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To X or not to X - Mac Applications & Software

I'm sure that this has been discussed before, so I apologize in advance. I bought my eMac 700 soon after it was released about 13 months ago. I put both 9.2 and 10.1 on separate partitions, with the idea that I would learn X at my own pace while still utilizing what I was used to on my previous machine. It became apparent at the time that X was slower in many respects compared to 9. I figured this new OS needed time to mature, so I put any further effort on hold. I also passed on Apple's invite to ...

  1. #1

    Default To X or not to X

    I'm sure that this has been discussed before, so I apologize in
    advance.

    I bought my eMac 700 soon after it was released about 13 months ago.
    I put both 9.2 and 10.1 on separate partitions, with the idea that I
    would learn X at my own pace while still utilizing what I was used to
    on my previous machine. It became apparent at the time that X was
    slower in many respects compared to 9. I figured this new OS needed
    time to mature, so I put any further effort on hold. I also passed on
    Apple's invite to upgrade to Jaguar.

    OS 9 has been very stable for me during this last year. But I see
    that Apple is going to release Panther soon (?) and I'm wondering if
    it's time to look at X again.

    I'd like to hear from users familiar with both systems that can give
    me a fair comparison. Did Jaguar speed things up? Does Panther promise
    to do more in this regard? The all important: are there now enough
    stable apps for X to effectively replace a well-rounded 9? Put another
    way: what apps and/or functions available to 9 have still not been
    written for X?

    I've been reading this group for the past week or so. It seems there
    are lots of glitches and whatnot that demand familiarity with Unix to
    fix, or possibly have no fix. Can I get some objective commentary?
    Thanks.

    Rick
    Sea Jhett Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: To X or not to X

    In article <3qk7araazn.fsfshell4.tdl.com>, Phil Stripling
    <phil_striplingcieux.zzn.com> wrote:
    > If you need a compelling reason to swtich to X, it doesn't sound like you
    > have one. In your position, I wouldn't switch. However, I encourage you
    > to. You'll find the new OS way better in virtually all respects than the
    > classic OS. The price is reasonable. My only request is that you forego
    > classic operation completely and make the switch. Trying to dip a toe in
    > the water is just like doing that at the river, lake, or ocean -- much too
    > cold. But if you just plunge in and take the shock, you're okay with it
    > after a short while.
    I would second Phil's recommendation. I too have had both OSs available
    for quite some time and have experimented with OS X. I have read
    extensively the opinions of those who have switched and those who
    haven't. I expect I'll get flamed for this, but my opinion is that the
    people who are happiest with OS X are comprised primarily (but not
    exclusively) of three types:

    (a) UNIX users who often are new to Macs but are now happy they have the
    Mac command-line option and really don't want a GUI anyway;
    (b) newbies (people who have never used the Mac OS--or even
    Windows--before); and
    (c) technical folks who perform a support role to multiple users (e.g.
    university computing lab managers, tech support at a graphic design firm,
    etc).

    People who use their Macs to earn a living, especially those without ready
    access to a technical support person, and who have used Macs for a long
    time and know them well, tend to find OS 9 a better choice for the moment.

    Much of my above-stated opinion is based on a discussion awhile back on
    MacInTouch; you might find this thread interesting (if long):
    [url]http://www.macintouch.com/mosxjust01.html[/url]

    If OS X-compatible software will only cost you a few dollars and you are
    eager to be on the bleeding edge, then go for it. If, like me, you find
    that replacing all the software you normally use and depend on will end up
    costing you several thousand dollars, you may want to think again. As Phil
    implies, there is little point in "converting" to OS X only to spend most
    of your time running software in Classic mode, unless OS X gives you
    something you really can't live without (e.g. some of the recent iApps
    that Apple has put out for the general user market). If iChat turns your
    crank, you don't have much choice; you'll have to go X. OTOH, unless cost
    is not a concern, there is little value in buying a pile of new software
    to do little more than what your existing software will do.

    For me, using OS X would slow down my workflow quite considerably. Like
    you, I have found OS 9 to be sufficiently stable, and fiddling with some
    of the more irksome "features" of the OS X finder and the dock wastes more
    of my time (and exasperation level) than the occasional re-boot does. I
    know how to trouble-shoot most problems in OS 9 but would be a babe in the
    woods in OS X, and I don't have easy access to knowledgeable support
    people (at least not without paying the $60-70/hr.)

    In the long run, of course, we'll all have to change. But to put that off
    until OS X is as fully functional (to me) as OS 9, I recently bought a new
    G4, one of the last few that will boot in OS 9. In time, I hope that OS X
    will come around to being more Mac-like rather than NEXT-like, as it is
    now. Steve Jobs touting Pather as a more 'user-centric' OS than
    'computer-centric' (as NEXT and Jaguar are) is a hopeful sign that OS X
    will mature into a more useful and user-friendly operating system.

    Good luck with whatever you decide.

    --
    Remove *NOSPAM* from edress
    Earl Misanchuk Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: To X or not to X

    Here's my opinion. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. If your computer is
    doing everything you want your computer to do, there is little to gain
    from switching to X.

    I currently switch from 9 to X and back frequently. X has better
    support for multilanguage fonts, browsers and text editors, and since I
    am a "language nut" I need/want X's power in that department. However I
    consider the user interface in X to be hideous, so I continue to do my
    English-only and graphics-oriented computing in 9.
    Rick Harrison Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: To X or not to X

    > of your time running software in Classic mode, unless OS X gives you
    > something you really can't live without (e.g. some of the recent iApps
    > that Apple has put out for the general user market). If iChat turns your
    > crank, you don't have much choice; you'll have to go X.
    Until somebody makes an OS X emulator that runs under OS 9.
    Rick Harrison Guest

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