"Logan Shaw" wrote in message news:X2ndb.148182$austin.rr.com...[ref] > Rob wrote:[ref] > > I need to restore my complete system fro tape , I am using ufsdump and > > backup entire vfstab which should be all file systems into a tape, now I > > need to replace entire system from tape into original locations. > > my question is if I use : > > #ufsrestore -xvf /dev/rmt/o > > will that take care of every thing?[/ref] > > No, that will only restore a single filesystem. Each ufsrestore > restores a single filesystem, and you need to run one for each > filesystem to restore. > > You should use /dev/rmt/0n and not /dev/rmt/o. (Note two differences: > "o" vs. "0", and the addition of the "n", which will avoid rewinding > the tape, so that you are at the position of the following filesystem.) >[ref] > > should I umount all file systemes in advance if so what is the command[/ref][/ref] to do[ref][ref] > > that.[/ref] > > If you are restoring a complete system, you should not have any > filesystems to unmount. You could restore over an existing system, > but that is the hard way. >[ref] > > Can I install a basic solaris with all default partition size and[/ref][/ref] settings[ref][ref] > > and then run the above ufsrestore command to restore all original[/ref][/ref] partitions[ref][ref] > > and file systems and folders from tape?[/ref] > > I don't know whether you can. That depends on whether your filesystems > would fit on those disk partitions. But certainly, even if you could, > that is the hard way! > > Here is the easy way: > > (1) Boot from the Solaris CD-ROM. Use "boot -s cdrom", so that you > don't start the installer and instead just get a prompt you can > use to run some commands. > > (2) Use "format" to make sure you have the partition tables you need. > In your case, your existing ones may be fine. > > (3) Run "newfs" on each partition to create a filesystem. For example, > you slice 0 is root, 1 is swap, 6 is /usr, and 7 is /export/home, > you might do something like this: > > for i in 0 6 7 > do > newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s"$i" > done > > Note that I didn't include slice 1; it's not a filesystem. > > (4) For every one of your filesystems, first mount it, then > restore the data, then unmount it. To continue the above > example: > > for i in 0 6 7 > do > echo "restoring slice $i" > mount -o logging /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s"$i" /mnt > cd /mnt > ufsrestore rf /dev/rmt/0n > rm restoresymtable > cd / > umount /mnt > done > > Note that this assumes the slices are on the tape in numerical > order. Obviously, if this isn't the case, you need to do > them in a different order. Also note that I've used "r" > instead of "x" and option to "ufsrestore". This works better > for restoring whole filesystems. Also, "-o logging" isn't > really necessary, but it will speed the restore up (because > restores change lots of filesystem metadata and logging helps > with that.) Also, the "restoresymtable" file helps with > incremental restores, so if you are not doing those, you can > just remove it. (If you are, the whole procedure is more > complicated.) > > At this point, you should have all your data back on your > filesystems, and the only thing you need to do is to make > the system bootable again. > > (5) Run installboot. You probably need to mount the root > filesystem first, with "mount /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0 /mnt" or > similar. The exact command varies. See the documentation > in "man installboot" or at http://docs.sun.com/ . > > Hope that helps. > > - Logan > -----------[/ref] please see ? --> Here is the easy way:[ref] > > (1) Boot from the Solaris CD-ROM. Use "boot -s cdrom", so that you > don't start the installer and instead just get a prompt you can > use to run some commands. > > (2) Use "format" to make sure you have the partition tables you need. > In your case, your existing ones may be fine. > > (3) Run "newfs" on each partition to create a filesystem. For example, > you slice 0 is root, 1 is swap, 6 is /usr, and 7 is /export/home, > you might do something like this: >[/ref] ? --> The backed up partitions are the same as existing partitions, should I still create new partitions? [ref] > for i in 0 6 7 > do > newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s"$i" > done > > Note that I didn't include slice 1; it's not a filesystem. > > (4) For every one of your filesystems, first mount it, then > restore the data, then unmount it. To continue the above > example: >[/ref] ? --> That means i can restore from tape only to a mounted partition, is that right? also, I am not familiar with script, how can I run this script? [ref] > for i in 0 6 7 > do > echo "restoring slice $i" > mount -o logging /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s"$i" /mnt > cd /mnt > ufsrestore rf /dev/rmt/0n > rm restoresymtable > cd / > umount /mnt > done > ? --> I am restoring from a full backup (ufsdump), so as you said I dont[/ref] need to use restoresymtable, do I? [ref] > Note that this assumes the slices are on the tape in numerical > order. Obviously, if this isn't the case, you need to do > them in a different order. Also note that I've used "r" > instead of "x" and option to "ufsrestore". This works better > for restoring whole filesystems. Also, "-o logging" isn't > really necessary, but it will speed the restore up (because > restores change lots of filesystem metadata and logging helps > with that.) Also, the "restoresymtable" file helps with > incremental restores, so if you are not doing those, you can > just remove it. (If you are, the whole procedure is more > complicated.) > > At this point, you should have all your data back on your > filesystems, and the only thing you need to do is to make > the system bootable again. > > (5) Run installboot. You probably need to mount the root > filesystem first, with "mount /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0 /mnt" or > similar. The exact command varies. See the documentation > in "man installboot" or at http://docs.sun.com/ . >[/ref] [allowsmilie] => 1 [showsignature] => 0 [ipaddress] => [iconid] => 0 [visible] => 1 [attach] => 0 [infraction] => 0 [reportthreadid] => 0 [isusenetpost] => 1 [msgid] => <3f761e0f$1@news.sentex.net> [ref] => <3f75edd7$1@news.sentex.net> [htmlstate] => on_nl2br [postusername] => Rob [ip] => rshahamat@hotma [isdeleted] => 0 [usergroupid] => [membergroupids] => [displaygroupid] => [password] => [passworddate] => [email] => [styleid] => [parentemail] => [homepage] => [icq] => [aim] => [yahoo] => [msn] => [skype] => [showvbcode] => [showbirthday] => [usertitle] => [customtitle] => [joindate] => [daysprune] => [lastvisit] => [lastactivity] => [lastpost] => [lastpostid] => [posts] => [reputation] => [reputationlevelid] => [timezoneoffset] => [pmpopup] => [avatarid] => [avatarrevision] => [profilepicrevision] => [sigpicrevision] => [options] => [akvbghsfs_optionsfield] => [birthday] => [birthday_search] => [maxposts] => [startofweek] => [referrerid] => [languageid] => [emailstamp] => [threadedmode] => [autosubscribe] => [pmtotal] => [pmunread] => [salt] => [ipoints] => [infractions] => [warnings] => [infractiongroupids] => [infractiongroupid] => [adminoptions] => [profilevisits] => [friendcount] => [friendreqcount] => [vmunreadcount] => [vmmoderatedcount] => [socgroupinvitecount] => [socgroupreqcount] => [pcunreadcount] => [pcmoderatedcount] => [gmmoderatedcount] => [assetposthash] => [fbuserid] => [fbjoindate] => [fbname] => [logintype] => [fbaccesstoken] => [newrepcount] => [vbseo_likes_in] => [vbseo_likes_out] => [vbseo_likes_unread] => [temp] => [field1] => [field2] => [field3] => [field4] => [field5] => [subfolders] => [pmfolders] => [buddylist] => [ignorelist] => [signature] => [searchprefs] => [rank] => [icontitle] => [iconpath] => [avatarpath] => [hascustomavatar] => 0 [avatardateline] => [avwidth] => [avheight] => [edit_userid] => [edit_username] => [edit_dateline] => [edit_reason] => [hashistory] => [pagetext_html] => [hasimages] => [signatureparsed] => [sighasimages] => [sigpic] => [sigpicdateline] => [sigpicwidth] => [sigpicheight] => [postcount] => 4 [islastshown] => [isfirstshown] => [attachments] => [allattachments] => ) --> The backed up partitions are the same as existing partitions, should > I still create new partitions?[/ref] If the partition table is intact, you don't need to create a new one. However, lots of times people are restoring because a disk has failed or something similar [ref] > ? --> That means i can restore from tape only to a mounted partition, is > that right?[/ref] Yes, ufsrestore writes files just like any other program and doesn't write straight to the partition, so you need to mount a filesystem first. [ref] > also, I am not familiar with script, how can I run this script?[/ref] The commands I typed are just regular Bourne shell commands. They will work at the regular command line prompt just fine. You don't need to put them in a separate file or anything to execute them However, if you want to do a little more typing, instead of this: for i in 0 6 7 do newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s"$i" done you could just type this: newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s0 newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s6 newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s7 Sometimes it's easier to type out each command separately, because you don't have to re-type the whole loop if you make typo... In truth, I just wrote it as a "for" loop because this is easier to type. (But, I do often use simple "for" loops interactively at the command line...) [ref][ref] >>? --> I am restoring from a full backup (ufsdump), so as you said I dont[/ref] > > need to use restoresymtable, do I?[/ref] If you use "ufsrestore" with the "r" option, it will create a restoresymtable file in the root directory where it's restoring. If you aren't going to do an incremental restore, you don't need it and you can just remove it. But I point it out so you will know it's there and it won't be left around to waste disk space. Hope that helps. - Logan [allowsmilie] => 1 [showsignature] => 0 [ipaddress] => [iconid] => 0 [visible] => 1 [attach] => 0 [infraction] => 0 [reportthreadid] => 0 [isusenetpost] => 1 [msgid] => <2ypdb.148219$834.113241@twister.austin.rr.com> [ref] => <3f75edd7$1@news.sentex.net> <3f761e0f$1@news.sentex.net> [htmlstate] => on_nl2br [postusername] => Logan [ip] => lshaw-usenet@au [isdeleted] => 0 [usergroupid] => [membergroupids] => [displaygroupid] => [password] => [passworddate] => [email] => [styleid] => [parentemail] => [homepage] => [icq] => [aim] => [yahoo] => [msn] => [skype] => [showvbcode] => [showbirthday] => [usertitle] => [customtitle] => [joindate] => [daysprune] => [lastvisit] => [lastactivity] => [lastpost] => [lastpostid] => [posts] => [reputation] => [reputationlevelid] => [timezoneoffset] => [pmpopup] => [avatarid] => [avatarrevision] => [profilepicrevision] => [sigpicrevision] => [options] => [akvbghsfs_optionsfield] => [birthday] => [birthday_search] => [maxposts] => [startofweek] => [referrerid] => [languageid] => [emailstamp] => [threadedmode] => [autosubscribe] => [pmtotal] => [pmunread] => [salt] => [ipoints] => [infractions] => [warnings] => [infractiongroupids] => [infractiongroupid] => [adminoptions] => [profilevisits] => [friendcount] => [friendreqcount] => [vmunreadcount] => [vmmoderatedcount] => [socgroupinvitecount] => [socgroupreqcount] => [pcunreadcount] => [pcmoderatedcount] => [gmmoderatedcount] => [assetposthash] => [fbuserid] => [fbjoindate] => [fbname] => [logintype] => [fbaccesstoken] => [newrepcount] => [vbseo_likes_in] => [vbseo_likes_out] => [vbseo_likes_unread] => [temp] => [field1] => [field2] => [field3] => [field4] => [field5] => [subfolders] => [pmfolders] => [buddylist] => [ignorelist] => [signature] => [searchprefs] => [rank] => [icontitle] => [iconpath] => [avatarpath] => [hascustomavatar] => 0 [avatardateline] => [avwidth] => [avheight] => [edit_userid] => [edit_username] => [edit_dateline] => [edit_reason] => [hashistory] => [pagetext_html] => [hasimages] => [signatureparsed] => [sighasimages] => [sigpic] => [sigpicdateline] => [sigpicwidth] => [sigpicheight] => [postcount] => 5 [islastshown] => [isfirstshown] => [attachments] => [allattachments] => ) --> restore question - Sun Solaris

restore question - Sun Solaris

Hey all, I need to restore my complete system fro tape , I am using ufsdump and backup entire vfstab which should be all file systems into a tape, now I need to replace entire system from tape into original locations. my question is if I use : #ufsrestore -xvf /dev/rmt/o will that take care of every thing? should I umount all file systemes in advance if so what is the command to do that. Can I install a basic solaris with all default partition size and settings and then run the above ufsrestore command to restore all original partitions ...

  1. #1

    Default restore question

    Hey all,
    I need to restore my complete system fro tape , I am using ufsdump and
    backup entire vfstab which should be all file systems into a tape, now I
    need to replace entire system from tape into original locations.
    my question is if I use :
    #ufsrestore -xvf /dev/rmt/o
    will that take care of every thing?
    should I umount all file systemes in advance if so what is the command to do
    that.
    Can I install a basic solaris with all default partition size and settings
    and then run the above ufsrestore command to restore all original partitions
    and file systems and folders from tape?
    Thanks in advance


    Rob Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: restore question

    Rob wrote: 

    No, that will only restore a single filesystem. Each ufsrestore
    restores a single filesystem, and you need to run one for each
    filesystem to restore.

    You should use /dev/rmt/0n and not /dev/rmt/o. (Note two differences:
    "o" vs. "0", and the addition of the "n", which will avoid rewinding
    the tape, so that you are at the position of the following filesystem.)
     

    If you are restoring a complete system, you should not have any
    filesystems to unmount. You could restore over an existing system,
    but that is the hard way.
     

    I don't know whether you can. That depends on whether your filesystems
    would fit on those disk partitions. But certainly, even if you could,
    that is the hard way!

    Here is the easy way:

    (1) Boot from the Solaris CD-ROM. Use "boot -s cdrom", so that you
    don't start the installer and instead just get a prompt you can
    use to run some commands.

    (2) Use "format" to make sure you have the partition tables you need.
    In your case, your existing ones may be fine.

    (3) Run "newfs" on each partition to create a filesystem. For example,
    you slice 0 is root, 1 is swap, 6 is /usr, and 7 is /export/home,
    you might do something like this:

    for i in 0 6 7
    do
    newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s"$i"
    done

    Note that I didn't include slice 1; it's not a filesystem.

    (4) For every one of your filesystems, first mount it, then
    restore the data, then unmount it. To continue the above
    example:

    for i in 0 6 7
    do
    echo "restoring slice $i"
    mount -o logging /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s"$i" /mnt
    cd /mnt
    ufsrestore rf /dev/rmt/0n
    rm restoresymtable
    cd /
    umount /mnt
    done

    Note that this assumes the slices are on the tape in numerical
    order. Obviously, if this isn't the case, you need to do
    them in a different order. Also note that I've used "r"
    instead of "x" and option to "ufsrestore". This works better
    for restoring whole filesystems. Also, "-o logging" isn't
    really necessary, but it will speed the restore up (because
    restores change lots of filesystem metadata and logging helps
    with that.) Also, the "restoresymtable" file helps with
    incremental restores, so if you are not doing those, you can
    just remove it. (If you are, the whole procedure is more
    complicated.)

    At this point, you should have all your data back on your
    filesystems, and the only thing you need to do is to make
    the system bootable again.

    (5) Run installboot. You probably need to mount the root
    filesystem first, with "mount /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0 /mnt" or
    similar. The exact command varies. See the doentation
    in "man installboot" or at http://docs.sun.com/ .

    Hope that helps.

    - Logan

    Logan Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: restore question

    On Sat, 27 Sep 2003 16:06:46 -0400, "Rob" <com>
    wrote:

     

    Hi, first of all you'll need to recreate all of your filesystems as
    they were before the Dump (you can also create them bigger than
    before.... or at least you'll need them to be as bigger as the ufsdump
    is).
    Then you should boot in single user mode from cdrom, and then restore
    your 'system' filesystems (/, /var, /opt,/usr, etc....) to your
    harddisk.

    After that you can boot the system and restore remaining FileSystems.

    HIH,

    Jeremy Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: restore question

    Please see ?-->
    "Logan Shaw" <rr.com> wrote in message
    news:X2ndb.148182$austin.rr.com... 
    >
    > No, that will only restore a single filesystem. Each ufsrestore
    > restores a single filesystem, and you need to run one for each
    > filesystem to restore.
    >
    > You should use /dev/rmt/0n and not /dev/rmt/o. (Note two differences:
    > "o" vs. "0", and the addition of the "n", which will avoid rewinding
    > the tape, so that you are at the position of the following filesystem.)
    > [/ref]
    to do 
    >
    > If you are restoring a complete system, you should not have any
    > filesystems to unmount. You could restore over an existing system,
    > but that is the hard way.
    > [/ref]
    settings [/ref]
    partitions 
    >
    > I don't know whether you can. That depends on whether your filesystems
    > would fit on those disk partitions. But certainly, even if you could,
    > that is the hard way!
    >
    > Here is the easy way:
    >
    > (1) Boot from the Solaris CD-ROM. Use "boot -s cdrom", so that you
    > don't start the installer and instead just get a prompt you can
    > use to run some commands.
    >
    > (2) Use "format" to make sure you have the partition tables you need.
    > In your case, your existing ones may be fine.
    >
    > (3) Run "newfs" on each partition to create a filesystem. For example,
    > you slice 0 is root, 1 is swap, 6 is /usr, and 7 is /export/home,
    > you might do something like this:
    >
    > for i in 0 6 7
    > do
    > newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s"$i"
    > done
    >
    > Note that I didn't include slice 1; it's not a filesystem.
    >
    > (4) For every one of your filesystems, first mount it, then
    > restore the data, then unmount it. To continue the above
    > example:
    >
    > for i in 0 6 7
    > do
    > echo "restoring slice $i"
    > mount -o logging /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s"$i" /mnt
    > cd /mnt
    > ufsrestore rf /dev/rmt/0n
    > rm restoresymtable
    > cd /
    > umount /mnt
    > done
    >
    > Note that this assumes the slices are on the tape in numerical
    > order. Obviously, if this isn't the case, you need to do
    > them in a different order. Also note that I've used "r"
    > instead of "x" and option to "ufsrestore". This works better
    > for restoring whole filesystems. Also, "-o logging" isn't
    > really necessary, but it will speed the restore up (because
    > restores change lots of filesystem metadata and logging helps
    > with that.) Also, the "restoresymtable" file helps with
    > incremental restores, so if you are not doing those, you can
    > just remove it. (If you are, the whole procedure is more
    > complicated.)
    >
    > At this point, you should have all your data back on your
    > filesystems, and the only thing you need to do is to make
    > the system bootable again.
    >
    > (5) Run installboot. You probably need to mount the root
    > filesystem first, with "mount /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0 /mnt" or
    > similar. The exact command varies. See the doentation
    > in "man installboot" or at http://docs.sun.com/ .
    >
    > Hope that helps.
    >
    > - Logan
    > -----------[/ref]


    please see ? -->

    Here is the easy way: 
    ? --> The backed up partitions are the same as existing partitions, should
    I still create new partitions?
     
    ? --> That means i can restore from tape only to a mounted partition, is
    that right?
    also, I am not familiar with script, how can I run this script?
     
    need to use restoresymtable, do I?
     


    Rob Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: restore question

    Rob wrote: 

    If the partition table is intact, you don't need to create a new one.
    However, lots of times people are restoring because a disk has failed
    or something similar
     

    Yes, ufsrestore writes files just like any other program and doesn't
    write straight to the partition, so you need to mount a filesystem
    first.
     

    The commands I typed are just regular Bourne shell commands. They
    will work at the regular command line prompt just fine. You don't
    need to put them in a separate file or anything to execute them
    However, if you want to do a little more typing, instead of this:

    for i in 0 6 7
    do
    newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s"$i"
    done

    you could just type this:

    newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s0
    newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s6
    newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s7

    Sometimes it's easier to type out each command separately, because
    you don't have to re-type the whole loop if you make typo...

    In truth, I just wrote it as a "for" loop because this is easier
    to type. (But, I do often use simple "for" loops interactively
    at the command line...)
     
    >
    > need to use restoresymtable, do I?[/ref]

    If you use "ufsrestore" with the "r" option, it will create a
    restoresymtable file in the root directory where it's restoring.
    If you aren't going to do an incremental restore, you don't need
    it and you can just remove it. But I point it out so you will
    know it's there and it won't be left around to waste disk space.

    Hope that helps.

    - Logan

    Logan Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: restore question

    "Rob" <com> wrote in message news:<3f75edd7$sentex.net>... 

    I don't know the config of your system, but if the system disk needs
    to be restored then you will either need to boot from cd or if you
    used jumpstart to load the system before I would definately recommend
    reloading it using jumpstart. Did you only have 1 disk in the system?
    or did you have other disks that are still intact, just not
    accessable right now? If it's just the system disk with / /usr /var
    /etc /opt... you can reload it and then do a interactive restore =
    ufsrestore -i and just add then extract only the files you need ....
    hopefully you keep your data on a seperate disk....

    sharona
    sharona Guest

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