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Two easy questions. - PERL Beginners

Never heard of a .plx, but the .pl and .cgi are really just naming convention. Having said that if you are running activestate perl, it normally installs with .pl associated with perl (but not cgi). If you are running nt4 (2k?) or greater you should be able to run myscript.pl without putting perl in front I think you can set up apache to only run (for example) .cgi's and not .pl's but I never have. -----Original Message----- From: Drue Reeves [mailto:net] Sent: Tuesday, 21 September 2004 12:58 To: Gunnar Hjalmarsson; org Subject: Two easy questions. Truly newbie questions.... Why do ...

  1. #1

    Default RE: Two easy questions.

    Never heard of a .plx, but the .pl and .cgi are really just naming
    convention.
    Having said that if you are running activestate perl, it normally installs
    with .pl associated with perl (but not cgi). If you are running nt4 (2k?)
    or greater you should be able to run myscript.pl without putting perl in
    front

    I think you can set up apache to only run (for example) .cgi's and not .pl's
    but I never have.

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Drue Reeves [mailto:net]
    Sent: Tuesday, 21 September 2004 12:58
    To: Gunnar Hjalmarsson; org
    Subject: Two easy questions.




    Truly newbie questions....

    Why do some scripts have a CGI extension while other a .pl and still other a
    ..plx? Does the .cgi extension give it some web characteristics?

    Is there a way to run my script without specifying "perl" before the script?
    In other words, I want to type c:\myscript.plx instead of c:\perl
    myscript.plx.

    Thanks,

    Drue


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    Adrian Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Two easy questions.

    You appear to be on a Windows system. The file extensions on Windows are for
    association. Hence, to answer your second question first, if you're on
    ActiveState Perl, all .pl extensions are automatically associated with perl, if
    you did it right, and just typing 'foo.pl' in the shell should run it. .cgi,
    ..pl, etc. It doesn't matter to the interpreter. It may however matter to how it
    is treated by the OS and other programs, such as a server.

    --
    -will
    http://www.wgunther.tk
    (the above message is double rot13 encoded for security reasons)

    Most Useful Perl Modules
    -strict
    -warnings
    -Devel::DProf
    -Benchmark
    -B::Dep
    -Data::Dumper
    -Clone
    -Perl::Tidy
    -Beautifier
    -DBD::SQLite

    WilliamGunther@aol.com Guest

  3. #3

    Default RE: Two easy questions.

    Hi!

    "assoc " and "ftype" commands are used to associate extension for
    particular file types..

     
    script? In other words, I want to type c:\myscript.plx >instead of c:\perl
    myscript.plx.

    yes you can, try "assoc /?" and "ftype /?" it'll tell how to associates
    file types.

    HTH
    Raymond

    -----Original Message-----
    From: com [mailto:com]
    Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 2004 8:37 AM
    To: net; org
    Subject: Re: Two easy questions.


    You appear to be on a Windows system. The file extensions on Windows are
    for
    association. Hence, to answer your second question first, if you're on
    ActiveState Perl, all .pl extensions are automatically associated with
    perl, if
    you did it right, and just typing 'foo.pl' in the shell should run it.
    ..cgi,
    ..pl, etc. It doesn't matter to the interpreter. It may however matter to
    how it
    is treated by the OS and other programs, such as a server.

    --
    -will
    http://www.wgunther.tk
    (the above message is double rot13 encoded for security reasons)

    Most Useful Perl Modules
    -strict
    -warnings
    -Devel::DProf
    -Benchmark
    -B::Dep
    -Data::Dumper
    -Clone
    -Perl::Tidy
    -Beautifier
    -DBD::SQLite


    --
    To unsubscribe, e-mail: org
    For additional commands, e-mail: org
    <http://learn.perl.org/> <http://learn.perl.org/first-response>


    Raymond Guest

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