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Unsolicited fax strategy - Mac Networking

I have been getting a barrage of unsolicited faxes to my residential telephone line since we moved, even though we do not have a fax machine. I managed to capture a few of these annoying faxes on my Powerbook G4, and I called the removal numbers (each fax has a different number)...only to find it does not help. Big surprise. As far as I can tell, my only option is to change my home telephone number. But, I would prefer to hit these sbags where it hurts. Since all of these calls are "Out of Area", I figure they must ...

  1. #1

    Default Unsolicited fax strategy

    I have been getting a barrage of unsolicited faxes to my residential
    telephone line since we moved, even though we do not have a fax
    machine. I managed to capture a few of these annoying faxes on my
    Powerbook G4, and I called the removal numbers (each fax has a
    different number)...only to find it does not help. Big surprise.

    As far as I can tell, my only option is to change my home telephone
    number. But, I would prefer to hit these sbags where it hurts.
    Since all of these calls are "Out of Area", I figure they must be
    paying long distance. If I could somehow script my modem to pick up
    and keep their fax machine on the line for hours, I will not only tie
    up one of their lines, but make it cost a lot for them to call.

    I know nothing about modem scripting except for a few ATA commands.
    Does anyone know if it would be possible to put the connected modems
    into some kind of loop to keep them on the line? I would be willing
    to accept a stream of data over the line because I could probably just
    pipe it to /dev/null.

    Ultimately, I'd like to have a little daemon running that would pick
    up the modem if the time was between midnight and 6am every night and
    keep them on the line until 6am. Any ideas?
    Corey Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    In article <google.com>,
    com (Corey Menscher) wrote:
     

    Get your number listed on the national do-not-call list, then report
    them for violation of the do-not-call law.

    --
    Never play strip tarot.
    Michelle Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    In article <google.com>,
    com (Corey Menscher) wrote:
     


    I'm not sure that the "Do Not Call" List applies, as unsolicited faxes
    have already been illegal for some time. From the FCC site:
     

    To "hit them where it hurts" check FCC website for more info:
    http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/unwantedfaxes.html

    Good fight back info at Junkfax.org
    http://www.junkfax.org
    --
    Chuck Reti
    Detroit MI
    Chuck Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    In article <com>,
    Chuck Reti <com.invalid> wrote:
     

    Yes, but if they're calling a voice number that might not apply.

    --
    Never play strip tarot.
    Michelle Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    In article <google.com>,
    com (Corey Menscher) wrote:
     

    That happened to me when I moved earlier this year. It seems that my
    phone number was someone else's fax number before I got it. I tried
    unsubscribing from as many of them as possible, but some would never
    connect and I couldn't get them to stop after a few months. I finally
    ended up changing my phone number. It was a lot less trouble that way.

    --
    Mike Cohen - mike3k <at> onepost <dot> net
    Personal: http://www.mc-development.com/
    Mac News: http://www.macmegasite.com/
    Mike Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    In article <google.com>,
    com (Corey Menscher) wrote: 
    If you have the feature on your phone service, you can actually block
    any caller that does not give a caller ID identification. These faxes
    usually do not have one, in my experience.
    Check the phone book that is supplied by your carrier. I think we have
    Bellsouth, and it does have that feature.
    --
    Mamamia
    Mamamia Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    Chuck Reti <com.invalid> wrote:
     

    Get their line number from CID or the fax itself. Produce a doent
    in Word or something with totally black pages. Print 100 copies out
    your fax software. That should hurt a little :-)

    Oh and block your CID.

    -mhd
    -mhd Guest

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  9. #9

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    com (Corey Menscher) writes:
     

    Generally, the unsolicited faxes I receive have the same number for some
    place that coordinates do not fax numbers. I have also called the places
    directly, told them I just moved to this number and that they're calling my
    voice phone, and they stop.

    I also file complaints with whatever the consumer affairs department is
    called in the state I live in, the state the company faxing me is in, and
    their state of incorporation, if I can readily find it. I got a check for a
    few bucks from fines levied by one Attorney General for faxes sent by some
    travel agency as a result of many complaints filed by 'consumers' like me
    for the unsolicited faxes it sent.

    Good luck, but have fun with it.
    --
    Philip Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
    Legal Assistance on the Web | spam and read later. email to philip
    http://www.PhilipStripling.com/ | my domain is read daily.
    Phil Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    Thanks for all the responses! Unfortunately, I have tried to block
    calls that do not provide CID...but since they are coming in as "Out
    of Area" calls, this does not work. Verizon has verified this. There
    is no way to block these calls...I think the CID info is stripped on
    it's route to my residential phone provider rather than explicity
    blocked from their end.

    These faxes are definitely illegal, if I sued could cost the business
    up to $500 per incident. By law they are supposed to provide company
    info at the top of the fax, but ID they send is very cryptic and not
    useful for doing a reverse lookup. They also do not provide their fax
    number...just a "removal number" at the bottom that never seems to
    work. It would be nice to take them for that money, but it would be a
    lot of work and probably cost me money, too. Besides, my idea of
    "holding onto" their faxmodem connection could end up costing them a
    crapload if it's a call that lasts for hours.

    I was just wondering if anyone knows how to script a modem connection
    to mess with them. In the end, I'll probably just end up changing my
    phone number.

    com (Corey Menscher) wrote in message news:<google.com>... 
    Corey Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    Corey Menscher <com> wrote:
     


    The person who MAKES a telephone call has the ultimate control over the
    connection (unless it is to a telco operator or an emergency service who
    have special hold facilities). There is no way that the RECIPIENT can
    hold the call once the caller decides to terminate the call.

    The outgoing fax modem will automatically terminate the call as soon as
    it knows that the fax has been sent correctly, or it receives an error
    signal - so you have virtually no scope to hang on to the call and run
    up their charges.

    In the old days when all faxes had to be sent from real fax machines
    (which could always receive incoming calls) one could try to swamp their
    machine. One firm that I knew of had a 'free calls after midnight'
    facility and so fed their fax machine with a continuous loop of the junk
    faxes they'd received. This 'very long fax' was then sent after
    midnight to the junk faxer with the effect of emptying all his paper
    onto the floor full of his own and others' junk faxes. He never tried
    junk faxing that company again!
    Vernon Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    > From: Michelle Steiner <org> 
    >
    >Get your number listed on the national do-not-call list, then report
    >them for violation of the do-not-call law.[/ref]

    Um, yeah, that first. In the meantime, giv them a week or so, you
    could drop your DTE (serial port speed) to 300bps. I think that's as low as
    they go. It depends on your modem, but that might cause all kinds of errors.
    The response to those errors will vary, if so. If that doesn't result in the
    desired effect, you _might_ be able to drop your DCE to match, although the
    fax commands for doing anything of the sort will be obscure if they exist.

    Adjusting to lejitimate callers might take some doing (the fax ID
    string would be your key), but I imajin that the alternative is to let the
    spammers ring your phone off the hook and hav a chance of pre-empting someone
    desirable.

    (This is all short of doing your own programming to spuriously drop
    RTS, and I've read that Macs typically hav trouble with this (XON/XOFF flow
    control is still a safer assumption on a Mac)...too much trouble, unless
    there's some kind of fax terminal software for the Mac.)

    All told, if the do-not-call law has any teeth, then it'll be
    less trouble than making a programmer try to impede performance, not that
    they don't succeed without being asked.
    brewhaha@ecn.ab.ca Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    >Thanks for all the responses! Unfortunately, I have tried to block 

    Be assured that there is a way to track them down.
    But it might take some pressure. Some people could apply the pressure
    to Verizon themselves. Others would prefer to employ a lawyer or other
    investigator.
     

    I hate scaring up business for the sharks, but spammers are a good
    excuse. The key word is contingency. Your lawyer takes a percentage of your
    satisfaction. Or you could do some fancy negotiations and calculations based
    upon the lawyer's hourly rate and your willingness to gamble on the length of
    trial.

    Keep in mind that the issue of your lawyer's cost _might_ be of more
    concern to your opponent. I don't know. If the law's written clearly enough,
    then you shouldn't hav to ask a lawyer.
     

    Yeah, maybe it's a good idea for you, but unless others hav an
    interest in doing it (and this I presently doubt), then I don't think
    it'll be worth it at about $60/hour (maximum) (for the phone).
     [/ref]

    setserial /dev/ttyS0 speed 300

    That's about all I can say, authoritatively, without a lawyer
    present. Part of me asks why you don't just disable faxes when you're not
    there, but this doesn't address the problem at its source, who, is also
    causing other people grief. Fax doesn't do full duplex, and the speed
    negotiation seems to be strictly automatic. I've never seen Fax software that
    allows arbitrary modem speeds, so the commands for faking less than the
    modem's DCE capcity probably don't exist.
     [/ref]

    More work than it seems to be worth. No pay. It's right up Frenzy's
    alley, but this time I figure you'd be better off feeding a spammer to
    a shark. It's something that you just shouldn't hav to do.
    _______
    Computers do a lot of work...a lot of work that doesn't need doing.
    brewhaha@ecn.ab.ca Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    ab.ca, in article nntp:/%vfCb.157$Ur.4754localhost , wrote: 

    And I slid the decimal on that calculation.
    Everybody pays Candace Bergen about minimum waje, crudely speaking.
    '' Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    Corey Menscher (com), in article
    nntp:/google.com , wrote:
    (...) 

    You should be able to reverse THAT to a name. Maybe the fact
    that you wanted to waste this guy's time at $6/h and 100% tax would
    be worth something in court.

    Take his vacation. It might only be a bus ride to the coast
    for two weeks, but it's a hell of a lot more than the alternative.
    '' Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    On Wed, 10 Dec 2003 14:10:58 -0500, Corey Menscher wrote
    (in message <google.com>):
     
     

    As others in this thread have pointed out you probably can't "hold the
    line up" for any significant amount of time.

    I read an article on Spam recently (NY Times, maybe?) where the author
    made the point that the reason that Spam works is that some very
    reputable companies are willing to look the other way as to where their
    "contacts" come from... they can claim "innocence" because they are
    buffered by several layers of middlemen from the original Spammer who
    is usually some low-life operating out of a trailer in Florida.

    A principle in law is to go for the "deep pockets", ie someone who can
    pay. Presumably the faxes are advertising goods or services for some
    company. I would focus my efforts and ire on _that_ company rather
    than the company who sent the fax. My guess is that, just as in Spam,
    they will be different, so trying to call the "take my name off the
    list" number isn't going to get you satisfaction.

    People Spam because it works... there is money in it for somebody. Go
    after the people who who are making the big money, not the small fry
    bottom feeders who actually send out the Spam/Faxes.


    --

    Jack

    Jack Guest

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  19. #19

    Default Re: Unsolicited fax strategy

    speakeasy.net (Matthew Russotto) writes:
     

    I would think that if you filed a small claims action that would be enough
    to get you subpoena rights to discover who was at the source of the
    faxing. Of course this is all moot since the poor orignal poster just
    wants a good modem script.

    loulou
    Lou Guest

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