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Very Newbie Q: - MySQL

I mainly develop desktop apps and have been asked to look into MySQL. Is MySQL a web based app. only? Do you design forms, etc or is all the GUI designed for the web? TIA Michelle...

  1. #1

    Default Very Newbie Q:

    I mainly develop desktop apps and have been asked to look into MySQL.

    Is MySQL a web based app. only? Do you design forms, etc or is all the
    GUI designed for the web?

    TIA
    Michelle


    Michelle Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Very Newbie Q:

    Michelle M wrote: 


    No, MySQL is not a web app at all. It's true that MySQL is a popular
    choice of people developing web applications. But MySQL itself is an
    RDBMS server. It's used by all sorts of database-driven applications,
    not just web apps.

    In fact, MySQL itself has no technology specific to the web. It has no
    forms designer. It doesn't produce HTML or XML. It has no application
    GUI designer at all. MySQL does have connectors for clients written in
    Java, C/C+, .NET, etc. Other connectors for Perl, PHP, Python, and Ruby
    exist, but they're not even made by the MySQL company.

    The closest to a GUI that MySQL offers are some relatively simple
    administration tools: http://www.mysql.com/products/tools/
    But these are nothing like a forms-based application design environment
    like Microsoft Access or Visual Studio.

    For application development, people use an IDE like Visual Studio,
    Eclipse, NetBeans, or a web-design product like Dreamweaver. They all
    have features to connect to MySQL just as they would connect to Oracle,
    MS SQL Server, or DB2.

    Some people just use a text editor to write code in their favorite
    language. They write code utilizing the connector API.

    Regards,
    Bill K.
    Bill Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Very Newbie Q:

    Wow! Thanks Bill for that wealth of information.

    I am wondering if you can help answer the following, since you obviously
    have a huge amount of knowledge on this area.

    I will be developing in .NET application for this client. They currently
    run SQL Server 2000.

    Is it possible to develop an application, that pulls information from their
    SQL 2000 into a .NET application and I use MySQL as a container for the
    back-end? Have I explained myself clearly?

    Many thanks
    Michelle


    "Bill Karwin" <com> wrote in message
    news:newsguy.com... 
    >
    >
    > No, MySQL is not a web app at all. It's true that MySQL is a popular
    > choice of people developing web applications. But MySQL itself is an
    > RDBMS server. It's used by all sorts of database-driven applications, not
    > just web apps.
    >
    > In fact, MySQL itself has no technology specific to the web. It has no
    > forms designer. It doesn't produce HTML or XML. It has no application
    > GUI designer at all. MySQL does have connectors for clients written in
    > Java, C/C+, .NET, etc. Other connectors for Perl, PHP, Python, and Ruby
    > exist, but they're not even made by the MySQL company.
    >
    > The closest to a GUI that MySQL offers are some relatively simple
    > administration tools: http://www.mysql.com/products/tools/
    > But these are nothing like a forms-based application design environment
    > like Microsoft Access or Visual Studio.
    >
    > For application development, people use an IDE like Visual Studio,
    > Eclipse, NetBeans, or a web-design product like Dreamweaver. They all
    > have features to connect to MySQL just as they would connect to Oracle, MS
    > SQL Server, or DB2.
    >
    > Some people just use a text editor to write code in their favorite
    > language. They write code utilizing the connector API.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Bill K.[/ref]


    Michelle Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Very Newbie Q:

    >I mainly develop desktop apps and have been asked to look into MySQL. 

    MySQL is a database. It doesn't really even HAVE a GUI (or even a
    non-programmer UI), although there are some tools to go with it
    that have GUIs, and it works nicely with web-based languages like
    PHP. Normally you wouldn't want users of web apps having command-line
    SQL access to MySQL anyway: it's usually a big security hole.
     

    MySQL is a database, and forms aren't part of it.
    If you want forms, use PHP or C or some other language.

    Gordon Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Very Newbie Q:

    On Thu, 26 Oct 2006 12:54:04 +1000, Michelle M wrote: 

    I'm not sure.

    MySQL does the same stuff that SQL Server 2000 does, more or less. It's
    just a lot cheaper to have MySQL as the database is far cheaper, and
    doesn't require you to purchase a Windows license to run on top of.

    --
    Pieces of seven! Pieces of seven! (Hrm, parroty error)
    Peter Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Very Newbie Q:

    Michelle M wrote: 


    I'm not sure I understand what you are trying to do. MySQL is usually
    an alternative to MS SQL Server. If you've already got one, there's
    usually no need to have the other.

    Do you mean that you need some kind of object persistence solution for
    application data? I think there must be other more transparent
    persistence solutions for object persistence in .NET. Googling for
    ".net object persistence" shows many such solutions, and articles about
    how to do it.

    Regards,
    Bill K.
    Bill Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Very Newbie Q:

    The application that I need to write is like an umbrella to existing
    systems.

    The client has 3 Servers all running SQL Server 2000. I'm not changing the
    existing apps, just writing an umbrella program that will pull informatin
    from all 3 and crunch some information. These 3 systems must stay in place.
    The application that I will write will be a desktop application using VB.NET
    so that a GUI can be created. The application is also multi-user.

    The dilemna that I need to sort out is, what back-end 'container' should I
    use to dump this data into before I need to extrapolate the information that
    I need? I am using Visual Studio 2005 (professional) which comes with SQL
    Server Express 2005. Someone has also recently told me about MySQL as an
    alternative.

    As I'm new to the SQL side of things, that's why I'm posting to those who
    have more understanding.

    I'm looking for some direction as to what is the general way of doing things
    in the development phase, especially when the client has a different SQL
    version to what I have in the development environment.

    I don't know whether there is any issue to using either MySQL / SQL Exp 2005
    during development and then just installing the product, but using the
    client's SQL Server 2000. I don't have SQL Server 2000 on my machine so I
    can't test if there is any issues that I need to be aware of.

    Any help is much appreciated.

    Michelle



    "Gordon Burditt" <org> wrote in message
    news:supernews.com... 
    >
    > MySQL is a database. It doesn't really even HAVE a GUI (or even a
    > non-programmer UI), although there are some tools to go with it
    > that have GUIs, and it works nicely with web-based languages like
    > PHP. Normally you wouldn't want users of web apps having command-line
    > SQL access to MySQL anyway: it's usually a big security hole.

    >
    > MySQL is a database, and forms aren't part of it.
    > If you want forms, use PHP or C or some other language.
    >[/ref]


    Michelle Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Very Newbie Q:

    com.au says... 

    Sounds like your taking (some/all?) source data from three separate MSSQL
    "data marts" and combining them into a single "data warehouse". Some
    level of integration of the data from the three separate data sources will
    be attempted? Your "back end container" application will be for reporting
    rather than transactional purposes?

    If my assumption is correct, then which database you use (MSSQL, MySQL,
    others) will possibly be driven more by the ETL (extract/transform/load)
    mechanism that you use than any other factor. Get an intro book on data
    warehousing concepts.

    Geoff M
    Geoff Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Very Newbie Q:

    Geoff Muldoon wrote: 
    >
    >
    > Sounds like your taking (some/all?) source data from three separate MSSQL
    > "data marts" and combining them into a single "data warehouse". Some
    > level of integration of the data from the three separate data sources will
    > be attempted? Your "back end container" application will be for reporting
    > rather than transactional purposes?
    >
    > If my assumption is correct, then which database you use (MSSQL, MySQL,
    > others) will possibly be driven more by the ETL (extract/transform/load)
    > mechanism that you use than any other factor. Get an intro book on data
    > warehousing concepts.
    >
    > Geoff M[/ref]

    I agree with Geoff. Also, you'll want to get the same version of SQL
    Server on your machine as the customer has. There are some small - but
    important - differences (which I won't get into here as this is the
    wrong group) between the two. And although your app may run on your
    machine just fine, when you get it on the customer's machine it may fail
    miserably.

    --
    ==================
    Remove the "x" from my email address
    Jerry Stuckle
    JDS Computer Training Corp.
    net
    ==================
    Jerry Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Very Newbie Q:

    Thank you both Geoff and Jerry for replying. I will get my face into info
    on data warehousing. I may re-open this post if I have any questions. Is
    this the correct newsgroup for such questions or is there a better one that
    I should post to.

    Many thanks
    Michelle


    "Michelle M" <com.au> wrote in message
    news:supernews.com... 
    >>
    >> MySQL is a database. It doesn't really even HAVE a GUI (or even a
    >> non-programmer UI), although there are some tools to go with it
    >> that have GUIs, and it works nicely with web-based languages like
    >> PHP. Normally you wouldn't want users of web apps having command-line
    >> SQL access to MySQL anyway: it's usually a big security hole.
    >> 
    >>
    >> MySQL is a database, and forms aren't part of it.
    >> If you want forms, use PHP or C or some other language.
    >>[/ref]
    >
    >[/ref]


    Michelle Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Very Newbie Q:

    Michelle M wrote: 
    >>
    >>[/ref]
    >
    >[/ref]

    Michelle,

    This would be the correct place to ask questions about MySQL.

    However, I agree with others. MySQL is a database, similar to SQL
    Server. Since you already have SQL Server, it would make much more
    sense to use it. And that would be another newsgroup such as
    comp.database.ms-sqlserver.

    --
    ==================
    Remove the "x" from my email address
    Jerry Stuckle
    JDS Computer Training Corp.
    net
    ==================
    Jerry Guest

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