We have a red hat 9.0 on 2 CD's (included with a book). We boot from the first, then a point insert the second. After that is ok; we just have some backup files to copy back into places. On the same system (dual boot) the Windows installation consisted in : Windows-----> 1 Windows XP CD 2 ATI driver CD 3 Intel express installer CD 4 MS Office 5 Logitech ITouch 6 CD AVG, Acrobat, 7 Power DVD, 8 Nero burner 9 Dictionnary 10 Installation CD for Palm pilot 11 Installation CD for Cannon A 70 camera 12 CD for learing spanish... The biggest pain is CD 1, which reboots one or two times, I don't remember exactly, and most of all, CD 3 which reboots 4 or five times at least and leaves you with a message such as "The diver for this sound card is material not approved by Microsoft, are you sure you want to install this driver?" I would say that installation for Windows is quite more complicated. However, on the other hand, installing a *new* program or device seems somewhat easier than on Linux. But then, this is quite personal matter, finally. Take care, Gaetan [allowsmilie] => 1 [showsignature] => 0 [ipaddress] => [iconid] => 0 [visible] => 1 [attach] => 0 [infraction] => 0 [reportthreadid] => 0 [isusenetpost] => 1 [msgid] => [ref] => <2wjLb.2904$fM3.14577@news20.bellglobal.com> [htmlstate] => on_nl2br [postusername] => Gaétan [ip] => gmarti@mediomPA [isdeleted] => 0 [usergroupid] => [membergroupids] => [displaygroupid] => [password] => [passworddate] => [email] => [styleid] => [parentemail] => [homepage] => [icq] => [aim] => [yahoo] => [msn] => [skype] => [showvbcode] => [showbirthday] => [usertitle] => [customtitle] => [joindate] => [daysprune] => [lastvisit] => [lastactivity] => [lastpost] => [lastpostid] => [posts] => [reputation] => [reputationlevelid] => [timezoneoffset] => [pmpopup] => [avatarid] => [avatarrevision] => [profilepicrevision] => [sigpicrevision] => [options] => [akvbghsfs_optionsfield] => [birthday] => [birthday_search] => [maxposts] => [startofweek] => [referrerid] => [languageid] => [emailstamp] => [threadedmode] => [autosubscribe] => [pmtotal] => [pmunread] => [salt] => [ipoints] => [infractions] => [warnings] => [infractiongroupids] => [infractiongroupid] => [adminoptions] => [profilevisits] => [friendcount] => [friendreqcount] => [vmunreadcount] => [vmmoderatedcount] => [socgroupinvitecount] => [socgroupreqcount] => [pcunreadcount] => [pcmoderatedcount] => [gmmoderatedcount] => [assetposthash] => [fbuserid] => [fbjoindate] => [fbname] => [logintype] => [fbaccesstoken] => [newrepcount] => [vbseo_likes_in] => [vbseo_likes_out] => [vbseo_likes_unread] => [temp] => [field1] => [field2] => [field3] => [field4] => [field5] => [subfolders] => [pmfolders] => [buddylist] => [ignorelist] => [signature] => [searchprefs] => [rank] => [icontitle] => [iconpath] => [avatarpath] => [hascustomavatar] => 0 [avatardateline] => [avwidth] => [avheight] => [edit_userid] => [edit_username] => [edit_dateline] => [edit_reason] => [hashistory] => [pagetext_html] => [hasimages] => [signatureparsed] => [sighasimages] => [sigpic] => [sigpicdateline] => [sigpicwidth] => [sigpicheight] => [postcount] => 14 [islastshown] => [isfirstshown] => [attachments] => [allattachments] => ) --> Some Newbie Questions - Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration

Some Newbie Questions - Linux Setup, Configuration & Administration

I am thinking of giving Linux a try, and have a few questions, which I hope the experts here will answer. I'm looking for a version of linux that is easy to install. If it could be as easy as windows 98 to install, that would be ideal, but I'm willing to do a little work if I have to. Standard office apps are available for linux, if I have it right, and so are email clients and browsers, but I'm wondering how difficult it will be getting linux to recognize my network card. Will there be any problem with ...

  1. #1

    Default Some Newbie Questions

    I am thinking of giving Linux a try, and have a few questions, which I hope
    the experts here will answer.

    I'm looking for a version of linux that is easy to install. If it could be
    as easy as windows 98 to install, that would be ideal, but I'm willing to
    do a little work if I have to.

    Standard office apps are available for linux, if I have it right, and so
    are email clients and browsers, but I'm wondering how difficult it will be
    getting linux to recognize my network card. Will there be any problem with
    the CD reader and the CD burner?

    Once the network card is working, can linux 'talk' to the other computers
    on our home lan? They are running windows, and are connected using a
    Linksys router.

    Any idea of the best way to acquire the OS - download or on CD?

    Thanks for any recommendations.


    starwars Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    starwars <homelinux.net> wrote in
    news:homelinux.net:
     

    RedHat 9 was very Windows-ish WRT installation.
     

    None.
     

    Yes. Use samba and it will appear to your other boxes like a Windows box
    with shared folders and printers.
     

    Download the 3 ISOs from RedHat and burn them. Then boot from ISO #1.

    --
    - Mark ->
    --
    Mark Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    On Thu, 8 Jan 2004 16:37:36 +0100 (CET), starwars wrote: 

    Mandrake or Suse. Here look at Mandrake
    http://doc.mandrakelinux.com/MandrakeLinux/91/en/Quick_Startup.html/
     

    You may want to read http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    We cannot see what equipment you have from here.
     

    Yes.
     

    Yes, with over 190 linuxs, you can buy it at the distro's site.
    You could check store's web pages for the one you pick.
    Realy depends on where you are.
     

    Frequently Asked Questions (faq) Search engine:

    http://groups.google.com/advanced_group_search
    buy cd in the first box
    *linux* in the Newsgroup, pick English
    Bit Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    In article <homelinux.net>,
    starwars wrote:

    Congratulations on a very sane OS choice. However, your questions are
    quite meaningless, and I think you should refine them a little.
     

    Speaking of Linux per se, get a fairly new version, 2.4 is good.

    If you mean the difference between distributions like Red Hat, Debian,
    Mandrake, etc., few distributions today are as hard to get working as
    Windows 98. You even get all the apps and drivers installed at the same
    time, as a bonus! :)
     

    No way to tell, since you don't give a clue about what sort of cards and
    CD drives you have! I have no problems, for what it's worth, which is not
    much. Check the hardware compatibility list of whatever distribution you
    end up choosing.
     

    Of course. Networking is the strong area of Linux.
     

    I don't know. Would you prefer downloading or do CDs feel more
    comfortable? Do you have a fast connection? Are you willing to buy a boxed
    set of a nice commercial distribution with CDs, manuals and tech support?

    --
    Juha Siltala
    http://www.edu.helsinki.fi/activity/people/jsiltala/
    Juha Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    On Thu, 8 Jan 2004 16:37:36 +0100 (CET), starwars
    <homelinux.net> wrote:
     

    Depending on the Linux "distribution" you get, installation can be anywhere from
    trivially easy to fiendishly hard. I've heard that the Knoppix installation is
    pretty friendly (Knoppix Linux /can/ run directly from the CDROM, meaning that
    you can evaluate it before you install it). Personally, I run Slackware Linux
    and have never found the installation all that difficult.
     

    No trouble at all. The operating system is fully capable of handling all but the
    most esoteric of network cards (you don't happen to have a S390 VNIC, do you?
    <grin>); any standard network card will be detectible, configurable, and usable
    under Linux. The same goes for CDROM and CDRW drives.
     

    Linux can 'talk' to your other computers using standard TCP/IP tools. If you are
    looking for "file and print sharing", then the Samba application for Linux
    provides that functionality. Samba is a standard part of most mainstream
    distributions, and (in distros like Knoppix or Mandrake, etc.) is easy to
    configure.
     

    Download if you got the time and capacity.

    - or -

    See if there's someone in your neighbourhood (or church, or place of work, or
    health club, or .. you get the picture) that already uses Linux, and see if they
    will lend you the install media. Chances are that not only will they lend it to
    you, they'll /give/ it to you, along with advice and assistance.

    - or -

    Buy a CD from a distributor: either go to the website of your distro of choice,
    and use their 'store', or go to a place like cheapbytes.com and buy it for
    peanuts.

    - or -

    Go to your local big-box bookstore, and see what they have in the way of
    software or books. A fair number of "Linux" books come with an install CD, and
    bookstores that carry software sometimes carry Linux distros. That's how I got
    into Slackware; the local big-box bookstore only carried Slackware for the
    longest time, and I purchased my first CD set from them before they started
    carrying other distributions.

     

    --
    Lew Pitcher
    IT Consultant, Enterprise Technology Solutions
    Toronto Dominion Bank Financial Group

    (Opinions expressed are my own, not my employers')
    Lew Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    In comp.os.linux.misc starwars <homelinux.net> wrote: 
     

    Present-day distributions are easy to install - I have used SuSE with
    good success, other people regularly report spectacularly good success
    with Knoppix.
     

    Chances are that your card is suported, and if it is supported,
    chances are that the installer will be able to get it to run. To make
    sure, search for your model on http://www.linuxhardware.net, or on your
    distributor's hardware compatibility list.

     

    No, not unless they're older than eight years or so.
     

    Yes, linux speaks more network protocols than you can shake a stick
    at. The obscure ones can be tedious to set up, sometimes.
     

    If you are computer-savvy to any degree, chances are that your time
    spent downloading and burning is worth more than the couple $ you pay
    for a boxed set. I'd say buy one and support the distributor. Many of
    them employ kernel hackers and other contributors, so you get to feel
    good about it, too.


    --
    No animal was harmed in the composition of this message.

    Kilian Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    On Thursday 08 Jan 2004 3:37 pm, starwars uttered these immortal words:
     

    SuSE or Mandrake in that case really. See http://www.distrowatch.com. TBH,
    having installed Win98SE recently, I've found most recent distros easier to
    install. YMMV of course and the choice is yours.
     

    Office suites include KOffice and OpenOffice.org.
    Mail clients include KMail, Evolution and Sylpheed.
    Browsers include Konqueror, Mozilla, Mozilla Firebird, Opera and Galeon.
     

    Depends which network card. Check for hardware compatibility at the website
    of the distro you choose or Google/Google Groups. Most recent CD writers
    work. Again, check a hardware compatibility list or Google/Google Groups.
     

    Linux impliments TCP/IP and so does Windows so they will be able to "talk"
    to each other. It just depends which protocol (language they talk in)
    you're going to use. My guess is you'll want file and print sharing so look
    at Samba.
     

    Which ever way you feel is best for you.

    --
    Andy.

    Andy Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions


    "starwars" <homelinux.net> wrote in message
    news:homelinux.net... 
    hope 

    For your first try at Linux...I'd say Mandrake would be a good place to
    start


    philo Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    On Thu, 08 Jan 2004 16:37:36 +0100, starwars wrote:
     
    I like Mandrake and am using vesion 9.2
    Try www.linuxemporium.co.uk for a download version.I expect you have
    similar suppliers in the US.

    I have a Linksys BEFSR41 router and a D-Link DSL-300G+ router and both
    work well, we have 3 comps. Mine and my sons (SUSe) both dual booting with
    windows and my wife with win XP only.

    --
    Neil
    Delete delete to get address

    Neil Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    On Thu, 08 Jan 2004 16:00:37 GMT, Bit Twister
    <localdomain> wrote:
     
    >
    >Mandrake or Suse. Here look at Mandrake
    >http://doc.mandrakelinux.com/MandrakeLinux/91/en/Quick_Startup.html/[/ref]

    Mandrake is my reccommendation for newbies at home, though here's a
    link to the main page (the link Bit Twister gave you is for the 9.1
    startup guide, which is still useful, but Mandrake is on 9.2 now).

    http://www.mandrakelinux.com/en-us/
     
    >
    >You may want to read http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    >We cannot see what equipment you have from here.[/ref]

    Mandrake has a database of hardware that has been tried with their
    software at http://www.mandrakelinux.com/en/hardware.php3

    The only CD-ROM I ever had a problem with was extremely old (early
    1990s)... I've never had a problem with a CD-RW.

    <snip> [/ref]

    That depends a lot on your needs and situation and patience. I
    usually download what I need because it's cheaper, but I have paid
    copies of Debian (ordered because at the time I had dialup), Mandrake
    9.2 (because I was impatient, didn't want to d/l it, and wanted the
    book that came with it).

    <snip>

    Any other questions? Just shoot.

    Susan
    illecebra Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    In message <homelinux.net>,
    starwars <homelinux.net> writes 
    See the other followups for most answers.

    Is the UK the only place where Linux distros come on magazine discs? In
    the last six months, I've collected SUSE, Mandrake, RedHat, Fedora,
    Gentoo, FreeBSD and OpenBSD, most of which I've installed and played
    with. I mostly use Debian Woody, which also came on a magazine, though
    it's quite rare to find Debian that way.

    Yes, I have ADSL, I could download complete ISOs, but it's still a
    nuisance at about ten hours per distro. With a DVD magazine
    subscription, I've also become aware of many apps I'd never have heard
    of otherwise. Even a few of the articles have been of some use.
    --
    Joe
    Joe Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    starwars wrote: 

    As easy as Windows 98? The easiest is what you know the best. If you do
    not know Linux at all, you will find some stuff difficult to understand,
    (huh? /dev/hda1?, huh? tar xvzf?) or at least, more difficult than
    Windows. If you are more interested than just giving linux a quick
    glance, you should or will shortly overcome these difficulties and, very
    honestly, may find that you made the very best decision about computing
    in your life. It is just plainly fantastic.

    Just for your info, my installation of windows involves 12 CD's and some
    6 or seven rebooting. My installation of Red Hat 9 only two and is much
    quicker.
     

    Gaétan Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    Gaétan Martineau <qc.ca> wrote in
    news:2wjLb.2904$bellglobal.com:
     

    More info: WinXP took 2 CD's including Office and RH9 took all 3 ISO for
    me.

    --
    - Mark ->
    --
    Mark Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    Mark A. Odell wrote: 
    >
    >
    > More info: WinXP took 2 CD's including Office and RH9 took all 3 ISO for
    > me.[/ref]

    More for me as well: Given a pc;

    Linux-------->
    We have a red hat 9.0 on 2 CD's (included with a book). We boot from
    the first, then a point insert the second. After that is ok; we just
    have some backup files to copy back into places.

    On the same system (dual boot) the Windows installation consisted in :

    Windows----->
    1 Windows XP CD
    2 ATI driver CD
    3 Intel express installer CD
    4 MS Office
    5 Logitech ITouch
    6 CD AVG, Acrobat,
    7 Power DVD,
    8 Nero burner
    9 Dictionnary
    10 Installation CD for Palm pilot
    11 Installation CD for Cannon A 70 camera
    12 CD for learing spanish...

    The biggest pain is CD 1, which reboots one or two times, I don't
    remember exactly, and most of all, CD 3 which reboots 4 or five times at
    least and leaves you with a message such as "The diver for this sound
    card is material not approved by Microsoft, are you sure you want to
    install this driver?"

    I would say that installation for Windows is quite more complicated.
    However, on the other hand, installing a *new* program or device seems
    somewhat easier than on Linux. But then, this is quite personal matter,
    finally.

    Take care,

    Gaetan

    Gaétan Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    In article <homelinux.net>,
    starwars <homelinux.net> wrote: 

    It would be difficult to find a version of Linux which was harder to
    install than Windows 98. The task of installing Windows has got easier
    since then but Windows 98 is a proper pig to install.
     

    It will almost certainly just work. It's hard to find a network card
    which doesn't have good Linux support these days.
     

    Again, most unlikely. Assuming they're normal IDE devices they will
    work fine.
     

    Yes, no problem. Assuming you want to use Windows file sharing you'll
    need Samba installed on the Linux box. As long as you're using TCP/IP
    on your Windows boxes they can talk to anything. (If they're using
    Microsoft's obsolete NetBeui instead then upgrade them to TCP/IP.)
     

    Probably easiest to buy a boxed set to start with.

    HTH
    John
    --
    Wallingford, Oxfordshire, England
    We had a woodhenge here once but it rotted.
    John Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    On Sat, 10 Jan 2004 08:28:22 +0000 (GMT), John Winters <org.uk> wrote: 
    >
    > It would be difficult to find a version of Linux which was harder to
    > install than Windows 98. The task of installing Windows has got easier
    > since then but Windows 98 is a proper pig to install.

    >
    > It will almost certainly just work. It's hard to find a network card
    > which doesn't have good Linux support these days.

    >
    > Again, most unlikely. Assuming they're normal IDE devices they will
    > work fine.

    >
    > Yes, no problem. Assuming you want to use Windows file sharing you'll
    > need Samba installed on the Linux box. As long as you're using TCP/IP
    > on your Windows boxes they can talk to anything. (If they're using
    > Microsoft's obsolete NetBeui instead then upgrade them to TCP/IP.)

    >
    > Probably easiest to buy a boxed set to start with.
    >
    > HTH
    > John[/ref]


    Second the motion.

    I've found the Debian install from the CDs to be a breeze on boxes old
    and new.

    When in doubt, just hit Enter during the install and the program will work
    it out.

    Debian installs in the textmode, taking care of the basics first, which is
    a very intelligent approach.

    AC

    Alan Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    In <homelinux.net>, on
    01/08/2004
    at 04:37 PM, starwars <homelinux.net> said:
     

    Any of the major distributions is easy to install.
     

    It's not as hard.
     

    Yes.
     

    Probably automatic, but what card is it?
     

    Most likely not, but what models do you have?
     

    Yes. You may need to do some configuration.
     

    How patient are you? How many extras will you be wanting? For a basic
    system, someone with a burner and broadband is probly better off
    downloading, but if you want dead tree doentation or you don't want
    to spend the time, then just buy a boxed set or loose CDs.
     

    I'm an everything but the kitchen sink type, and I opted for SUSE
    Linux Pro. It's less expensive than some distributions that don't
    include as much. But if you have a friend that already has a set and
    you don't need the hardcopy doentation, the license allows him to
    give you a copy.

    If you're a tinkerer then you might want to look at something like
    Debian or Gentoo. You might also want to start with something more
    automatic and then switch when you get more comfortable with Linux.

    There's no "one size fits all." But chances are that any of the major
    distributions will be a good start.

    --
    Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz, SysProg and JOAT

    Unsolicited bulk E-mail will be subject to legal action. I reserve
    the right to publicly post or ridicule any abusive E-mail.

    Reply to domain Patriot dot net user shmuel+news to contact me. Do
    not reply to lspace.org

    Shmuel Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    On 2004-01-08, starwars <homelinux.net> wrote: 

    Go down to your best book/magazine store and look for the latest issue of
    Linux Format, a linux periodical from the UK. It's outrageously overpriced
    ($13) but it usually has a ton of software on included CD discs. The
    current issue has one disc of Suse and one of Slackware. Buy it. Install
    Suse first. If you do Suse successfully play around a little. When you're
    feeling all warm and fuzzy, try installing the Slackware distro. These two
    distros represent the best of each end of the Linux spectrum, a great
    cross selection.

    nb
    notbob Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    In <btjv7s$f5o$rrz.uni-hamburg.de>, on 01/08/2004
    at 04:07 PM, "Kilian A. Foth" <uni-hamburg.de>
    said:
     

    Or are designed by incompetents who ignore standards. There was a
    recent thread on one such drive.
     

    That's one of the reasons that I bought a boxed set.

    --
    Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz, SysProg and JOAT

    Unsolicited bulk E-mail will be subject to legal action. I reserve
    the right to publicly post or ridicule any abusive E-mail.

    Reply to domain Patriot dot net user shmuel+news to contact me. Do
    not reply to lspace.org

    Shmuel Guest

  20. #20

    Default Re: Some Newbie Questions

    In <vyGebhFRib$$com>, on 01/08/2004
    at 08:07 PM, Joe <com> said:
     

    No.

    --
    Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz, SysProg and JOAT

    Unsolicited bulk E-mail will be subject to legal action. I reserve
    the right to publicly post or ridicule any abusive E-mail.

    Reply to domain Patriot dot net user shmuel+news to contact me. Do
    not reply to lspace.org

    Shmuel Guest

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