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Stiching - Photography

Paul Thanks for the help. Much better than trying to read on screen help which got me nowhere. Duncan "Paul Worden" <printswestonNOSPAMbigpond.com> wrote in message news:jC0Qa.325$k57.11493newsfeeds.bigpond.com... > Overlap at least 30%. Use a tripod if you can, but whatever you use, keep > the horizon level. > If the camera supports it, use auto exposure on the first shot, then lock > the exposure for the others. > Shoot Left to Right > Panorama Tools is free and VERY good, but has a moderate learning curve. > It's worth buying the $30 PT Assembler to go with it. > Photovista ...

  1. #1

    Default Re: Stiching

    Paul

    Thanks for the help.
    Much better than trying to read on screen help which got me nowhere.
    Duncan


    "Paul Worden" <printswestonNOSPAMbigpond.com> wrote in message
    news:jC0Qa.325$k57.11493newsfeeds.bigpond.com...
    > Overlap at least 30%. Use a tripod if you can, but whatever you use, keep
    > the horizon level.
    > If the camera supports it, use auto exposure on the first shot, then lock
    > the exposure for the others.
    > Shoot Left to Right
    > Panorama Tools is free and VERY good, but has a moderate learning curve.
    > It's worth buying the $30 PT Assembler to go with it.
    > Photovista is simple and works well for evenly exposed shots.
    >
    > Stitch before doing anything else - most stitchers require identically
    sized
    > images.
    >
    > You can manually stitch in Photoshop by creating an image big enough for
    the
    > multiple images, then open each image in turn and drag and drop into the
    > panorama image. That will create a new layer for each segment. Adjust
    layer
    > opacity to about 50% one layer at a time and line them up using Move and
    > Transorm/Rotate tools, then restore to 100% Opacity. Finish by deleting
    the
    > edge of each join with a 25-50 pixel feather and adjusting brightness if
    > required so you can't see the joins. Fix any oddities with the clone tool.
    > (About 1/2 hours works for 3 to 5 images.).
    >
    > --
    > Paul Worden
    > remove NOSPAM from email address to reply
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Duncan Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Stiching

    "Duncan" <duncan(remove)smith99(remove)hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:3f105a66$0$29650$fa0fcedblovejoy.zen.co.uk.. .
    > Have tried stitching photos together to create an wide panorama but end
    > result very poor.
    >
    > Any tips - I am using Ulead version 8.
    >
    > Also is it possible to hand hold the camera or is there a motorised
    tripod.
    >
    > I need to create some internals of properties and externals of gardens for
    > web site 'virtual tours'.
    >
    It depends on your camera, but if you can fit a wide angle lens or fisheye
    lens, you would reduce the number of images you have to work with
    considerably. For indoor panos, it is virtually essential to mount your
    camera so that it rotates about the nodal point of the lens. This will
    avoid all problems caused by parallax. (You want the image processing to be
    as straightforward as possible).

    I agree that Panorama Tools with either PTAssembler or PTGui or PTMac is the
    way to go. You would find it extremely helpful to register with the pano
    tools discussion group at [url]http://groups./group/PanoTools/[/url] . They
    will have come across all the problems you are going to have. You can also
    see the sort of results other people are getting and how they got them.

    There are several tutorials around for Panorama Tools. On no account
    attempt to use it without one of the three helpers mentioned above. I have
    a tutorial for PTGui at [url]http://homepage.ntlworld.com/j.houghton/pttute.htm[/url]
    , which is a beginner's guide. PTAssembler and PTMac are very similar.

    John


    John Houghton Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Stiching

    Hi John,

    A fisheye lens will have a curvature at the edges which makes
    matching the stitch area difficult. Even my point-n-shoot camera with a
    38mm lens introduces some curvature. That's why most recommend shooting
    with about 1/3 overlap to give you an area with the least curvature and
    the best chance of matching the stitch area on both photos. I select an
    area about 1/3 in from the edge with the least amount of conflict, crop
    each pair so I have about 1/8" overlap and use the clone tool to blend
    the stitch. Scenery and buildings are pretty easy to fix but it takes a
    lot of effort to match animals and people, especially faces. Photos with
    a lot of horizonal lines(curbs, sidewalks, fences, etc)in the stitching
    area present more problems the her you get from the center of your
    photos.

    For a beginner, it will be easier and take less time to stitch more
    pictures than correcting mismatched edges with fewer pictures. With
    experience, most will learn to take their panoramic intended photos with
    the knowledge of where the problem areas will be and allow for them.

    Just my opinion,

    Chuck


    John Houghton wrote:
     [/ref]

    It depends on your camera, but if you can fit a wide angle lens or
    fisheye
    lens, you would reduce the number of images you have to work with
    considerably. For indoor panos, it is virtually essential to mount
    your
    camera so that it rotates about the nodal point of the lens. This will
    avoid all problems caused by parallax. (You want the image processing
    to be
    as straightforward as possible).


    John
    cdcochran Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Stiching

    "cdcochran" <com> wrote in message
    news:com... 

    Curvature is not a problem - it can be easily corrected by software. You
    are making things difficult for yourself by trying to make images match up
    when they cannot (except possibly along a line midway across the overlap
    area). You really should try Panorama Tools with PTGui or PTAssembler. You
    can output the stitched image as a layered .PSD file with masks. The
    individual images will be transformed so that they match up within a pixel
    or two over a large area. Any problems caused by object movement or
    parallax can usually be dealt with by re-routing the seams (via edits to the
    layer masks). It is seldom necessary to resort to cloning.

    You can also correct for converging verticals and curved horizons very
    simply. You obviously take a lot of care making panoramas the way that you
    do, but I feel sure you would appreciate the precision stitching that can be
    easily achieved whilst retaining the ability to edit the layered result in
    Photoshop.

    Try Pano Tools and PTGui on a 30 day free trial from www.ptgui.com . It
    takes a bit of time to learn how to use it effectively, but there's a sample
    quickstart project included in my tutorial that can be successfully
    completed within half-an-hour or so and should convince you that it's a
    superior way of doing the job.

    http://homepage.ntlworld.com/j.houghton/pttute.htm

    John


    John Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Stiching

    On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 19:55:52 GMT, cdcochran <com>
    wrote:
     

    I've used the Oly E-20N with the lens at 18 mm and about a quarter
    over lap.. Then stitching with Photoshop Elements. I haven't had to
    do any blending at the stitch point. The photo includes a fence,
    paved road, house with siding and a drive way. The finished photo
    covers about 270 degrees.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI EN73 & ARRL Life Member)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
    N833R World's oldest Debonair? (S# CD-2)

    <snip for bandwidth>
    Roger Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Stiching

    Hi, Duncan.

    I would strongly recommend that you give Panorama factory a try. Very
    simple to use, and the results are all that I would want.

    HTH

    Tim S.


    "Duncan" <duncan(remove)smith99(remove)hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:3f105a66$0$29650$zen.co.uk... 
    tripod. 


    tim Guest

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