"Logan Shaw" wrote in message news:X2ndb.148182$austin.rr.com...[ref] > Rob wrote:[ref] > > I need to restore my complete system fro tape , I am using ufsdump and > > backup entire vfstab which should be all file systems into a tape, now I > > need to replace entire system from tape into original locations. > > my question is if I use : > > #ufsrestore -xvf /dev/rmt/o > > will that take care of every thing?[/ref] > > No, that will only restore a single filesystem. Each ufsrestore > restores a single filesystem, and you need to run one for each > filesystem to restore. > > You should use /dev/rmt/0n and not /dev/rmt/o. (Note two differences: > "o" vs. "0", and the addition of the "n", which will avoid rewinding > the tape, so that you are at the position of the following filesystem.) >[ref] > > should I umount all file systemes in advance if so what is the command[/ref][/ref] to do[ref][ref] > > that.[/ref] > > If you are restoring a complete system, you should not have any > filesystems to unmount. You could restore over an existing system, > but that is the hard way. >[ref] > > Can I install a basic solaris with all default partition size and[/ref][/ref] settings[ref][ref] > > and then run the above ufsrestore command to restore all original[/ref][/ref] partitions[ref][ref] > > and file systems and folders from tape?[/ref] > > I don't know whether you can. That depends on whether your filesystems > would fit on those disk partitions. But certainly, even if you could, > that is the hard way! > > Here is the easy way: > > (1) Boot from the Solaris CD-ROM. Use "boot -s cdrom", so that you > don't start the installer and instead just get a prompt you can > use to run some commands. > > (2) Use "format" to make sure you have the partition tables you need. > In your case, your existing ones may be fine. > > (3) Run "newfs" on each partition to create a filesystem. For example, > you slice 0 is root, 1 is swap, 6 is /usr, and 7 is /export/home, > you might do something like this: > > for i in 0 6 7 > do > newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s"$i" > done > > Note that I didn't include slice 1; it's not a filesystem. > > (4) For every one of your filesystems, first mount it, then > restore the data, then unmount it. To continue the above > example: > > for i in 0 6 7 > do > echo "restoring slice $i" > mount -o logging /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s"$i" /mnt > cd /mnt > ufsrestore rf /dev/rmt/0n > rm restoresymtable > cd / > umount /mnt > done > > Note that this assumes the slices are on the tape in numerical > order. Obviously, if this isn't the case, you need to do > them in a different order. Also note that I've used "r" > instead of "x" and option to "ufsrestore". This works better > for restoring whole filesystems. Also, "-o logging" isn't > really necessary, but it will speed the restore up (because > restores change lots of filesystem metadata and logging helps > with that.) Also, the "restoresymtable" file helps with > incremental restores, so if you are not doing those, you can > just remove it. (If you are, the whole procedure is more > complicated.) > > At this point, you should have all your data back on your > filesystems, and the only thing you need to do is to make > the system bootable again. > > (5) Run installboot. You probably need to mount the root > filesystem first, with "mount /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0 /mnt" or > similar. The exact command varies. See the documentation > in "man installboot" or at http://docs.sun.com/ . > > Hope that helps. > > - Logan > -----------[/ref] please see ? --> Here is the easy way:[ref] > > (1) Boot from the Solaris CD-ROM. Use "boot -s cdrom", so that you > don't start the installer and instead just get a prompt you can > use to run some commands. > > (2) Use "format" to make sure you have the partition tables you need. > In your case, your existing ones may be fine. > > (3) Run "newfs" on each partition to create a filesystem. For example, > you slice 0 is root, 1 is swap, 6 is /usr, and 7 is /export/home, > you might do something like this: >[/ref] ? --> The backed up partitions are the same as existing partitions, should I still create new partitions? [ref] > for i in 0 6 7 > do > newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s"$i" > done > > Note that I didn't include slice 1; it's not a filesystem. > > (4) For every one of your filesystems, first mount it, then > restore the data, then unmount it. To continue the above > example: >[/ref] ? --> That means i can restore from tape only to a mounted partition, is that right? also, I am not familiar with script, how can I run this script? [ref] > for i in 0 6 7 > do > echo "restoring slice $i" > mount -o logging /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s"$i" /mnt > cd /mnt > ufsrestore rf /dev/rmt/0n > rm restoresymtable > cd / > umount /mnt > done > ? --> I am restoring from a full backup (ufsdump), so as you said I dont[/ref] need to use restoresymtable, do I? [ref] > Note that this assumes the slices are on the tape in numerical > order. Obviously, if this isn't the case, you need to do > them in a different order. Also note that I've used "r" > instead of "x" and option to "ufsrestore". This works better > for restoring whole filesystems. Also, "-o logging" isn't > really necessary, but it will speed the restore up (because > restores change lots of filesystem metadata and logging helps > with that.) Also, the "restoresymtable" file helps with > incremental restores, so if you are not doing those, you can > just remove it. (If you are, the whole procedure is more > complicated.) > > At this point, you should have all your data back on your > filesystems, and the only thing you need to do is to make > the system bootable again. > > (5) Run installboot. You probably need to mount the root > filesystem first, with "mount /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0 /mnt" or > similar. The exact command varies. See the documentation > in "man installboot" or at http://docs.sun.com/ . >[/ref] [allowsmilie] => 1 [showsignature] => 0 [ipaddress] => [iconid] => 0 [visible] => 1 [attach] => 0 [infraction] => 0 [reportthreadid] => 0 [isusenetpost] => 1 [msgid] => <3f761e0f$1@news.sentex.net> [ref] => <3f75edd7$1@news.sentex.net> [htmlstate] => on_nl2br [postusername] => Rob [ip] => rshahamat@hotma [isdeleted] => 0 [usergroupid] => [membergroupids] => [displaygroupid] => [password] => [passworddate] => [email] => [styleid] => [parentemail] => [homepage] => [icq] => [aim] => [yahoo] => [msn] => [skype] => [showvbcode] => [showbirthday] => [usertitle] => [customtitle] => [joindate] => [daysprune] => [lastvisit] => [lastactivity] => [lastpost] => [lastpostid] => [posts] => [reputation] => [reputationlevelid] => [timezoneoffset] => [pmpopup] => [avatarid] => [avatarrevision] => [profilepicrevision] => [sigpicrevision] => [options] => [akvbghsfs_optionsfield] => [birthday] => [birthday_search] => [maxposts] => [startofweek] => [referrerid] => [languageid] => [emailstamp] => [threadedmode] => [autosubscribe] => [pmtotal] => [pmunread] => [salt] => [ipoints] => [infractions] => [warnings] => [infractiongroupids] => [infractiongroupid] => [adminoptions] => [profilevisits] => [friendcount] => [friendreqcount] => [vmunreadcount] => [vmmoderatedcount] => [socgroupinvitecount] => [socgroupreqcount] => [pcunreadcount] => [pcmoderatedcount] => [gmmoderatedcount] => [assetposthash] => [fbuserid] => [fbjoindate] => [fbname] => [logintype] => [fbaccesstoken] => [newrepcount] => [vbseo_likes_in] => [vbseo_likes_out] => [vbseo_likes_unread] => [temp] => [field1] => [field2] => [field3] => [field4] => [field5] => [subfolders] => [pmfolders] => [buddylist] => [ignorelist] => [signature] => [searchprefs] => [rank] => [icontitle] => [iconpath] => [avatarpath] => [hascustomavatar] => 0 [avatardateline] => [edit_userid] => [edit_username] => [edit_dateline] => [edit_reason] => [hashistory] => [pagetext_html] => [hasimages] => [signatureparsed] => [sighasimages] => [sigpic] => [sigpicdateline] => [sigpicwidth] => [sigpicheight] => [postcount] => 3 [attachments] => [allattachments] => ) --> The backed up partitions are the same as existing partitions, should > I still create new partitions?[/ref] If the partition table is intact, you don't need to create a new one. However, lots of times people are restoring because a disk has failed or something similar [ref] > ? --> That means i can restore from tape only to a mounted partition, is > that right?[/ref] Yes, ufsrestore writes files just like any other program and doesn't write straight to the partition, so you need to mount a filesystem first. [ref] > also, I am not familiar with script, how can I run this script?[/ref] The commands I typed are just regular Bourne shell commands. They will work at the regular command line prompt just fine. You don't need to put them in a separate file or anything to execute them However, if you want to do a little more typing, instead of this: for i in 0 6 7 do newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s"$i" done you could just type this: newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s0 newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s6 newfs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s7 Sometimes it's easier to type out each command separately, because you don't have to re-type the whole loop if you make typo... In truth, I just wrote it as a "for" loop because this is easier to type. (But, I do often use simple "for" loops interactively at the command line...) [ref][ref] >>? --> I am restoring from a full backup (ufsdump), so as you said I dont[/ref] > > need to use restoresymtable, do I?[/ref] If you use "ufsrestore" with the "r" option, it will create a restoresymtable file in the root directory where it's restoring. If you aren't going to do an incremental restore, you don't need it and you can just remove it. But I point it out so you will know it's there and it won't be left around to waste disk space. Hope that helps. - Logan [allowsmilie] => 1 [showsignature] => 0 [ipaddress] => [iconid] => 0 [visible] => 1 [attach] => 0 [infraction] => 0 [reportthreadid] => 0 [isusenetpost] => 1 [msgid] => <2ypdb.148219$834.113241@twister.austin.rr.com> [ref] => <3f75edd7$1@news.sentex.net> <3f761e0f$1@news.sentex.net> [htmlstate] => on_nl2br [postusername] => Logan [ip] => lshaw-usenet@au [isdeleted] => 0 [usergroupid] => [membergroupids] => [displaygroupid] => [password] => [passworddate] => [email] => [styleid] => [parentemail] => [homepage] => [icq] => [aim] => [yahoo] => [msn] => [skype] => [showvbcode] => [showbirthday] => [usertitle] => [customtitle] => [joindate] => [daysprune] => [lastvisit] => [lastactivity] => [lastpost] => [lastpostid] => [posts] => [reputation] => [reputationlevelid] => [timezoneoffset] => [pmpopup] => [avatarid] => [avatarrevision] => [profilepicrevision] => [sigpicrevision] => [options] => [akvbghsfs_optionsfield] => [birthday] => [birthday_search] => [maxposts] => [startofweek] => [referrerid] => [languageid] => [emailstamp] => [threadedmode] => [autosubscribe] => [pmtotal] => [pmunread] => [salt] => [ipoints] => [infractions] => [warnings] => [infractiongroupids] => [infractiongroupid] => [adminoptions] => [profilevisits] => [friendcount] => [friendreqcount] => [vmunreadcount] => [vmmoderatedcount] => [socgroupinvitecount] => [socgroupreqcount] => [pcunreadcount] => [pcmoderatedcount] => [gmmoderatedcount] => [assetposthash] => [fbuserid] => [fbjoindate] => [fbname] => [logintype] => [fbaccesstoken] => [newrepcount] => [vbseo_likes_in] => [vbseo_likes_out] => [vbseo_likes_unread] => [temp] => [field1] => [field2] => [field3] => [field4] => [field5] => [subfolders] => [pmfolders] => [buddylist] => [ignorelist] => [signature] => [searchprefs] => [rank] => [icontitle] => [iconpath] => [avatarpath] => [hascustomavatar] => 0 [avatardateline] => [edit_userid] => [edit_username] => [edit_dateline] => [edit_reason] => [hashistory] => [pagetext_html] => [hasimages] => [signatureparsed] => [sighasimages] => [sigpic] => [sigpicdateline] => [sigpicwidth] => [sigpicheight] => [postcount] => 4 [attachments] => [allattachments] => ) -->