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Why no telnet? - Mac Applications & Software

I intentionally disabled telnet from ppp0, but not from en0. Also, the first few rules in my firewall.conf explicitly allow ALL IP packets to and from the machines on my ethernet. But the PC is unable to telnet to the iMac. FTP and HTTP both work OK....

  1. #1

    Default Why no telnet?

    I intentionally disabled telnet from ppp0,
    but not from en0. Also, the first few rules
    in my firewall.conf explicitly allow ALL IP
    packets to and from the machines on my ethernet.

    But the PC is unable to telnet to the iMac.
    FTP and HTTP both work OK.

    Wesley Groleau Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    In article <DkCdnXdVa5mroo6iXTWJkAgbronline.com>,
    Wesley Groleau <wesgroleaudespammed.com> wrote:
    > I intentionally disabled telnet from ppp0,
    > but not from en0. Also, the first few rules
    > in my firewall.conf explicitly allow ALL IP
    > packets to and from the machines on my ethernet.
    >
    > But the PC is unable to telnet to the iMac.
    > FTP and HTTP both work OK.
    Are you using Telnet or SSH on the PC to get to the iMac? You'll need to
    use an SSH client to connect to the iMac. The standard windows telnet
    client won't work.

    Steve
    Steve Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    Wesley Groleau <wesgroleaudespammed.com> wrote:
    > I intentionally disabled telnet from ppp0,
    > but not from en0. Also, the first few rules
    > in my firewall.conf explicitly allow ALL IP
    > packets to and from the machines on my ethernet.
    >
    > But the PC is unable to telnet to the iMac.
    > FTP and HTTP both work OK.
    >
    I believe the the telnet server is disabled by default in recent versions
    of OS X. You can enable it by editing the /etc/inetd.conf file. Locate
    the line that starts with #telnet and remove the # so that you the line
    begins with telnet. Save your changes and restart your computer.
    If you are familiar with using kill to send signals to running processes,
    you can send inetd a HUP signal instead of rebooting.
    --
    John J. Rushford
    j j r { a t } a l i s a { d o t } o r g
    [url]http://www.cs.du.edu/~jjr[/url]
    read-the-signature@send-spam-to-dev-null.com Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    [email]read-the-signaturesend-spam-to-dev-null.com[/email] writes:
    > I believe the the telnet server is disabled by default in recent versions
    > of OS X. You can enable it by editing the /etc/inetd.conf file.
    Many users may find it preferable to enable telnet in
    /etc/xinetd.d/telnet, where you can use the only_from parameter to
    limit access. This permits you to allow telnet from the LAN, where it
    is probablly safe, but not from outside, where telnet is not a very
    safe protocol.

    To enable the telnetd server after you have changed the disable = yes
    to "no" in /etc/xinetd.d/telnet, give the command `sudo killall -HUP
    xinetd' in a terminal.
    --

    Ronald Florence [url]www.18james.com[/url]
    Ronald Florence Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    In article <uebrvwzeov.fsfauda.18james.com>,
    Ronald Florence <ron18james.com> wrote:
    > [email]read-the-signaturesend-spam-to-dev-null.com[/email] writes:
    >
    > > I believe the the telnet server is disabled by default in recent versions
    > > of OS X. You can enable it by editing the /etc/inetd.conf file.
    >
    > Many users may find it preferable to enable telnet in
    > /etc/xinetd.d/telnet, where you can use the only_from parameter to
    > limit access. This permits you to allow telnet from the LAN, where it
    > is probablly safe, but not from outside, where telnet is not a very
    > safe protocol.
    >
    > To enable the telnetd server after you have changed the disable = yes
    > to "no" in /etc/xinetd.d/telnet, give the command `sudo killall -HUP
    > xinetd' in a terminal.
    If xinetd isn't already running, you may have to turn the FTP server on
    and off in the Sharing system prefs. Since the OP already has the FTP
    server running my advice won't apply, though.

    However, in my experience, you don't have to kill xinetd after changing
    a file. Unless I'm having a brain . :-)

    Doug

    --
    Doug Brown - La Grande, OR
    Idiot's Guide to Mac Cases - [url]http://www.ircandy.com/maccases/[/url]
    If you want to reply by email, remove "pleasenospam." and ".invalid"
    Doug Brown Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 03:02:48 GMT,
    Doug Brown (macg3pleasenospam.mac.com.invalid) wrote:
    > However, in my experience, you don't have to kill xinetd after changing
    > a file. Unless I'm having a brain . :-)
    I wouldn't go so far to say you're having a brain , but you are
    incorrect ...

    You have force xinetd to reread it's configuration file. The xinetd
    manpage says the appropriate signal to send for xinetd to reread the
    configuration file is SIGHUP. That would indicate that:
    killall -HUP xinetd
    is pretty necessary for xinetd to recognize changes in the config file.

    Beverly
    --
    Bev A. Kupf
    Bev's House of Pancakes
    Bev A. Kupf Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    In article <slrnbh6s8t.r64.bevakupfebv.mimnet.northwestern.e du>,
    "Bev A. Kupf" <bevakupfebv.mimnet.northwestern.edu> wrote:
    > You have force xinetd to reread it's configuration file. The xinetd
    > manpage says the appropriate signal to send for xinetd to reread the
    > configuration file is SIGHUP. That would indicate that:
    > killall -HUP xinetd
    > is pretty necessary for xinetd to recognize changes in the config file.
    Yep, it was a brain. :) I thought I read somewhere that xinetd
    checks the config file every time while it's running, but I'm obviously
    wrong. Just tested. Sorry bout that!

    Doug

    --
    Doug Brown - La Grande, OR
    Idiot's Guide to Mac Cases - [url]http://www.ircandy.com/maccases/[/url]
    If you want to reply by email, remove "pleasenospam." and ".invalid"
    Doug Brown Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    Ronald Florence wrote:
    > [email]read-the-signaturesend-spam-to-dev-null.com[/email] writes:
    >
    >>I believe the the telnet server is disabled by default in recent versions
    >>of OS X. You can enable it by editing the /etc/inetd.conf file.
    >
    > Many users may find it preferable to enable telnet in
    > /etc/xinetd.d/telnet, where you can use the only_from parameter to
    > limit access. This permits you to allow telnet from the LAN, where it
    Thank you both. I have it blocked in ipfw, but
    if I can do this as well, why not? :-)

    It used to work, I think even in 10.1.4 ...

    Wesley Groleau Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    andrewunix wrote:
    > default (or not even installing it by default), because the conventional
    > wisdom is that telnet is insecure anyway, buffer overflow or not.
    Indeed. No worries about security from one side
    of my basement to the other, but I definitely have
    almost everything blocked from the outside world.

    Wesley Groleau Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    In article <DkCdnXdVa5mroo6iXTWJkAgbronline.com>,
    Wesley Groleau <wesgroleaudespammed.com> wrote:
    >But the PC is unable to telnet to the iMac.
    OS X doesn't run a telnet server by default. Everyone's meant
    to be using 'ssh' by now.


    Simon Slavin Guest

  11. #11

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    Simon Slavin wrote:
    >>But the PC is unable to telnet to the iMac.
    >
    > OS X doesn't run a telnet server by default. Everyone's meant
    > to be using 'ssh' by now.
    Found that out. telnet is fine for me.
    That port is blocked from dialup, and from
    any IP outside of my subnet.

    And my subnet is a single crossover cable
    ethernet to ethernet, with all of it visible
    to anyone on either machine. :-)

    For _that_ situation, ssh isn't worth going for.

    Wesley Groleau Guest

  12. #12

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    Wesley Groleau wrote:
    > Simon Slavin wrote:
    >>>But the PC is unable to telnet to the iMac.
    >>
    >> OS X doesn't run a telnet server by default. Everyone's meant
    >> to be using 'ssh' by now.
    >
    > Found that out. telnet is fine for me.
    > That port is blocked from dialup, and from
    > any IP outside of my subnet.
    >
    > And my subnet is a single crossover cable
    > ethernet to ethernet, with all of it visible
    > to anyone on either machine. :-)
    >
    > For _that_ situation, ssh isn't worth going for.
    Except that it is more useful than telnet if you are into playing
    with port forwarding or thinking about things like exploiting NFS
    vulnerabilities to drop your ssh key into someone's home directory
    in order to be able to ssh into their account without knowing their
    password. If you just want to be able to do boring old telnet then
    then by all means stick with telnet:)

    --
    Ian Gregory
    Systems and Application Manager
    Learning and Information Services
    University of Hertfordshire
    Ian Gregory Guest

  13. #13

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    In article <7--cnWZ-eqewpIqiXTWJhggbronline.com>,
    Wesley Groleau <wesgroleaudespammed.com> wrote:
    > And my subnet is a single crossover cable
    > ethernet to ethernet, with all of it visible
    > to anyone on either machine. :-)
    >
    > For _that_ situation, ssh isn't worth going for.
    You make it sound like ssh is more difficult to use or something. :-)

    --
    Tom "Tom" Harrington
    Macaroni, Automated System Maintenance for Mac OS X.
    Version 1.4: Best cleanup yet, gets files other tools miss.
    See [url]http://www.atomicbird.com/[/url]
    Tom Harrington Guest

  14. #14

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    Tom Harrington wrote:
    > You make it sound like ssh is more difficult to use or something. :-)
    Didn't mean to imply that. I've used it before.
    It's quite simple--but not as simple as typing

    telnet iMac

    Wesley Groleau Guest

  15. #15

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    Ian Gregory wrote:
    > Except that it is more useful than telnet if you are into playing
    > with port forwarding or thinking about things like exploiting NFS
    > vulnerabilities to drop your ssh key into someone's home directory
    > in order to be able to ssh into their account without knowing their
    But I am not into any of those things.
    And if someone's thinking that about me,
    well, as far as I know, NFS can't get
    through my firewall.

    Wesley Groleau Guest

  16. #16

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    In article <BTWdnSPClYgGHIqiXTWJkAgbronline.com>,
    Wesley Groleau <wesgroleaudespammed.com> wrote:
    > Tom Harrington wrote:
    > > You make it sound like ssh is more difficult to use or something. :-)
    >
    > Didn't mean to imply that. I've used it before.
    > It's quite simple--but not as simple as typing
    >
    > telnet iMac
    Easier. I type:

    ssh orderly - with no further login required.

    KeS
    Kevin Stevens Guest

  17. #17

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    In article <BTWdnSPClYgGHIqiXTWJkAgbronline.com>,
    Wesley Groleau <wesgroleaudespammed.com> wrote:
    >Tom Harrington wrote:
    >> You make it sound like ssh is more difficult to use or something. :-)
    >
    >Didn't mean to imply that. I've used it before.
    >It's quite simple--but not as simple as typing
    >
    >telnet iMac
    Huh? If you have the same account name on both machines (the short name),
    all you need to type is

    ssh iMac

    or whatever the other machine's name is. And then it asks you for your
    password of course, just like with telnet, if you're not using public-key
    authentication.

    --
    Jon Bell <jtbellap8presby.edu> Presbyterian College
    Dept. of Physics and Computer Science Clinton, South Carolina USA
    Jon Bell Guest

  18. #18

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 00:12:05 -0500,
    Wesley Groleau (wesgroleaudespammed.com) wrote:
    > Tom Harrington wrote:
    >> You make it sound like ssh is more difficult to use or something. :-)
    >
    > Didn't mean to imply that. I've used it before.
    > It's quite simple--but not as simple as typing
    >
    > telnet iMac
    Why? You end up typing fewer characters if you type "ssh useriMac",
    because you no longer have to type the username at the telnet login
    prompt, and "ssh" has three fewer characters than "telnet".

    Also, you can make this even simpler. Add an alias to your ".cshrc"
    that reads something like "alias iMac 'ssh useriMac'", and then all
    you have to type at a shell prompt is "iMac" ..... and you're prompted
    for a password.

    Bev
    --
    Bev A. Kupf
    Bev's House of Pancakes
    Bev A. Kupf Guest

  19. #19

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    Jon Bell wrote:
    > or whatever the other machine's name is. And then it asks you for your
    > password of course, just like with telnet, if you're not using public-key
    > authentication.
    Oops, I forgot about that. I was thinking
    about the need to install keys on both sides.
    Although in my case, there would be the need
    to install SSH on the Wintel side.

    Wesley Groleau Guest

  20. #20

    Default Re: Why no telnet?

    In article <BTWdnSPClYgGHIqiXTWJkAgbronline.com>,
    Wesley Groleau <wesgroleaudespammed.com> wrote:
    >Tom Harrington wrote:
    >> You make it sound like ssh is more difficult to use or something. :-)
    >
    >Didn't mean to imply that. I've used it before.
    >It's quite simple--but not as simple as typing
    >
    >telnet iMac
    It's simpler:

    ssh iMac

    --
    Matthew T. Russotto [email]mrussottospeakeasy.net[/email]
    "Extremism in defense of liberty is no vice, and moderation in pursuit
    of justice is no virtue." But extreme restriction of liberty in pursuit of
    a modi of security is a very expensive vice.
    Matthew Russotto Guest

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