Professional Web Applications Themes

silhouetting - Photography

I saw a photo of a newly wedded couple silhouetted against a sunsetted sky. To get that effect, in that situation, do I meter for the sky? Will that be enough? Thanks, Patrick...

  1. #1

    Default silhouetting

    I saw a photo of a newly wedded couple silhouetted against a sunsetted sky.

    To get that effect, in that situation, do I meter for the sky? Will that be
    enough?


    Thanks,


    Patrick


    Patrick L. Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: silhouetting

    "Patrick L." <niceworkifyoucangetit.com> wrote...
    > I saw a photo of a newly wedded couple silhouetted against a sunsetted
    sky.
    >
    > To get that effect, in that situation, do I meter for the sky? Will that
    be
    > enough?
    Without seeing the same picture, how could we tell? If the
    silhouettes were dark, then, yes, you meter for the sky, add
    perhaps a stop or two (to keep the sky lighter than average
    grey) and don't use fill-flash.

    Victor


    Victor Bazarov Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: silhouetting

    Should do the trick. By metering on the sky you are going to make it come
    out the colour equivalent of mid-grey, and the people, who would need at
    least two more stops to show detail should come out close to black. If this
    is an occasion (like a wedding) bracket, to make sure you get the sky the
    way you want it.

    --
    [url]http://www.chapelhillnoir.com[/url]
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    [url]http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html[/url]
    New email - Contact on the Menyou page.
    "Patrick L." <niceworkifyoucangetit.com> wrote in message
    news:LDzRa.6799$Mc.556838newsread1.prod.itd.earth link.net...
    > I saw a photo of a newly wedded couple silhouetted against a sunsetted
    sky.
    >
    > To get that effect, in that situation, do I meter for the sky? Will that
    be
    > enough?
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    >
    > Patrick
    >
    >

    Tony Spadaro Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: silhouetting


    "Victor Bazarov" <v.AbazarovattAbi.com> wrote in message
    news:vhdial9q5hnla5corp.supernews.com...
    > "Patrick L." <niceworkifyoucangetit.com> wrote...
    > > I saw a photo of a newly wedded couple silhouetted against a sunsetted
    > sky.
    > >
    > > To get that effect, in that situation, do I meter for the sky? Will
    that
    > be
    > > enough?
    >
    > Without seeing the same picture, how could we tell? If the
    > silhouettes were dark, then, yes, you meter for the sky, add
    > perhaps a stop or two (to keep the sky lighter than average
    > grey) and don't use fill-flash.
    >
    Only add a stop or two if the sky is brighter than average gray, otherwise
    you will a) make the sky unnaturally bright, and b) quite likely reveal some
    detail in your subjects instead of achieving a true silhouette. Part of the
    problem with this type of shot is the horizon. Typically it will be all
    dark below the horizon, too. Therefore, you need to compose around the
    subjects above the horizon, with perhaps a thin strip of horizon along the
    bottom of the frame. Another thing to try is expose for the sky and then
    add fill flash to light up your subjects evenly with the horizon. Some of
    each, if possible.
    mc


    Matt Clara Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: silhouetting

    > If the
    > silhouettes were dark, then, yes, you meter for the sky, add
    > perhaps a stop or two (to keep the sky lighter than average
    > grey) and don't use fill-flash.

    That's the ticket. I would also add: meter for the sky, use bracketing
    in +/-.7 or +/- 1.0 increments. Just to be sure.
    Igor Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: silhouetting


    Mark M <net> wrote in message
    news:kBLRa.9192$.. 
    > sky. [/ref]
    that 
    >
    > While metering on the bright sky will darken the couple, it may also give
    > you a drab grey (really, a middle-toned) sky. Assuming the sky is fairly
    > bright, you might add a stop, but this is iffy and will vary depending on
    > how dark/bright the sky is.
    >
    > So... Bracket away--Unless, of course, you 've moved to digital. :)
    > When/if you do, there will be no more guessing in a static situation like
    > this one.[/ref]


    I have a digital, an E-10, and though I can tell, fairly reasonably,
    whether the exposure is right via the LCD monitor, I have found that I can
    be deceived by it. Shots that looked unacceptable have turned out fine (and
    vice versa) when printed or uploaded to my computer. If I am way out of the
    ballpark of acceptability, the monitor is reliable there. PhotoShop's
    burn tool might make up the difference.

    Patrick L.


    Oscar Guest

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139