In article <bd6ttc$jhl$1mamenchi.zrz.TU-Berlin.DE>, Anno Siegel
<anno4000lublin.zrz.tu-berlin.de> wrote:
> Tim Lance <REMOVEtlanceaustin.rr.com> wrote in comp.sys.mac.system:
> > In article <220620032013028767%NotAbitOFspam*tlanceaustin.rr .com>, Tim
> > Lance <NotAbitOFspam*tlanceaustin.rr.com> wrote:
> >
> > > In article <QlrJa.262800$ro6.6775668news2.calgary.shaw.ca> , Steven
> > > Fisher <sdfisherspamcop.net> wrote:
> > >
> > > > Tim Lance wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Woulda sworn I'd tried that but that was a long time ago. When I wrote
> > > > > the original post I had just rebooted and did my usual, using logout,
> > > > > when I remembered I had once wondered about the verbose thing.
> > > > >
> > > > > Thanks for replying. Will give it a whirl.
> > > >
> > > > Post a follow-up with the results, please. I don't restart my Mac often
> > > > enough to try it myself. ;)
> > > >
> > > Know the feeling! WIll report when it is necessary to do so. Look for a
> > > similar subject line.
> > >
> > > Tim
> > >
> > > --
> > Nope. Typing exit does exactly what logout does. In fact after entering
> > exit the system responds with "logout." There is some more line by line
> > stuff but it is not true verbose mode stuff. It just gets you to the
> > GUI and all the Welcome items booting, but in the GUI. This ain't no
> > biggie-just curious as surely there's something to type.
>
> The point where you get to say "fsck -y" (or any other unix command) is
> just an interpolated shell run during the normal startup process. Once
> you exit the shell (whether via "logout", "exit" or other means) the
> startup process continues in whatever mode it was in before. Nothing
> you can do inside the shell can alter that. So, if the startup isn't
> verbose to begin with, you can't make it verbose after the fact.
>
> Anno
And *that* is what I was afraid of.

Oh, well. Thank goodness this ain't no biggie.

And thanks for replying.

Tim

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