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Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits - Adobe Photoshop 7, CS, CS2 & CS3

I have several candid shots which will make excellent portraits if I can deal with shiny areas on the lady’s faces. Does anyone have any Idea how I can “powder” those areas so as not to upset the subjects when they see the pictures. Bob Goldberg...

  1. #1

    Default Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    I have several candid shots which will make excellent portraits if I can deal with shiny areas on the lady’s faces. Does anyone have any Idea how I can “powder” those areas so as not to upset the subjects when they see the pictures.

    Bob Goldberg
    Howard Goldberg Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    It depends. I usually start with the clone tool, then the healing brush - sometimes I start with the patch tool. One would have to see it to say for sure, the best strategy.

    You might post this at:
    <http://www.retouchpro.com>

    They run contests and stuff, and there's a lot of good advice there.
    YrbkMgr Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    I usually start with the clone tool And I start with a Soft Box.
    Norbert Bissinger Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    You refer to the problem as areas rather than spots, to I am going to assume that they are fairly large. I have had success with isolating the areas with the lasso and applying as much feathering,layer adjustment using curves,levels,color balance, hue saturation and opacity variations to achieve smooth blending with the rest of the desired field. You can then finish off with the heal and clone. Hope this helps.
    Paul Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    I've found the healing brush to be excellent in these situations.
    JasonSmith Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    Jason

    The healing brush is a wonderful tool. However, I am speaking in terms of large areas like a whole forehead or an entire side of a face that is washed out to one extent or the other by bad placement of the subject or artificial lighting. I work on a lot of material that is purchased from professional studios that are run by less than professional employees. (High school teenagers) If anyone is capable of achieving desired results over large areas such as I am describing with the heal or clone tool without leaving noticable tracks, I would love to listen and learn.
    Paul Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    Thanks for the tips. I'll try them and see if they do the trick.

    Howard Goldberg
    Howard Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    "If anyone is capable of achieving desired results over large areas such as I am describing with the heal or clone tool without leaving noticable tracks"

    Brush opacity or blending settings can help. Also try one of the 'spatter' brushes, set to around 30-40 opacity - can help break up the patterned look that the clone tool makes.

    When you're dealing with this type of retouching, you cant be a one trick pony. One tool isnt neccesarily going to be the full solution. BUT - one tool can get you 80% of the way there.

    And yes, I have had great success (using the Healing Brush) with entire forehead areas.
    JasonSmith Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    The technique I use, after enlarging the area, is to select the best adjacent unshiny color with the eyedropper tool, then use a diffused airbrush to recolor the shiny part -- just like a woman applying blusher makeup.

    If necessary, blend gently with the blurring tool.

    Larry
    org
    Larry Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    Does anyone use the Dodge or Burn tools?
    Cheesefood Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    Cheesefood,
    I find dodge to be invaluable in just slighly diminishing the dark area that defines a wrinkle, making it less noticeable but still there.
    Enrique Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Shiny areas on lady's faces in portraits

    I use the dodge and burn only as a last resort in that kind of siuation, I
    find that sometimes their effect can be overdramatic. Still they work
    beautifully on scanned objects, especially statues, ceramics etc.


    Paul Guest

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