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Software Router for OS X ? - Mac Networking

Is there a software router for OS X? I've done a web search, but all I found was geeRoute, and it doesn't do what I need. Stefan...

  1. #1

    Default Software Router for OS X ?

    Is there a software router for OS X? I've done a web search, but all I
    found was geeRoute, and it doesn't do what I need.

    Stefan

    Stefan Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Software Router for OS X ?

    In article <_INVALID_.ch>,
    Stefan <_INVALID_.ch> wrote:
     

    Jaguar has one built in: System Preferences -> Sharing -> Internet.
    Wayne Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Software Router for OS X ?



    Wayne C. Morris wrote:
     [/ref]
     

    This is not what I'm looking for. I need a progam that makes the Mac a
    router for two (better three) networks with manually configurable
    addresses and behaviour. (In my particular case the mac should be a DHCP
    client at one network and have a manually configured address on the other.)

    Stefan

    Stefan Guest

  4. Moderated Post

    Default Re: Software Router for OS X ?

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    Dan Guest
    Moderated Post

  5. #5

    Default Re: Software Router for OS X ?

    In article <3f96e00f$swissonline.ch>,
    Stefan <_INVALID_.ch> wrote: 
    >
    > This is not what I'm looking for. I need a progam that makes the Mac a
    > router for two (better three) networks with manually configurable
    > addresses and behaviour. (In my particular case the mac should be a DHCP
    > client at one network and have a manually configured address on the other.)
    >[/ref]

    Someone just told me on the darwinos-users list to use that internet
    sharing thing, ugghh.

    I've got 2 NICs, with a network on each. One network is a subnet of the
    other, the Mac is to be firewall/router. At present there is one
    firewall rule in operation: 65335 pass all from any to any.

    The clients on the larger net can also access the "world" thru a
    corporate firewall. Clients on both nets can access AFP, web, & QTSS
    running on the firewall/router machine, but there is no path thru
    between the 2 nets. If I manually start routed, the machine shuts down
    all connection via en0, the larger net.

    If I take a client from the smaller net (on en1), and configure its
    netmask and default gateway for the larger net (on en0), but leave its
    valid IP the same, it can access the world thru the corporate firewall,
    but my firewall/router thinks it should be connected via en1 and refuses
    connection...

    I find it ominous that the OS-X Server Admin Guide has very little to
    say about this. Should be a fundamental thing for a server ...
    Peter Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Software Router for OS X ?

    In article <_INVALID_.ch>,
    Stefan <_INVALID_.ch> wrote:
     

    Vicomsoft's Intergate may be worth taking a look at:

    http://www.vicomsoft.com/download/download.main.html

    You can download a fully functional and unlimited version of the
    software to try out for 30 days.

    It has a lot of features and appears to be very stable. We have recently
    replaced IPNetRouter with InterGate. We liked IPNetRouter, but have
    waited far too long for an OS X version.

    Regards

    --
    Martin

    "Disregard then, reader, my title and my character,
    and attend only to my arguments." P. J. Proudhon.
    Martin Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Software Router for OS X ?

    In article <3f96e00f$swissonline.ch>,
    Stefan <_INVALID_.ch> wrote:
     
    >
    >This is not what I'm looking for. I need a progam that makes the Mac a
    >router for two (better three) networks with manually configurable
    >addresses and behaviour. (In my particular case the mac should be a DHCP
    >client at one network and have a manually configured address on the other.)[/ref]

    Erm ... yes, it does that. Set up your network access using
    the 'Network' System preferences panel, then do what Wayne said.


    Simon Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Software Router for OS X ?

    In comp.sys.mac.system Stefan <_invalid_.ch> wrote: [/ref]

    >
    > This is not what I'm looking for. I need a progam that makes the Mac a
    > router for two (better three) networks with manually configurable
    > addresses and behaviour. (In my particular case the mac should be a DHCP
    > client at one network and have a manually configured address on the other.)
    >
    > Stefan
    >[/ref]

    You can setup routing without any additional software as it is built in
    but, I don't believe that you want to use sharing unless you do want
    to use NAT. To setup a straight forward router without NAT do this:

    Install your additional Network Interface cards. I'm assuming that
    you should be able to configure there IP addresses as appropriate
    through System Preferences -> Network.

    Next Edit /etc/hostconfig and set FORWARDING=-YES-. This should
    cause net.inet.ip.forwarding to get set to a 1 following a reboot.
    Check it by doing this:

    # sysctl -a|grep net.inet.ip.forwarding
    net.inet.ip.forwarding: 1

    Now the system will be able to route between network interfaces and
    there will be no natd daemon running. The machine should be a
    straightforward router. You may wish to run /sbin/routed on the
    machine so that it may advertise its routing table on the network
    interfaces using the RIP protocol.

    regards
    --
    John J. Rushford
    j j r { a t } a l i s a { d o t } o r g
    http://www.cs.du.edu/~jjr
    read-the-signature@send-spam-to-dev-null.com Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Software Router - Summary

    This is an overview of what I've found so far. I didn't test the
    solutions yet, so I can't comment.

    - You can't just add a second address to the same NIC. Don't know about
    the situation with two NICs.

    - The "sharing" control panel may work, but it doesn't offer a front end
    to configure anything, so the Mac's local IP address stays hidden. I
    believe it's 192.168.0.1. I'm not sure whether it's a true
    two-way-router, as I've not been able to print with TCP to my laser writer.

    - Sustainable Softworks offers a small program called IPNetShareX,
    which, as I understand, adds basically a front end to the "sharing"
    panel of the Mac. So this may be a solution for low-end needs.

    - OS X: The underlying Unix does indeed include one (ore several?)
    router programs. You need the Unix command line to access and activate
    one of those routers. I didn't test it, but this may offer a free solution.

    - Sustainable Softworks used to sell IPNetRouter, which was a wonderful
    router for Macs running OS 7.1 through 9.x. But it hasn't been updated
    for OSX yet. Maybe it never will, because that program was't a router by
    itself, but basically just a front end to access the built-in functions
    of OpenTransport. This made the router extremly slick and fast, but
    excludes a simple update to OSX.

    - Vicom offers a product called InterGate. Vicom was the main competitor
    to Sustainable in the OS 9 aera, but other than the latter, they managed
    to upgrade to OS X. I had difficulties with the trial program as it
    somehow prevented the Mac to get it's "main" internet address by DHCP
    from the prvider. But maybe it's just me, I keep working on it.

    Stefan

    Stefan Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Software Router for OS X ?

    In article <Wjmmb.9704$275.20476attbi_s53>, (jjr) wrote: 
    .... 

    I've scoured the BSD sites, MacOS-Server archives, Googled all-over.
    The answers seem to fall into three groups:
    1. It just works (with little or no explanation :-(
    2. Use NAT
    3. (& this one's a little scary) It works if the "sub"net is 198.162.x.y

    The Server OS does some checks at boot time to make sure the IP nrs and
    hostnames for all its inet ports are registered with upstream DNS. If
    not it won't serve, so that must all be 100%, and mine is (AFAICT).

    The Server OS has a few other little hidey places for config details,
    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107637
    has a script with all the details.

    I have
    [qtss:~] peterk% sysctl -a | grep -i forward
    net.inet.ip.forwarding: 1
    net.inet.ip.fastforwarding: 0
    net.inet6.ip6.forwarding: 0

    [qtss:~] peterk% sudo ipfw list
    Password:
    65535 allow ip from any to any

    [qtss:~] peterk% netstat -nr
    Routing tables

    Internet:
    Destination Gateway Flags Refs Use Netif
    Expire
    default 130.216.239.254 UGSc 4 6 en0
    127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 UH 16 3606 lo0
    130.216.1.1 130.216.239.254 UGHW 3 13 en0
    130.216.224/20 link#5 UCS 4 0 en0
    130.216.231.1 127.0.0.1 UHS 0 0 lo0
    130.216.231.2 127.0.0.1 UHS 0 0 lo0
    130.216.231.80/28 link#4 UCS 0 0 en1
    130.216.231.94 127.0.0.1 UHS 0 0 lo0
    130.216.239.254 0:a:42:41:2f:fc UHLW 4 0 en0
    1198
    169.254 link#5 UCS 0 0 en0
    224.0.0.251 130.216.239.254 UGHW 3 89 en0
    239.255.255.253 130.216.239.254 UGHW3 0 13 en0
    3587

    3rd line 130.216.1.1 is main site DNS
    4th line 130.216.224/20 is faculty vlan, or "world" for my router
    line 5 is the IP nr of my server/router
    line 6 is an alias for a web server hosted on the same box
    line 7 is the subnet I wish to firewall and route
    line 8 is the registered IP for the 2nd NIC, router for the subnet

    Some solutions say I must add a route from my subnet to the port
    facing the world. If I

    [qtss:~] peterk% sudo route delete -net 130.216.231.80/28
    [qtss:~] peterk% sudo route add -net 130.216.231.80/28 gateway \
    130.216.231.1
    add net 130.216.231.80: gateway gateway
    [qtss:~] peterk% netstat -nr
    ......
    130.216.231&0x82d8e701 130.216.191.83 UGSc 0 0 en0

    ??!!

    I also observe a wide disparity in recommendations of what value should
    be entered for the gateway for the 2nd NIC:
    leave it blank and the system uses the local default;
    use 0.0.0.0 (which is s'posed to have the same effect);
    use its own IP nr (since it is the router for the subnet);
    use the IP nr of the port facing the world;
    use the IP of the world gateway;

    Since this is Server OS it pays to check and manually correct if needed,
    that the numbers are written to:
    /var/db/SystemConfiguration/preferences.xml
    /System/Library/ServerSetup/Configured/null_POR.plist
    /System/Library/ServerSetup/UnConfigured/POA.plist

    still no cigar...
    Clients on the subnet can access everything on the server,
    clients from the world can access everything on the server,
    there's no route thru :-(

    The fact that routed shuts down the world interface makes me
    think I've still got something wrong.
    Peter Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Software Router for OS X ?

    Stefan,

    See http://www.macorchard.com/

    Drew

    In article <_INVALID_.ch>,
    Stefan <_INVALID_.ch> wrote:
     

    --
    __________________________________________________ _________________
    The Mac Orchard - http://www.macorchard.com/
    Essential Internet Applications since 1995
    Drew Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Software Router for OS X ?

    "Drew D. Saur" <com> writes:
     [/ref]

    If the OP is feeling adventurous he can try out Zebra which does RIP,
    OSPF, BGP, etc.

    http://www.zebra.org/

    There's also been a fork off Zebra called Quagga:

    http://www.quagga.net/

    --
    David Magda <dmagda at ee.ryerson.ca>, http://www.magda.ca/
    Because the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under
    the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may do well
    under the new. -- Niccolo Machiavelli, _The Prince_, Chapter VI
    David Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Software Router - Summary

    In article <swissonline.ch>,
    Stefan <_INVALID_.ch> wrote: 

    Systewm Preferences -> Network -> TCP/IP ->

    Show: Network Port Configurations -> Duplicate

    This will do all the necessaries for
    /var/db/SystemConfiguration/preferences.xml

    but it is usually Not a Good Idea to use 2 IP nrs on the same port if
    they are not in the same subnet.
     

    In the Terminal type ifconfig or netstat -nr
    you'll see lots of info about your network connectivity.
     

    routed is the basic BSD router, and it runs on OS-X, but I suspect from
    its behaviour that some CoreFoundation parts of OS-X have overtaken it
    without properly replacing it. See the tab: Configuration Agents at:

    http://developer.apple.com/doentation/Networking/Conceptual/SysConfigO
    verview926/index.html

    Also the oblique reference to the demise/obfuscation of BSD routing at:

    http://developer.apple.com/doentation/CoreFoundation/Conceptual/CFPort
    sAndSockets/index.html
     

    Yeah, why use the Open Source BSD/Linux methods when you can pay good
    money for a 3rd party solution? ;-)
    Peter Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Software Router - Summary

    In article <auckland.ac.nz>,
    Peter KERR <domain> wrote: 
    >
    >routed is the basic BSD router, and it runs on OS-X, but I suspect from
    >its behaviour that some CoreFoundation parts of OS-X have overtaken it
    >without properly replacing it. See the tab: Configuration Agents at:
    >
    >http://developer.apple.com/doentation/Networking/Conceptual/SysConfigO
    >verview926/index.html[/ref]

    As far as I can tell, the configuration stuff merely manipulates the
    BSD stuff; it does not replace or "overtake" it.
     

    "This topic is under construction". Anyway, the stuff it describes is
    built on top of sockets, it doesn't obfuscate or obselete BSD sockets
    or routing.

    --
    Matthew T. Russotto net
    "Extremism in defense of liberty is no vice, and moderation in pursuit
    of justice is no virtue." But extreme restriction of liberty in pursuit of
    a modi of security is a very expensive vice.
    Matthew Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: Software Router - Summary

    In article <net>,
    speakeasy.net (Matthew Russotto) wrote: 
    >
    > "This topic is under construction". Anyway, the stuff it describes is
    > built on top of sockets, it doesn't obfuscate or obselete BSD sockets
    > or routing.
    >[/ref]

    So what does the paragraph above that mean:

    Core Foundation defines several opaque types that correspond
    to Mach ports, message ports, and BSD sockets. These objects
    allow your application to communicate between multiple threads,
    with other processes, and other computers over a network.

    What are these "opaque types that correspond"? Opaque, in that you
    cannot see the BSD sockets thru them? Correspond to... meaning a bit
    like but not the same? Or is that "correspond" as in writing a letter?

    I remember hearing back about 10.0.x that NetInfo would replace all the
    BSD flat files. Where are we now? It is much easier for the user to
    choose flat files or NetInfo.

    Sorry, I'm getting niggly. I'm prob'ly missing some vital clue that's
    tucked away in a man page that has nothing to do with routing...
    Peter Guest

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