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Wireless ADSL network - Mac Applications & Software

Hi all, I have an ADSL connection and would like to add a second computer to it. The two computers are an iMac and a G4. In addition to the ADSL modem and a wireless router, what hardware do I need to connect the second computer (G4) to the network? Thanks in advance. ....FT...

  1. #1

    Default Wireless ADSL network

    Hi all,

    I have an ADSL connection and would like to add a second computer to it.
    The two computers are an iMac and a G4. In addition to the ADSL modem
    and a wireless router, what hardware do I need to connect the second
    computer (G4) to the network? Thanks in advance.


    ....FT
    Frater Guest

  2. #2

    Default Re: Wireless ADSL network

    In article <telus.net>,
    Frater Taciturnus <com> wrote:
     

    You'll need an airport card or equivalent for each computer.

    --
    Never play strip tarot.
    Michelle Guest

  3. #3

    Default Re: Wireless ADSL network

    In article <west.cox.net>,
    Michelle Steiner <org> wrote:
     
    >
    > You'll need an airport card or equivalent for each computer.[/ref]


    Wouldn't I need the airport card for the G4 only...I'm assuming I can
    plug the iMac directly into the router.


    ....FT
    Frater Guest

  4. #4

    Default Re: Wireless ADSL network

    In article <telus.net>,
    Frater Taciturnus <com> wrote:
     
    > >
    > > You'll need an airport card or equivalent for each computer.[/ref]
    >
    >
    > Wouldn't I need the airport card for the G4 only...I'm assuming I can
    > plug the iMac directly into the router.[/ref]

    Oh, I thought you wanted to make the entire network wireliess. Yes, if
    the wireless router has two jacks, you can do that. Some of them have
    only one jack, and that has to connect to the DSL modem.

    --Michelle

    --
    Never play strip tarot.
    Michelle Guest

  5. #5

    Default Re: Wireless ADSL network

    In article <west.cox.net>,
    Michelle Steiner <org> wrote:
     
    > >
    > >
    > > Wouldn't I need the airport card for the G4 only...I'm assuming I can
    > > plug the iMac directly into the router.[/ref]
    >
    > Oh, I thought you wanted to make the entire network wireliess. Yes, if
    > the wireless router has two jacks, you can do that. Some of them have
    > only one jack, and that has to connect to the DSL modem.
    >
    > --Michelle[/ref]


    Do you have any suggestions for a reliable, reasonably priced wireless
    router/card? TIA.


    ....FT
    Frater Guest

  6. #6

    Default Re: Wireless ADSL network

    In article <telus.net>,
    Frater Taciturnus <com> wrote:
     

    Several approaches.

    The easiest to setup and admin. Get an Airport Extreme base station
    from Apple (includes a wireless print server USB port; I have one of
    these and the print server is nice in that my wife and I are both using
    wireless laptops and do not want a printer plugged in it, or running a
    desktop system just so we can print). <smalldog.com> has refurbed units
    $172 with shipping via a link from <dealmac.com>. Plug the iMac into
    the LAN port, plug the WAN port into the ASDL modem. Run the Airport
    Admin Utility on either Mac to configure and setup the base station.
    The G4 would need an Airport card ($80). If you want to add additional
    computers to the network, get an inexpensive 10/100BaseT switch.
    $10-$20 at <dealmac.com>. Plug the switch into the Airport Extreme base
    station LAN port, plug the computers into the other ports of the switch.

    The least expensive option. Do not go wireless. Get a simple DSL/Cable
    router (no wireless). You can get D-Link, LinkSys, SMB, Netgear, etc...
    You should be able to pick up one of these routers for under $50 via
    <dealmac.com>. Most of these come with 1 WAN port and 3 to 5
    10/100BaseT LAN ports. Connect the WAN port to the ASDL modem. Connect
    ethernet cables from all your computers to the LAN ports of the router.
    Use a web browser to configure the router. This includes configuring
    your ASDL username/password. Not much else you would need to do, unless
    you want to have ports on some of your Macs visible on the internet
    (like a web server, or ftp server, remote login, etc..., but most people
    do not need that stuff and prefer to keep the internet from getting
    inside the firewall of their router.

    Wireless butless expensive than a wireless base station, but still all
    Apple. Get an Airport card for both the iMac and the G4 (approx $80
    each). Connect the ASDL modem to the ethernet port of either the iMac
    or the G4, and configure it to connect to the ASDL as if it is the only
    Mac. Now configure the ASDL connected Mac to act as an Airport wireless
    router. Mac OS X has Preferences -> Sharing -> Internet to allow you to
    share your internet connection via the Airport card in the ASDL connect
    Mac with other Airport Macs in your home. Mac OS Classic Airport
    software has a router utility (I forget what it is called, but you run
    the Airport Admin Utility and it will set it up and start it for you).

    Alternate less expensive wireless setup, but now you are responsible for
    mentally thinking Mac while doing things PC oriented. You will still
    need at least one Airport card for the G4 ($80). Get a 3rd party
    802.11b WiFi DSL/Cable Router. Should be able to find one from SMC,
    D-Link, LinkSys, Netgear, etc... for under $100 on <dealmac.com>. One
    CAUTION: Some of these routes do not pass AppleTalk. If you are running
    Mac OS X, this is not a problem as Mac OS X can run all TCP/IP. If you
    are running Mac OS 9 or earlier, this may be an issue. Check the
    vendor's web site for the model you are thinking of getting and see if
    it routes AppleTalk if you need it. Connect the router's WAN port to
    the ASDL modem. Connect one Mac to the LAN port (so that you can
    configure the router; set up the ASDL username and password). Follow
    the instructions for configuring the router. The fun part comes if you
    want to enable the wireless security features. The trick here is to
    either specify the WEP password so that both the 3rd party WiFi router
    and the Macs agree on what it is, is to enter the password as a
    hexidecimal value, _NOT_ as a text string. Then on the Mac enter the
    hex password with a leading Dollar Sign. This is a pain, but running
    without a WEP password means your wireless LAN it totally wide open and
    anyone can watch what you are doing.

    Having tried all of these (except having the Mac act as a wireless
    router), I can say that I respect the all Apple approach as it is _MUCH_
    easier to setup and administer. But then again, once you do get it
    working the way you want, generally it continues to work without any
    problems (until you have that lightning strike that takes out something
    important and then you are trying to remember how to do it all over
    again (which happened to me 7 days ago; I now have more Apple equipment
    and less 3rd party WiFi equipment :-)

    Good luck. I hope this helps.

    Bob Harris
    Bob Guest

  7. #7

    Default Re: Wireless ADSL network

    In article <telus.net>,
    Frater Taciturnus <com> wrote:
     [/ref]

    <snip>
     
    I used a Linksys wireless "B" 4-port router to connect my hybrid G3/G4
    via ethernet, my G4 tower and iBook via wireless. The Airport card for
    the G4 was about $71 and the Linksys wireless "B" router was about $80.
    I gave the router to my daughter who now has her G4 tower and her room
    mates' iBook and Sony Vaio (Windows ME) connected wirelessly. Easy to
    configure (the Windows was a tad bit difficult) and has been rock
    solid.

    --
    Deja Moo: I've seen this bull before.

    My address has been anti-spammed.
    Please reply to: net replacing the invalid with sonic.
    Otto Guest

  8. #8

    Default Re: Wireless ADSL network

    That has to be one of the most ration and well thought out answers on
    Mac Wireless options I have ever read. Good job Bob. I'm going to keep
    a copy just for refernce. Hope you don't mind if I use it again
    elsewhere (with credit to you).

    Oh and Fratner, Bob is right. I have tried MOST of his listed options
    at one time or another, and going with all Apple is the best way to go.

    In article <zk3.dec.com>,
    Bob Harris <dec.com> wrote:
     
    >
    > Several approaches.
    >
    > The easiest to setup and admin. Get an Airport Extreme base station
    > from Apple (includes a wireless print server USB port; I have one of
    > these and the print server is nice in that my wife and I are both using
    > wireless laptops and do not want a printer plugged in it, or running a
    > desktop system just so we can print). <smalldog.com> has refurbed units
    > $172 with shipping via a link from <dealmac.com>. Plug the iMac into
    > the LAN port, plug the WAN port into the ASDL modem. Run the Airport
    > Admin Utility on either Mac to configure and setup the base station.
    > The G4 would need an Airport card ($80). If you want to add additional
    > computers to the network, get an inexpensive 10/100BaseT switch.
    > $10-$20 at <dealmac.com>. Plug the switch into the Airport Extreme base
    > station LAN port, plug the computers into the other ports of the switch.
    >
    > The least expensive option. Do not go wireless. Get a simple DSL/Cable
    > router (no wireless). You can get D-Link, LinkSys, SMB, Netgear, etc...
    > You should be able to pick up one of these routers for under $50 via
    > <dealmac.com>. Most of these come with 1 WAN port and 3 to 5
    > 10/100BaseT LAN ports. Connect the WAN port to the ASDL modem. Connect
    > ethernet cables from all your computers to the LAN ports of the router.
    > Use a web browser to configure the router. This includes configuring
    > your ASDL username/password. Not much else you would need to do, unless
    > you want to have ports on some of your Macs visible on the internet
    > (like a web server, or ftp server, remote login, etc..., but most people
    > do not need that stuff and prefer to keep the internet from getting
    > inside the firewall of their router.
    >
    > Wireless butless expensive than a wireless base station, but still all
    > Apple. Get an Airport card for both the iMac and the G4 (approx $80
    > each). Connect the ASDL modem to the ethernet port of either the iMac
    > or the G4, and configure it to connect to the ASDL as if it is the only
    > Mac. Now configure the ASDL connected Mac to act as an Airport wireless
    > router. Mac OS X has Preferences -> Sharing -> Internet to allow you to
    > share your internet connection via the Airport card in the ASDL connect
    > Mac with other Airport Macs in your home. Mac OS Classic Airport
    > software has a router utility (I forget what it is called, but you run
    > the Airport Admin Utility and it will set it up and start it for you).
    >
    > Alternate less expensive wireless setup, but now you are responsible for
    > mentally thinking Mac while doing things PC oriented. You will still
    > need at least one Airport card for the G4 ($80). Get a 3rd party
    > 802.11b WiFi DSL/Cable Router. Should be able to find one from SMC,
    > D-Link, LinkSys, Netgear, etc... for under $100 on <dealmac.com>. One
    > CAUTION: Some of these routes do not pass AppleTalk. If you are running
    > Mac OS X, this is not a problem as Mac OS X can run all TCP/IP. If you
    > are running Mac OS 9 or earlier, this may be an issue. Check the
    > vendor's web site for the model you are thinking of getting and see if
    > it routes AppleTalk if you need it. Connect the router's WAN port to
    > the ASDL modem. Connect one Mac to the LAN port (so that you can
    > configure the router; set up the ASDL username and password). Follow
    > the instructions for configuring the router. The fun part comes if you
    > want to enable the wireless security features. The trick here is to
    > either specify the WEP password so that both the 3rd party WiFi router
    > and the Macs agree on what it is, is to enter the password as a
    > hexidecimal value, _NOT_ as a text string. Then on the Mac enter the
    > hex password with a leading Dollar Sign. This is a pain, but running
    > without a WEP password means your wireless LAN it totally wide open and
    > anyone can watch what you are doing.
    >
    > Having tried all of these (except having the Mac act as a wireless
    > router), I can say that I respect the all Apple approach as it is _MUCH_
    > easier to setup and administer. But then again, once you do get it
    > working the way you want, generally it continues to work without any
    > problems (until you have that lightning strike that takes out something
    > important and then you are trying to remember how to do it all over
    > again (which happened to me 7 days ago; I now have more Apple equipment
    > and less 3rd party WiFi equipment :-)
    >
    > Good luck. I hope this helps.
    >
    > Bob Harris[/ref]
    Paul Guest

  9. #9

    Default Re: Wireless ADSL network

    In article <giganews.com>,
    Paul Hoppe <phoppe.com> wrote:
     

    Go right ahead. My goal was to help. If that means more people will
    give (and get) useful information (atributed or not), then the person
    being helped is well servered.

    Bob Harris
     
    > >
    > > Several approaches.
    > >
    > > The easiest to setup and admin. Get an Airport Extreme base station
    > > from Apple (includes a wireless print server USB port; I have one of
    > > these and the print server is nice in that my wife and I are both using
    > > wireless laptops and do not want a printer plugged in it, or running a
    > > desktop system just so we can print). <smalldog.com> has refurbed units
    > > $172 with shipping via a link from <dealmac.com>. Plug the iMac into
    > > the LAN port, plug the WAN port into the ASDL modem. Run the Airport
    > > Admin Utility on either Mac to configure and setup the base station.
    > > The G4 would need an Airport card ($80). If you want to add additional
    > > computers to the network, get an inexpensive 10/100BaseT switch.
    > > $10-$20 at <dealmac.com>. Plug the switch into the Airport Extreme base
    > > station LAN port, plug the computers into the other ports of the switch.
    > >
    > > The least expensive option. Do not go wireless. Get a simple DSL/Cable
    > > router (no wireless). You can get D-Link, LinkSys, SMB, Netgear, etc...
    > > You should be able to pick up one of these routers for under $50 via
    > > <dealmac.com>. Most of these come with 1 WAN port and 3 to 5
    > > 10/100BaseT LAN ports. Connect the WAN port to the ASDL modem. Connect
    > > ethernet cables from all your computers to the LAN ports of the router.
    > > Use a web browser to configure the router. This includes configuring
    > > your ASDL username/password. Not much else you would need to do, unless
    > > you want to have ports on some of your Macs visible on the internet
    > > (like a web server, or ftp server, remote login, etc..., but most people
    > > do not need that stuff and prefer to keep the internet from getting
    > > inside the firewall of their router.
    > >
    > > Wireless butless expensive than a wireless base station, but still all
    > > Apple. Get an Airport card for both the iMac and the G4 (approx $80
    > > each). Connect the ASDL modem to the ethernet port of either the iMac
    > > or the G4, and configure it to connect to the ASDL as if it is the only
    > > Mac. Now configure the ASDL connected Mac to act as an Airport wireless
    > > router. Mac OS X has Preferences -> Sharing -> Internet to allow you to
    > > share your internet connection via the Airport card in the ASDL connect
    > > Mac with other Airport Macs in your home. Mac OS Classic Airport
    > > software has a router utility (I forget what it is called, but you run
    > > the Airport Admin Utility and it will set it up and start it for you).
    > >
    > > Alternate less expensive wireless setup, but now you are responsible for
    > > mentally thinking Mac while doing things PC oriented. You will still
    > > need at least one Airport card for the G4 ($80). Get a 3rd party
    > > 802.11b WiFi DSL/Cable Router. Should be able to find one from SMC,
    > > D-Link, LinkSys, Netgear, etc... for under $100 on <dealmac.com>. One
    > > CAUTION: Some of these routes do not pass AppleTalk. If you are running
    > > Mac OS X, this is not a problem as Mac OS X can run all TCP/IP. If you
    > > are running Mac OS 9 or earlier, this may be an issue. Check the
    > > vendor's web site for the model you are thinking of getting and see if
    > > it routes AppleTalk if you need it. Connect the router's WAN port to
    > > the ASDL modem. Connect one Mac to the LAN port (so that you can
    > > configure the router; set up the ASDL username and password). Follow
    > > the instructions for configuring the router. The fun part comes if you
    > > want to enable the wireless security features. The trick here is to
    > > either specify the WEP password so that both the 3rd party WiFi router
    > > and the Macs agree on what it is, is to enter the password as a
    > > hexidecimal value, _NOT_ as a text string. Then on the Mac enter the
    > > hex password with a leading Dollar Sign. This is a pain, but running
    > > without a WEP password means your wireless LAN it totally wide open and
    > > anyone can watch what you are doing.
    > >
    > > Having tried all of these (except having the Mac act as a wireless
    > > router), I can say that I respect the all Apple approach as it is _MUCH_
    > > easier to setup and administer. But then again, once you do get it
    > > working the way you want, generally it continues to work without any
    > > problems (until you have that lightning strike that takes out something
    > > important and then you are trying to remember how to do it all over
    > > again (which happened to me 7 days ago; I now have more Apple equipment
    > > and less 3rd party WiFi equipment :-)
    > >
    > > Good luck. I hope this helps.
    > >
    > > Bob Harris[/ref][/ref]
    Bob Guest

  10. #10

    Default Re: Wireless ADSL network

    Bob Harris <dec.com> wrote: 


    The best part of this setup, I've found, is that the Airport Extreme
    base station has an in-built v.90 modem, which is not on any other brand
    that I could find. This has 2 advantages:

    1. If DSL is down, or you move somewhere without DSL, you can use the
    base station to dial up using the modem to your ISP using a standard
    telephone line.

    2. If you're on the road & you want to log in to the internet, or your
    own intranet, & you don't have a separate dial-in account to your DSL
    account, you can dial in to your Airport Extreme base station at home &
    route through to the internet via your DSL connection.

    Kwan.


    --
    Please remove SpamMeNot to reply. I apologise for the necessary use
    of this anti-spammation method.
    Kwan Guest

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