Hi,

Why do you want to do that? I think you need to know the internal of the
SQL Server storage mechanism.

I suggest you check with Kalen Delaney's "Inside SQL Server" series, 7.0
and 2000. It introduces some commands for viewing SQL Server internal
storage.


This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

Regards,

Bill Cheng
Microsoft Support Engineer
--------------------
| Content-Class: urn:content-classes:message
| From: <ghamelfmco.com>
| Sender: <ghamelfmco.com>
| Subject: Space used in a column
| Date: Fri, 4 Jul 2003 05:51:32 -0700
| Lines: 10
| Message-ID: <09ac01c3422a$fe81e090$a501280aphx.gbl>
| MIME-Version: 1.0
| Content-Type: text/plain;
| cht="iso-8859-1"
| Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
| X-Newsreader: Microsoft CDO for Windows 2000
| X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V5.50.4910.0300
| Thread-Index: AcNCKv6Bvctp5f4UTgWrStgfXzhGYA==
| Newsgroups: microsoft.public.sqlserver.programming
| Path: cpmsftngxa09.phx.gbl
| Xref: cpmsftngxa09.phx.gbl microsoft.public.sqlserver.programming:35003
| NNTP-Posting-Host: TK2MSFTNGXA13 10.40.1.165
| X-Tomcat-NG: microsoft.public.sqlserver.programming
|
| How cabn you calculate the actual row size after multiple
| column where deleted and added.
|
| The formula works fine if the table are not modified. but
| id you remove integer or float value from a table the
| space is not recovered.
|
|
|
|
|