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Unix SAN Storage - Linux / Unix Administration

Hi, I have an existing SUN server that has a SAN storage attached on it. It also has softwares like Appwrox(scheduler), Taradata (database client), Samba Share and a few more installed on it. Now suppose that I have a new unix server server and i switch the same SAN store from the old unix box and attach it to the new unix box. Will all the software installed work as is or will I have to reinstall all of them? Thanks....

  1. #1

    Default Unix SAN Storage

    Hi,

    I have an existing SUN server that has a SAN storage attached on it. It
    also has softwares like Appwrox(scheduler), Taradata (database client),
    Samba Share and a few more installed on it.

    Now suppose that I have a new unix server server and i switch the same
    SAN store from the old unix box and attach it to the new unix box. Will
    all the software installed work as is or will I have to reinstall all
    of them?

    Thanks.

    manish Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Unix SAN Storage

    On 18 Apr 2006 12:21:19 -0700
    "manish" <com> wrote:
     

    Solaris is pretty good, nay excellent at backwards compatibility, so I
    am confident to state that most if not all of your software will run
    without problems on a new Sun machine. I run software on a Solaris 10
    SPARC box that was compiled on an IPX running SunOS 4.1.4 more than 10
    years ago.


    --
    Stefaan A Eeckels
    --
    Never explain by malice what can be adequately explained by stupidity.
    However:
    Sufficiently advanced stupidity is indistinguishable from malice.
    Stefaan Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Unix SAN Storage

    manish wrote: 

    If the filesystems are in logical volumes, the volume groups will need
    to be properly exported before they are disconnected. Be sure to
    make a map file as they will be renumbered on the target host.

    If the filesystems are directly in the devices, the data will be there
    but
    the devices will be renumbered. There are several ways to tell what
    the mount point used to be. For UFS and fsck will tell you that.
    I like to touch a filename in its root that tells what it was, then
    mount
    by hand to /mnt, see where it should be, then umount and put into
    vfstab.

    Doug Guest

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