Professional Web Applications Themes

Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval on OS X? - Mac Programming

Is there a secure place to store eval info to limit an app to 30 days on OS X? It needs to be outside of the user prefs and the app itself. The information needs to be retained even if the app and prefs are removed. I have looked all for this info and have turned up nothing. Is this something people don't want to talk about?...

  1. #1

    Default Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval on OS X?

    Is there a secure place to store eval info to limit an app to 30 days on
    OS X? It needs to be outside of the user prefs and the app itself.
    The information needs to be retained even if the app and
    prefs are removed. I have looked all for this info and have turned up
    nothing. Is this something people don't want to talk about?
    Matthew Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval on OS X?

    In article <com>,
    Matthew Ross <com> wrote:
     

    Well, think about it for a moment: Talking publicly about how you do
    this means that someone who wants to bypass the restriction can easily
    do so.

    --
    Tom "Tom" Harrington
    Macaroni, Automated System Maintenance for Mac OS X.
    Version 1.4: Best cleanup yet, gets files other tools miss.
    See http://www.atomicbird.com/
    Tom Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval on OS X?

    On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 13:58:31 -0700, Tom Harrington wrote:
     
    >
    > Well, think about it for a moment: Talking publicly about how you do
    > this means that someone who wants to bypass the restriction can easily
    > do so.[/ref]

    I was hoping there might be some standard way to do it that was safe and
    private. I know I could create a file somewhere on the drive to do this.
    I just don't like the idea of doing that.

    Matthew Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval on OS X?

    Matthew Ross <com> wrote:
     [/ref]
    > I was hoping there might be some standard way to do it that was safe and
    > private. I know I could create a file somewhere on the drive to do this.
    > I just don't like the idea of doing that.[/ref]

    Okay, so let me get this straight. You want to store info - but not on
    the drive. You want this info to persist even if the user removes the
    app and its prefs - but not in a file. What were you thinking of doing?
    Trying to rewrite the PRAM? Subtly rearranging the books in the user's
    room to signify the date he started to use the app? Tattooing the info
    on the user's butt? m.


    --
    matt neuburg, phd = com, http://www.tidbits.com/matt/
    Read TidBITS! It's free and smart. http://www.tidbits.com
    matt Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval on OS X?

    In article <1g5i2dk.mmkbty1rp423sN%com>,
    com (matt neuburg) wrote:
     

    You'll need to use the Core Foundation interfaces to do that.

    Charles.
    Charles Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval onOS X?

    matt neuburg wrote:
     
    >>
    >>I was hoping there might be some standard way to do it that was safe and
    >>private. I know I could create a file somewhere on the drive to do this.
    >>I just don't like the idea of doing that.[/ref]
    >
    >
    > Okay, so let me get this straight. You want to store info - but not on
    > the drive. You want this info to persist even if the user removes the
    > app and its prefs - but not in a file. What were you thinking of doing?
    > Trying to rewrite the PRAM? Subtly rearranging the books in the user's
    > room to signify the date he started to use the app? Tattooing the info
    > on the user's butt? m.[/ref]

    You're thinking of selling something to Cher?

    --
    rick

    rick Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval on OS X?

    On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 23:18:48 +0000, matt neuburg wrote:
     
    >> I was hoping there might be some standard way to do it that was safe and
    >> private. I know I could create a file somewhere on the drive to do this.
    >> I just don't like the idea of doing that.[/ref]
    >
    > Okay, so let me get this straight. You want to store info - but not on
    > the drive. You want this info to persist even if the user removes the
    > app and its prefs - but not in a file. What were you thinking of doing?
    > Trying to rewrite the PRAM? Subtly rearranging the books in the user's
    > room to signify the date he started to use the app? Tattooing the info
    > on the user's butt? m.[/ref]

    I guess I can see how you would take it that way. I really meant to say I
    do not want to write a file just randomly anywhere on the drive. And if
    applications really just open a file on the drive somewhere to write this
    info, wouldn't you see it in a ktrace? Isn't there some kind of global
    repository for this info? Like application level preferences that are
    hidden/encrypted or something? I just can't see that writing a file would
    be affective. Like creating a file ".dontlookhere". Please tell me there
    is SOMETHING better.

    Matthew Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval on OS X?

    In article <com>,
    Matthew Ross <com> wrote:
     

    No, there isn't. Macs are quite open; what you see, as a user, is what
    there is. The system doesn't have any special hidden secret encrypted
    whatsis that your program can somehow see but the user can't. Any admin
    user can become root. Root can see *everything*. Any API you call to
    make something persistent is going to end up either writing to a file or
    writing to PRAM. Writing to PRAM is excessively evil.

    So there are basically three things you can do:

    1) Write the info to your preferences file. This will be fine for 95% of
    your users. The remaining 5% will figure out that if they trash the
    prefs file, they can restart the trial period. An unknown percentage
    (not 100%) of this group will be people who would have otherwise paid.

    2) Write the info to some other file somewhere. This will stump 90% of
    the remaining people from step 1. An unknown percentage of the few
    people who are left will figure out what's going on and use that
    knowledge to reset the trial period, and some percentage (probably quite
    low) of this group will be people who would have otherwise paid.

    3) Spend an excessive amount of time working on code obfuscated enough
    that it takes a knowledgeable person more than fifteen minutes to crack
    it. This might even get you an extra sale or two, but it's doubtful.
    Michael Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval onOS X?

    Hi Matthew,

    Matthew Ross <com> writes: 

    Why should there be a place "safe" for *you* on *my* computer? I
    would never knowingly buy such a machine for *my* use.

    benny
    Benjamin Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval on OS X?

    Michael Ash <com> wrote:
     
    >
    > No, there isn't. Macs are quite open; what you see, as a user, is what
    > there is. The system doesn't have any special hidden secret encrypted
    > whatsis that your program can somehow see but the user can't. Any admin
    > user can become root. Root can see *everything*. Any API you call to
    > make something persistent is going to end up either writing to a file or
    > writing to PRAM. Writing to PRAM is excessively evil.
    >
    > So there are basically three things you can do:
    >
    > 1) Write the info to your preferences file. This will be fine for 95% of
    > your users. The remaining 5% will figure out that if they trash the
    > prefs file, they can restart the trial period. An unknown percentage
    > (not 100%) of this group will be people who would have otherwise paid.
    >
    > 2) Write the info to some other file somewhere. This will stump 90% of
    > the remaining people from step 1. An unknown percentage of the few
    > people who are left will figure out what's going on and use that
    > knowledge to reset the trial period, and some percentage (probably quite
    > low) of this group will be people who would have otherwise paid.[/ref]

    I mean, basically, look - If I reeeeeally want to, I'm going to figure
    out how you're storing this info. But if your app is good and genuinely
    useful to me, and it's reasonably priced, I'm not going to want to, so
    why worry yourself?

    Oh, and just for completeness - yes, there's another solution: "phone
    home". That way the info isn't on the user's computer. I'll catch you if
    you try that, too... :) But again, that doesn't mean that I object to
    it. m.

    --
    matt neuburg, phd = com, http://www.tidbits.com/matt/
    Read TidBITS! It's free and smart. http://www.tidbits.com
    matt Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval on OS X?

    In article <mail-6D27F5.10505806122003localhost>,
    Michael Ash <com> wrote:
     

    And PRAM can be erased with a simple key combination at boot...
    Sean Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Where is the best place store information for a 30 day eval on OS X?

    In article <3fd117a4$0$209$xs4all.nl>,
    rick <nl> wrote:
     [/ref]

    If anyone can point to a framework that'll do either of the last two
    suggestions, I'll buy a copy.
     

    Dunno about Matt, but if Cher wants to buy my software, I'll sell.

    --
    Tom "Tom" Harrington
    Macaroni, Automated System Maintenance for Mac OS X.
    Version 1.4: Best cleanup yet, gets files other tools miss.
    See http://www.atomicbird.com/
    Tom Guest

Similar Threads

  1. Best way to store login information.
    By Supra LTD in forum Macromedia ColdFusion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: February 28th, 03:34 AM
  2. Where to store secret information
    By Chris Jackson in forum ASP.NET Security
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 13th, 04:47 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139