    Vikas Agnihotri <mailshell.com> writes in comp.unix.solaris:
    |First, Solaris on x86
    |Is this a free product?

    Not for commercial use, though licenses are reasonably priced ($99 for
    a single CPU machine).

    |Does Sun or other resellers provide support for it?

    Yes, Sun does.

    |Does Sun issue patches for this as frequently as Solaris on Sparc?

    Yes.

    |How does the performance compare to Solaris on Sparc? How does it handle
    |multiple CPUs? Does it scale well?

    Performance depends on hardware & workload. The code is the same as
    Solaris/sparc, so it should scale as well as the hardware allows.

    |Is this really a feasible choice? Does Linux perform well on a enterprise-
    |class server with, say, 8 cpus and >8GB of memory? Does it use all cPUs
    |well?

    Never tried it on a machine that big, but from what I've heard it
    doesn't scale as well as Solaris - that's purely anedoctal though.

    |[FYI, my interest is entirely in the context of running Oracle databases, I
    |know Oracle Corp is supporting Linux in a big way, but as a sysadmin/DBA, I
    |want to get some real-world stories of any attempted large migrations away
    |from Sun to x86/Linux]

    Solaris/x86 has the disadvantage there that Oracle decided to skip
    relasing Oracle 9i for it - you can get Oracle 8 or wait for 10g.

    --
    __________________________________________________ ______________________
    Alan Coopersmith calberkeley.org
    http://www.CSUA.Berkeley.EDU/~alanc/ aka: COM
    Working for, but definitely not speaking for, Sun Microsystems, Inc.
    Alan Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Request for discussion: Migrating from Sun to Linux/Solaris on x86


    "Vikas Agnihotri" <mailshell.com> wrote in message
    news:fu-berlin.de... 
    it? 

    I think, even if I like Solaris , that migrating to Solaris Intel will put
    you in a direction without issue . With solaris 9 there was even a big
    discussion not to release solaris on intell . Sun has also choosen to go for
    Linux
    ( strange ... ) .
    Futhermore , if you go to x86 software , some production-software could not
    be available for x86 .
    So, you have to yze your software needs . I think that as you has Sun
    hardware and you want to consolidate your infrastructure , then remain
    with your hardware and rethink the configuration of your systems

    Pidbel



    pidbel Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Request for discussion: Migrating from Sun to Linux/Solaris on x86

    "pidbel" <be> wrote in message
    news:bm0gh0$mto$wanadoo.fr...
     
    not 

    This is a key point! When most software vendors announce availability of
    product on Solaris, it's assumed that Solaris = SPARC Solaris. If you use
    mainly open-source stuff then it's not an issue (since you can
    'roll-your-own'), but if you rely on off-the-shelf software, better check to
    see it supports Solaris x86 first.
    --
    Dave Ockwell-Jenner
    Solar Nexus Solutions
    http://www.solar-nexus.com/


    Dave Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Request for discussion: Migrating from Sun to Linux/Solaris on x86


    "Vikas Agnihotri" <mailshell.com> wrote in message
    news:fu-berlin.de... 
    it? 

    From what I understand, Sun is trying to align them both but I have no
    experience running Solaris on x86. 

    Sun is does support x86 and is putting a lot of weight behind it. But you
    have to keep in mind that becuase there is so much x86 hardware out there,
    you have to make sure that what you get is well supported in x86 Solaris.
     

    Once you go past 2 cpu's with x86, prices start to climb rapidly. Just out
    of my own curiosity, I took a look at Compaq DL760
    This was the config: 8 way with 2.8 Ghz Xeon cpus, 8GB RAM, 1 36GB Ultra320
    disk with no additional controllers etc... it comes out to $84,148.00

    Now if you take a look at V880, 8 way with 1.2 Ghz SPARC cpu's, 16 GB RAM, 6
    73GB FC-AL drives, it comes out to $85,995

    I would say that that from the initial cost of hardware, Sun V880 is a
    better deal. Also, V880 already comes with the OS but you'd still need to
    buy an OS for DL760, Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS will run you another $2500.

    All the prices are from Sun, HP, and Red Hat web sites.

     



    It really depends on your needs. If you have requirements for large boxes
    with 8+ cpu's, I am not sure that x86 is the way to go. You'll have to look
    at alot of things to make that decision. Large migrations are usually
    complex and are driven by requirements that you have to understand in order
    to make the correct decisions for the hardware.
     

    Give us some examples of your requirements so we can try to understand
    better what you are looking at.

    Victor


    Victor Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Request for discussion: Migrating from Sun to Linux/Solaris onx86

    On Wed, 8 Oct 2003, pidbel wrote:
     

    Careful there: Sun supports Linux, IN ADDITION TO Solaris x86,
    not instead of.

    --
    Rich Teer, SCNA, SCSA

    President,
    Rite Online Inc.

    Voice: +1 (250) 979-1638
    URL: http://www.rite-online.net
    Rich Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Request for discussion: Migrating from Sun to Linux/Solaris onx86

    Rich Teer <com> writes:
     
    >
    > Careful there: Sun supports Linux, IN ADDITION TO Solaris x86,
    > not instead of.[/ref]

    Yes, that's (thanks god) true. But, ironically, for some time it was
    INSTEAD of Solaris x86 :-(

    Bye, Dragan

    --
    Dragan Cvetkovic,

    To be or not to be is true. G. Boole No it isn't. L. E. J. Brouwer

    !!! Sender/From address is bogus. Use reply-to one !!!
    Dragan Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Request for discussion: Migrating from Sun to Linux/Solaris onx86

    Victor Karpovich wrote:
     

    And the new v440 makes the same situation come true when you compare the v440
    with 4 cpu X86 servers, The v440 is actually 10% cheaper than a
    comparable 4 CPU 16 GB x86 server + M$ Windows 2003 Enterprise licence.

    This is probably varies up and down depending on which country you in and
    Customs Fees....



    --
    ================================================== ======
    Lars Tunkrans
    smtp: lars dot tunkrans at bredband dot net
    --------------------------------------------------------

    Lars Guest

  9. Moderated Post

    Default Re: Request for discussion: Migrating from Sun to Linux/Solaris onx86

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    Rhugga Guest
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  10. #10

    Default Re: Request for discussion: Migrating from Sun to Linux/Solaris on x86

    > + On 08-Okt-03 00:48:18
    +Vikas Agnihotri <mailshell.com> wrote
     
     
     

    Well.. AFAIK it have a similar licence as the real Solaris (sparc)
     

    How do you mean support ? ..Ofcoz Sun supports it.. ?
     

    Yes.
     

    Until they decide to shutdown SolX86 the next time.. yes probably.. however
    thirdparty software for Solaris usally only exist for Sol/Sparc.
     

    No idea, I never used it on a SMP machine.. even if it would be fun to try..

     
     

    IMHO the SMP in linux is not really comparable with the "big" commercial
    unixes like Solaris.. Solaris (And IRIX and so on) are BUILT thinking
    of that it will be used on SMP machines, On linux it works, but it's
    more of a hack added afterwards..

    I run a Dual PPro200 with Linux here at home and I have never tried it
    on x86-machines with more CPU's (they are not very common for homeuse)
    and I think that even my old SS10 with 4 CPU's handles SMP alot better,
    and the large sunmachines (Enterprise series machines) at work is ofcoz
    even better..

    BUT, this large (>8CPU's) machines is usally not very much cheaper than
    sparcbased machines anyway.. Also my personal belief is that Solaris is
    ALOT cheaper and easier to administrate than Linux.


    First of all you probably should ask yourself "Where is the costs ?"
    the initial price of the machine is not that interesting, its the total
    cost of the machine INCLUDING OS, software, supportcontract, administrating
    and the expected lifetime of the hardware that is interesting really.

    (Dunno about the modern Sun hardware, but we have SS5/10 and Ultra1's at work
    that has been in use constantly every day since they where new and still works..)

    Glenn@canit.se Guest

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