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What is the story with fonts? - Adobe Indesign Macintosh

My well doented problems with one particular ID file can be read by those with time on their hands in the riveting ‘’ Cognoscenti say fonts, fonts, fonts. So I have been examining the issue. When I migrated to OS X last year I followed best practice guidelines and managed my fonts with Suitcase....

  1. #1

    Default What is the story with fonts?

    My well doented problems with one particular ID file can be read by those with time on their hands in the riveting ‘’ Cognoscenti say fonts, fonts, fonts. So I have been examining the issue. When I migrated to OS X last year I followed best practice guidelines and managed my fonts with Suitcase.
    brendan_lyons@adobeforums.com Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    Hi there

    We use InDesign with Suitcase XI here (on Panther and Tiger), and have found fonts to be OK once sorted out. The main thing here is to get your head around the ways OSX sees and places fonts, and organise them as you need them. Also check and mend your fonts with FontDoctor, which comes with Suitcase (or it did with v. XI)

    Here is a link to a post on the apple site that helps you understand what fonts are need by OSX, and where they should be. You can strip out others.

    <http://discussions.apple.com/thread.jspa?messageID=607630&#607630>

    Please note that InDesign installs loads of fonts in HD>Library>Application Support>Adobe>Fonts. Only the fonts in the 'Reqrd' subfolder in the above location is needed, the rest can go.

    Once you flush out all uneeded fonts, you can forget Font Book - it becomes irrelevant. You don't need ANY fonts in your user/Library/Fonts folder, BTW.

    HTH
    Macfool
    Martin_Cross@adobeforums.com Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    When I migrated to OS X I set up my fonts on the basis of the advice in the Suitcase Best Practice PDF. This worked fine, was sequential and logical but because of problems I have been experiencing I have also been doing some experimenting.

    You don't need ANY fonts in your user/Library/Fonts folder I did not have
    any fonts here but yesterday placed a few having read a posting by Nini
    Tjäder.





    My main query is why ID is accessing a font which it should not access, because if it can access this font then it can surely access all the other fonts in that location.
    brendan_lyons@adobeforums.com Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    And dump all the dfnts.
    Richard_Sohanchyk@adobeforums.com Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    I do nto recommend to place fonts in the user/ujsername/library/fonts folder at all. Somebody else did. I would only place things there for special reasons and temporarily.

    FontBook does not do anything by itself. It only does what you tell it too. It could be worth checking though that you haven't disabled fonts with FontBook or activated with it at the same time as you use another font management application. That's the msot important with it. Otherwise you can still use FontBook to look at fonts.

    If you don't see your fonts check permissions.
    Nini Tjäder Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    I'm all for getting rid of the dfnts, but is it normal for the dfnts to have more glyphs than the postcript version? I'm speaking in particular of Times.dfnt.

    Cindy
    Cindy_Johnston@adobeforums.com Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    Cindy, yes .dfonts normally have more glyphs than the postscript fonts. The only ones that might have more (depending on font) are the open type fonts.
    Nini Tjäder Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    Nini was I misunderstanding your advice?
    In another topic you wrote

    if you have fonts that you use on a daily basis - and those are not system
    fonts - you should preferrably not manage them via a font manager but
    put them either into the main library/fonts folder (for all users of machine
    and all applications) or the user libarary/fonts (for personal use of
    one user only). Much faster access to them than handling those too via
    a font manager.




    What I do not understand is why InDesign accesses one font that is stored in a particular location and not all the other fonts there.
    brendan_lyons@adobeforums.com Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    InDesign accesses all fonts residing in the main Library/Application Support/Adobe/Fonts and the main Library/Fonts and in Applications/Adobe InDesign (whatever comes after that)/ Fonts folder and the Users, username, Library, Fonts folder AND if you have Classic on the machine all fonts that are in the System Folder (for the Classic system)/Fonts (if you want it or not). Where you PLACE your fonts is another matter. The point is to not spread them all over the place but to decide where you want to have them AND that you have full read & write permissions to whichever folder you choose to put them in. If you don't neither ID or any other application will see them. Fonts that are placed in the Users/username/Library/Fonts have a further restriction: that only that particular user can see them and no other users if there are more than one on the machine.

    To this mix you can add using any of the existing font management applictions which makes deciding how and where to place your fonts even more important.

    One of my points was that fonts you use on a daily basis is best to put in the main Library/Fonts folder because all applications and all users on the machine can then access them.
    Nini Tjäder Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    Suitcase keeps a DATA VAULT Which we find needs to be removed on occasions as well as Deleting all cache files running applejack or font cache cleaners help.
    I would also Suggest start migrating to OPEN type fonts.
    ID and OSX seem to like those better.
    Matt_Geiger@adobeforums.com Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    Brendan: Always keep in mind there is no font management weirdness but, rather, weird font managers. ;-)
    Richard_Sohanchyk@adobeforums.com Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    There is some useful info here on organizing fonts in OS X through Panther. It does not deal with Tiger yet; Tiger seems to have a few more required system fonts.

    <http://software-robotics.com/docs/PDF-X-Robot_Font_Management.html>

    The multiple font locations in OS X make font management a lot more complicated. It's the thing I like least about OS X.

    I've stopped using Suitcase's "manage system fonts" function. Instead, I move and organize all the fonts that can safely be moved from their default installed system locations. The folders I set up for them are named so that I know where the fonts came from (e.g., "Fonts from User Library"). I could easily restore them to default locations if I ever needed to. Then I add them to Suitcase as sets.

    I replace .dfonts that remain in the system/library/fonts folder with Postscript versions (Helvetica, Courier, Symbol). All .dfonts are in locations where they can be controlled by me through Suitcase so that that they are never active and can't conflict with Postscript versions of these fonts.

    Note that MS Office has its own Fonts folder; more fonts to move and manage.
    Kathryn_Jenkins@adobeforums.com Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    Ms Office most of the time - but not always for some curios reason - installs its fonts into the Users/Username/Library/Fonts folder. And you cannot choose to not have them isntalled upon installation. You get them if you want it or not. Those can either be deleted or moved to another location of choice. Some of them are valuable to have installed as most webpages use the MS fonts (which normally are Truetype by the way). Main rule here again is to avoid having duplicate fonts all over the place.
    Nini Tjäder Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Font management weirdness

    Could be a font cache issue. Goto:

    Library>Caches>com.apple.ATS

    In this directory, you will find various sub folders. Inside these you will find called fonts.db

    Delete these.

    Restart your Mac.

    Kill Suitcase and every other font management program ever made, create a simple alias on your desktop from your Fonts folder from the top level Library and begin to enjoy better performance and a quick way to get fonts up and down.

    Aside from this, cull out all fonts in the Application Support sub-directories and all of the internal font folders within the InDesign font folder.

    We have 260 Macs onsite, and have had many and varied issues with fonts until we cut to the bone and cleared the decks.

    Replacing with the postscript version of the core fonts is a good thing, if you can't get your hands on the OpenType versions.

    Fraser
    Fraser_Edward_Crozier@adobeforums.com Guest

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