Professional Web Applications Themes

transition from Elements to full Photoshop - Adobe Photoshop Elements

I'm finally getting full Photoshop. I wanted to play with Elements for a while, and then consider the full version. I'm looking forward to working with masks, curves, channels, and recipes/ actions. Any other advice on what I should be playing around with at first?...

  1. #1

    Default transition from Elements to full Photoshop

    I'm finally getting full Photoshop. I wanted to play with Elements for a while, and then consider the full version. I'm looking forward to working with masks, curves, channels, and recipes/ actions. Any other advice on what I should be playing around with at first?
    Eric_Matthes@adobeforums.com Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: transition from Elements to full Photoshop

    Eric

    From what I've seen of your photos, you will probably find curves useful for your landscape images. Do a google search for Curves tutorials Photoshop + Curves.

    I think your question would be easier to answer if folks knew what you like to do with your image editing software. Improving photos, creating web graphics, creative stuff, use selection tools, BW conversion etc?
    Mark_Reibman@adobeforums.com Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: transition from Elements to full Photoshop

    Why do you say curves should be specifically useful for landscape images?

    I will be doing mostly landscape work. My normal workflow is to adjust levels, adjust brightness/contrast, and bump up the saturation a touch. I rarely change the brightness/contrast sliders, but I usually check them out.
    I do resize for web images often, and I've played around with BW conversion a little for winter mountain scenes. As far as web work, I'm looking forward to being able to create an action to resize down to web size and thumb size efficiently, and for creating drop shadows with the settings I like automatically.
    Eric_Matthes@adobeforums.com Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: transition from Elements to full Photoshop

    Eric, as I understand it, the tools Brightness/Contrast, Levels, and Curves
    represent a progression in control of the tones in an image. Brightness and
    Contrast are the most basic and provide the least control over image
    quality: one overall adjustment slider for each. Levels is a step up:
    three adjustment sliders for the RGB composite and/or three adjustment
    sliders each for the red, green, and blue channels - white point, black
    point, and midpoint. Curves is at the top of the heap: 256 separate
    adjustments for the RGB composite (and in full Photoshop, 256 for each of R,
    G, and B). Many pro workflows rely almost exclusively on Curves with a dash
    of Levels; the B/C tool is virtually non-existent. There's a whole book on
    color correction using Curves ("Professional Photoshop - The Classic Guide
    to Color Correction" by Dan Margulis). The message seems to be, "Master
    Curves, and you master Photoshop color and tone correction."

    Chuck


    Chuck_Snyder@adobeforums.com Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: transition from Elements to full Photoshop

    I've just been reading up on curves, and I can't wait to start using it. I've read in this forum of a curve download available for elements. Is this the same as Photoshop's curves, except that you can only make RGB adjustments, no single-channel adjustments?
    Eric_Matthes@adobeforums.com Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: transition from Elements to full Photoshop

    Eric, that's essentially true - just composite, no R, G, B. It's also
    available only as an adjustment layer, not a direct application to an image
    layer. I consider that more of an advantage than a disadvantage, though; I
    prefer the use of adjustment layers because they don't 'bruise the pixels'
    of the image layer.


    Chuck_Snyder@adobeforums.com Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: transition from Elements to full Photoshop

    Eric,

    I still don't know that much about curves. Thanks to Chuck for elaborating. I didn't know that there was a book that dealt with it. But here are a couple of brief overviews on the use of curves.

    <http://www.apple.com/creative/resources/ttphotoshop/>

    <http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/command_primer.shtml>
    Mark_Reibman@adobeforums.com Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: transition from Elements to full Photoshop

    Mark, that Apple link is just incredible! Thanks a lot!

    Ray


    Ray Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: transition from Elements to full Photoshop

    I agree - very useful (I'm still marvelling over my ability to watch these videos - the novelty of broadband hasn't worn off yet!)

    Susan S.

    Edit - the one on removing jpeg artefacts on the same page looks extremely useful...
    Susan_S.@adobeforums.com Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: transition from Elements to full Photoshop

    com wrote: 

    Just to add to the posts already made by others, I won't go into curves etc.

    You will want to check out the measure tool. It is useful for
    'straightening' photographs. I.E. Making the horizon horizontal etc.

    The Patch tool is also very useful for 'eliminating' unwanted objects
    and artifacts from an image.

    JP

    JP Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: transition from Elements to full Photoshop

    The difference between curves in Photoshop and Elements will be that in Elements you can only apply Curves in layer modes, rather than to specific channels (e.g., R, G, B) unless you separate the channels out into layers.

    Like everything, the parts of PS that you visit first should be dependent on what you do with images, The first thing I would be visiting in Photoshop is exploration of the color settings and soft-proofing...and I would also learn to use tool presets and workspaces (to help manage palettes). Really the most important parts of Photoshop will be the same things you have in Elements -- I work almost identically in PS and Elements to a point (most of my corrections are done in layers in either program, using the channel palette almost exclusively for work on alpha channels). That point would probably mostly have to do with automating functions with actions.

    The real area of grand exploration is Image Ready -- which often just gets dismissed. If you do anything with web images or have an interest in animation, rollovers, etc., that's where you will have the most to learn. If you'd really gotten the most out of Elements, you should have some familiarity with all those things you mentioned, as there are work-arounds for all.

    Color settings will offer a lot more opportunity. Calibrate. Without that, your previews can be deceiving, and your results...a crapshoot.

    Hope that helps!
    Richard_Lynch@adobeforums.com Guest

Similar Threads

  1. Harddrive full error when Installing Photoshop Elements in OS X
    By Christoph in forum Adobe Photoshop Elements
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: September 24th, 08:48 PM
  2. Elements 2.0 vs Photoshop 5
    By Bob & Linda Flood in forum Adobe Photoshop Elements
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: September 3rd, 11:07 AM
  3. Photoshop Elements vs. Photoshop Album
    By Frank Marino in forum Adobe Photoshop Elements
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: August 21st, 07:08 PM
  4. Photoshop Elements 2
    By HPB in forum Adobe Photoshop Elements
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: July 20th, 02:05 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139